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Graduate Catalog

Department of Nursing

(585) 395-2355

Associate Professors: Kathleen Peterson-Sweeney, MS, PNP-C, University of Rochester. Assistant Professors: Coordinator of Graduate Program, Charlotte Torres, EdD, FNP-C, University of Rochester; Carroll Bouman, PhD, University of Rochester; Nancy Iafrati, MS, FNP-C, University of Rochester; Charlene Pope, CNM, MPH, PhC, Doctoral Candidate, University of Rochester; Mary Ellen Robinson, MS, FNP-C, Binghamton University. Adjunct: Jessie Drew-Cates, PhD, FNP-C, University of Rochester; Barbara Czerwinski, PhD, Texas Women's University; David Hicks, MD, University of Rochester.

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Philosophy
The curriculum of the Department of Nursing is derived from the program mission, purpose, objectives and organizing framework. The philosophy describes the faculty's beliefs concerning the purpose of nursing, the focus of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education, and the expectations for program graduates.

The faculty of the Department of Nursing at the SUNY Brockport believes that education is a lifelong process which fosters the cultural, psychosocial, and intellectual development of the individual. The faculty fully supports the mission of the College, recognizing that students bring to the educational setting a diversity of abilities, motivations, experiences, and cultures. Accordingly, opportunities are provided at both the undergraduate and graduate level, which allow each individual to build on past knowledge and experience and to develop within the educational philosophy of the State University of New York.

The faculty believes that nursing is a profession, science, and art with the primary purpose of assisting clients individuals, families and communities to retain, attain, and maintain an optimal level of wellness through purposeful interventions. The faculty believes that clients are a composite of physiological, psychological, developmental, sociocultural, and spiritual dimensions. Professional nurses use the nursing process to manage care of clients throughout the life cycle. Nurses work independently and in collaboration with other health professionals.

Nursing education uses knowledge drawn from nursing, the liberal arts, sciences, and humanities. Nursing curricula emphasize the development of concepts and skills which are essential to nursing practice, leadership and research, and fosters the development of critical thinking. Students are active, responsible participants in the learning process.

The faculty believes that baccalaureate education serves as the foundation for graduate study and continuing professional and personal growth. The master's program prepares specialists who will assume a leadership role in the delivery of health care to individuals across life's continuum.

Program Purpose
The purpose of the graduate program is to prepare family nurse practitioners who can deliver culturally sensitive and competent primary health care to rural and underserved populations. The curriculum provides a foundation to empower graduates to assume a leadership role in the delivery of primary health care to individuals and families across the lifespan. Interdisciplinary collaboration, consultation and scholarly inquiry are emphasized within the context of the program. The curriculum offers a dynamic set of educational experiences that capitalize on the rich and varied learning opportunities found within the College and surrounding community settings.

The curriculum is designed to accommodate students seeking Master of Science/Family Nurse Practitioner preparation, as well as students with a graduate degree in nursing who seek post-master certification as a family nurse practitioner.

Program Objectives
At the completion of the Family Nurse Practitioner program, the graduate will be able to:

  1. demonstrate expertise in the role of a family nurse practitioner;
  2. assume a leadership role in the delivery of primary health care to rural and underserved populations;
  3. integrate theories, concepts, and models from nursing and related disciplines to form the basis for the role of the family nurse practitioner;
  4. utilize the process of scientific inquiry to critique and apply evidence based models of care;
  5. validate, refine, and expand the scientific knowledge base of nursing;
  6. synthesize the physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual variables in the provision of primary health care;
  7. incorporate the managerial, educational, economic, ethical, political and sociocultural dimensions of the health-illness paradigm to the delivery of primary health care;
  8. engage in collegial and collaborative intra- and interdisciplinary relationships in the promotion of health and prevention of disease;
  9. meet the education requirements for national certification and New York state registration as a family nurse practitioner; and
  10. acquire the foundation for continuing educational and professional growth.

Degree Requirements
The Master of Science requirement of 48 credits may be completed on either a full- or part-time basis and include the following:

Graduate Core Courses
Credits
  NUR 600 Theoretical Foundations for Nursing
3
  NUR 610 Nursing Research I
3
  NUR 695 Nursing Research II
1
  NUR 698 Thesis/Scholarly Project
2
  NUR 640 Health Care Systems Management
3
  NUR 650 Professional Role
3
    Total:
15

Family Nurse Practitioner Courses
Credits
Clinical Hours
  NUR 665 Family Theory and Intervention
4
50
  NUR 670 Health Assessment for Advanced Practice Nursing
3
84
  NUR 680 Advanced Pharmacology
3
  NUR 690 Advanced Pathophysiology
3
  NUR 700 Advanced Practice Nursing I
4
136
  NUR 710 Advanced Practice Nursing II
4
136
  NUR 720 Advanced Practice Nursing III
4
136
  NUR 750 Family Nurse Practitioner Internship
5
168
    Total:
30
710
   
    Elective Course*
3
    Total Credits :
48

*An elective course that supports the role of the family nurse practitioner may be selected with the approval of the faculty advisor.

Post-master's Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate
Nurses who have earned a graduate degree in nursing may pursue a program of study leading to the Post-master's Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate. An individualized Plan of Study will be developed by the graduate faculty and the student in accordance with the student's academic and experiential backgrounds. Applicants seeking the Certificate program will be required to take or show evidence of competence in all of the family nurse practitioner courses listed above. In addition, applicants may be required to submit evidence of clinical competence in the concentration of their graduate degree. Those who complete the certificate program will be eligible to pursue national certification and obtain New York state registration as a family nurse practitioner.

Important Notice
National Nurse Practitioner accreditation standards and New York State Nurse Practitioner requirements and policies may lead to changes in degree and certification requirements during the term of this catalog. Check with a faculty advisor for the most current information.

Additional Requirements for Degree or Certificate Completion
A minimum GPA of 3.0 must be maintained throughout the course of study and a minimum grade of "B" must be obtained in each clinical course. Students who fail to maintain these requirements may be dismissed from the program.

The curriculum of the graduate program is structured to be flexible and responsive to students' educational and professional backgrounds and goals, and also proactive in responding to change within the field of health care. All degree or certificate requirements must be completed within five calendar years of the date of initial matriculation. An extension to the five-year program limit may be requested through the Coordinator of the Graduate Program. If an extension is granted and the requirements are not completed by the end of the extension, the student will lose matriculation status. At that point, the student must apply for re-admission to the program and will lose credit for courses taken more than five years prior to the new matriculation date.

Admission Requirements and Student Selection
Admission to the Master of Science or Post-master's Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate program at SUNY Brockport is based on the academic and personal qualifications of the respective applicant without regard to race, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origin, marital or veteran status or disability.

Admission is competitive, based on the number of well-qualified applicants and the limits of available faculty and resources within the program. Applicants who meet stated admission requirements are not guaranteed admission, nor are those who fail to meet those requirements necessarily precluded from admission if they offer other appropriate strengths (e.g., credentials) that reveal potential ability for graduate study.

To be eligible for consideration for admission, the applicant must submit a completed and signed application with applicable fees to the Office of Graduate Admissions. The following must be included as part of the self-managed application:

  • Evidence of a baccalaureate degree in nursing from a program accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency.
  • Evidence of two years of recent full-time nursing practice experience before matriculation.*
  • Undergraduate and, if applicable, graduate transcripts documenting a grade point average 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  • A copy of current registered professional nurse licensure in New York state.
  • Three letters of reference attesting to the applicant's professional qualities, practice competency and academic ability.
  • Documentation of successful completion of a basic physical assessment course and an introductory statistics course.
  • A personal statement of educational and professional goals.

*Students having less than two years of full-time nursing practice experience may be admitted to the program with the stipulation that the family nurse practitioner courses may not be taken until the experience requirement has been fulfilled.

The deadline for admission to the fall class is March 1 and deadline for admission to the spring class is October 1. All applications must be complete and submitted to the Office of Graduate Admissions by these deadlines. After all admission packets have been reviewed, the Department of Nursing Graduate Admission Committee will schedule individual interviews with potential candidates. This interview assesses communication skills, professional goals, self-awareness, interpersonal skills, and readiness for graduate work. The decision to accept or reject an applicant lies wholly within the jurisdiction of the department. Candidates will be informed of their admission status by May 1st for fall admission and by December 1 for spring admission.

Transfer Courses and Non-matriculated Status
Credit for courses taken before matriculation may be given if a grade of "B" or better has been earned and if the courses are comparable to required courses. Generally, courses taken more than five years before matriculation will not be considered. Please note that any courses taken prior to matriculation will not automatically be accepted as part of the graduate program regardless of where or when the course was taken. Thus, it is in the applicant's best interest to seek advisement prior to taking courses.

A maximum of 12 credits may be transferred from other colleges and universities with departmental approval. Students wishing to transfer credit from another institution must submit a syllabus for each course for which they wish to receive credit. The Graduate Admissions and Progression Committee will review that data and will make the final decision to accept or reject each course.

Students who plan to apply for admission to the graduate program should work directly with the Department of Nursing before engaging in non-matriculated graduate study. Non-matriculated students may take non-clinical courses based on space availability and faculty approval. The number of credits that can be completed as a non-matriculated student and applied towards a degree program's requirements is limited to nine credits.

Nursing Courses

NUR 600 Theoretical Foundations for Nursing. Explores the theoretical bases and conceptual frameworks in nursing. Synthesizes theoretical constructs that guide nursing practice and the provision of primary health care to rural and underserved populations. Applies theories and concepts to guide the provision of health care across the lifespan and health continuum. 3 Cr.

NUR 610 Advanced Nursing Research I. Emphasizes application of the research process to advanced practice nursing, focusing on the identification of problems, literature reviews, philosophical, and use of conceptual frameworks in nursing research. Explores interdisciplinary research and its implications for advanced practice nursing. Provides students with the foundation to develop a research proposal or clinical project related to primary health care. 3 Cr.

NUR 640 Health-care Systems Management. Examines organizational and managerial theories and their application to the provision of primary health care to rural and underserved populations. Emphasizes the development of interdisciplinary and community partnerships, information systems, and health-care policy and economics. 3 Cr.

NUR 650 Professional Role. Focuses on changes in professional role responsibilities and leadership within the health-care delivery system. Examines professional, ethical, legal/regulatory, economical and sociopolitical issues. Analyzes the evolving role of the FNP in the delivery of primary health care to rural and underserved populations. 3 Cr.

NUR 665 Family Theory and Intervention. Using various theoretical perspectives, focuses on critical life phases and events in family systems that affect the development, relationships, and health of a family over time. Applies family theory to assessments and interventions. 4 Cr.

NUR 670 Health Assessment for Advanced Practice Nursing. Combines lecture and laboratory/clinical learning experiences to guide the development of advanced-practice nursing competencies in the health assessment of individuals and families across the lifespan. Emphasizes the integration of physiological, psychosocial, cultural, developmental and spiritual assessment into interviewing, history taking and physical examination. Focuses on the critical thinking, diagnostic reasoning processes, and effective written and verbal communication skills. 3 Cr.

NUR 680 Advanced Pharmacology. Advances nursing knowledge of pharmacological therapeutics and the assessment, decision making, teaching, monitoring, and evaluative approaches related to pharmacotherapeutic applications to functioning. Provides a theoretical context along with supervised clinical practice. Addresses client/ family responses to common acute and chronic health problems through the integration of physiologic, pathophysiologic, psychosocial, cultural, developmental and spiritual domains. Focuses on the nurse practitioner management of the health care needs of clients from the young adult through the childbearing and childrearing period. 4 Cr.

NUR 690 Advanced Pathophysiology. Presents a scientific knowledge base relevant to selected pathophysiologic states commonly occurring in primary care. Provides a foundation for clinical decision making related to diagnostic assessment and initiation of therapeutic regimens. Correlates developmental alterations with clinical diagnosis and management. 3 Cr.

NUR 695 Advanced Nursing Research II. Prerequisite: NUR 610. Emphasizes research methodology, including data collection, selection of instruments, and data analysis. Includes use of collaborative and consultative skills during the research process. 1 Cr.

NUR 698 Thesis/Scholarly Project. Prerequisites or corequisites: NUR 695 and project chairperson's permission. An individually designed course in consultation with the student's thesis or scholarly project chairperson. Achieves integration of concepts, methods and knowledge relative to a specific issue in advanced nursing practice. Entails preparation of a problem statement/research hypothesis or formulation of a clinically oriented project and oral defense of the selected problem. Students will register for a minimum of one credit every semester once they begin to work with their chairperson. NUR 698 may be repeated, but only two credits may be used toward the credits required for graduation. Students must maintain continuous registration (fall and spring semesters) from the first semester they begin working on their proposal until it is completed and accepted. Variable 1-2 credits. (Two credits required for graduation.)

NUR 700 Advanced Practice Nursing I. Prerequisites or corequisites: NUR 670, 680 and 690. Emphasizes assisting clients and families to attain and maintain their highest level of health functioning. Provides a theoretical context along with supervised clinical practice. Addresses client/family responses to common acute and chronic health problems through the integration of physiologic, pathophysiologic, psychosocial, cultural, developmental and spiritual domains. Focuses on the nurse practitioner management of the health care of clients/families from the newborn through the adolescent period. 4 Cr.

NUR 710 Advanced Practice Nursing II. Prerequisites or corequisites: NUR 670, 680 and 690. Emphasizes assisting clients and families to attain and maintain their highest level of health client care. Includes presentations, with integrated use of case study analyses as an essential component of this course. Includes legal and ethical considerations and the principles regarding selection of pharmaceutical agents and prescriptive authority. 3 Cr.

NUR 720 Advanced Practice Nursing III. Prerequisites or corequisites: NUR 670, 680 and 690. Emphasizes assisting clients and families to reach and maintain their highest level of health functioning. Provides a theoretical context along with supervised clinical practice. Addresses client/family responses to common acute and chronic health problems through the integration of physiologic, pathophysiologic, psychosocial, cultural, developmental and spiritual domains. Focuses on the nurse practitioner management of the health care of clients from middle to older adulthood. 4 Cr.

NUR 730 Epidemiology in Health Care. Based on the study of populations, identifies how the frequency and patterns of health-related states, behaviors, and events affect the practice of primary care. Focuses on case-based problem solving and the analysis and critique of current diagnostic or screening tests and the merits and quality of clinical investigations reported in the health sciences for the promotion of health and the prevention and treatment of disease. 3 Cr.

NUR 740 Issues in Rural Health and Safety. Presents the major issues and challenges that impact on the provision of health care to rural populations. Focuses on the unique aspects of commonly occurring rural health issues including occupational health and safety. 3 Cr.

NUR 750 Family Nurse Practitioner Internship. Prerequisites: NUR 700, 710 and 720. Provides the family nurse practitioner student with concentrated clinical practice opportunities in a primary care setting. Facilitates synthesis of advanced knowledge and practice competencies. Includes student seminars throughout the course. Specific objectives, methods of evaluation and other requirements for this clinical experience will be individualized and determined prior to course registration. 5 Cr.