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Undergraduate Studies Catalog 2001-2003

Department of Business Administration
and Economics

119 Hartwell Hall
(585) 395-2623

Chairperson: Steven T. Breslawski; Associate Chairperson: Jerald Weaver; Professors: John D. Chasse, John J. Spitzer; Associate Professors: Breslawski, Charles Callahan, III, James J. Cordeiro, William H. Dresnack, Richard J. Fenton, John T. Gardner, Baban Hasnat, Sandeep Singh, Susan Stites-Doe, Jeffrey Strieter; Assistant Professors: Inaam A. Al-Hashimi, Ilon Alon, Gary P. Briggs, Edward W. Eramus, Asri Jantan, D. Donald Kent, Jane Romal, Ralph Trecartin, Melissa Waite, Jerald Weaver; Emeritus Faculty: Rawle E. Farley, Yu-Ku Li, Edward F. Van Duzer.

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The Department of Business Administration and Economics offers degree programs in (1) accounting, (2) international business and economics, and (3) business administration. Business administration majors may specialize in accounting, finance, management, marketing, and pre-law. Additionally, the department offers minors in business administration and economics. Our programs are designed to (1) prepare students for a wide variety of business careers, and (2) provide excellent preparation for graduate school, including MBA and law degree programs.

Mission Statement
Philosophy: A high quality undergraduate business program continuously improves and prepares students to (1) function well in entry-level business positions, (2) grow in their careers, and (3) pursue graduate education. A high quality program responds to its constituencies; ours include students, alumni, employers, accrediting bodies, and the State University and citizens of New York.

We value faculty contributions in teaching, scholarship, and service to our institutions, disciplines, and communities. Our primary concern is meeting the educational needs of our students. We believe that our teaching efforts benefit from continuous faculty development and scholarly growth. Therefore, scholarship, professional practice, and the advancement of pedagogy are important faculty pursuits. Service activities enhance the reputation of the College and have a positive impact on its programs. Relative emphasis is placed in this order: teaching, scholarship, and service.

Mission and Purpose: In concert with the regional College mission, the department provides access to quality business education for broad spectrum of academically prepared students, including transfer and non-traditional students. This mission is achieved by (1) delivering relevant and contemporary curricula, (2) combining theories of business and economics with business skills, and (3) developing students' professional orientation and social acumen.

Basic Goals: All of our programs share these basic goals:

  1. Be recognized by our stakeholders as a high quality program.
  2. Foster high placement rates and a lifetime of success for graduates.
  3. Recruit and retain capable students.
  4. Understand and address the unique needs of adult learners, full- and part-time employed students, and transfer students.
  5. Validate and continuously improve program quality using AACSB accreditation standards and other benchmarking processes.
  6. Create a culture that fosters and encourages (1) mutually beneficial relationships between students, faculty, alumni, and the business community, and (2) a belief that life-long learning is vital to career success.

Statements of Purpose: Individual Degree Programs. All of our programs build on a comprehensive liberal arts education and provide a broad understanding of business theory and practice in accounting, economics, finance, international business, management, and marketing.

All programs develop proficiencies in written and oral communication, numeracy, critical thinking, and teamwork. Graduates have sufficient academic preparation to pursue graduate business education.

The Accounting Major Program provides students with the education and training needed to pursue professional accounting positions in CPA firms, industry, and government. The degree qualifies students for admission to the Uniform CPA Examination in New York.

The Business Administration Major Program provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to assume entry-level positions in an organization's accounting, financial, marketing, and management systems. The Pre-law track within the management specialty provides a solid foundation for students pursuing law school.

The International Business Program provides an interdisciplinary education that includes foreign language proficiency and cross-cultural awareness. Students gain knowledge and develop skills relevant to conducting business in the international domain. Graduates are prepared for careers with organizations with international operations.

Minor in Business Administration
A minor in business consists of 21 credits of selected business and economics course work as described in Course Requirements below, with a minimum of 12 credits of coursework completed at SUNY Brockport. A student's cumulative GPA, in the Brockport courses used to satisfy requirements of the minor, must be at least 2.0.

Declaring the Minor in Business

Students should declare the minor in business immediately after completing any one of the required courses. It is important to declare a minor as soon as possible as it will allow the department to plan for enrollments and ensure that an adequate number of course seats are available for students minoring in business. The forms required to declare the minor are available in 119 Hartwell Hall.

Course Requirements

 
Credits
ECN 201, 202 or 1001 Introductory Economics
3
ACC 280 Introduction to Accounting
3
ECN 204 Introduction to Statistics or equivalent
3
BUS 325 Principles of Finance (prerequisites include MTH 121 or equivalent)
3
BUS 335 Principles of Marketing
3
BUS 365 Principles of Management
3
one additional BUS/ECN course at the 300/400 level, excluding BUS 366
3
Total:
21

1 ECN 100 is a one semester course in micro- and macro-economics. ECN 100 does NOT meet the requirements for any major in the department.

Notes:

  1. Students may substitute the ACC 281/282 sequence for ACC 280.
  2. An introductory statistics course from another discipline (e.g., psychology) may be substituted for ECN 204. However, credit toward graduation will be allowed for only one introductory statistics course.
  3. Students must complete the minor with an overall GPA of 2.0 in the courses taken at SUNY Brockport.
  4. Students majoring in accounting or international business and economics may not declare a business minor.
  5. The number of minors may be limited to ensure an adequate number of seats for business majors; students should declare the minor as soon as possible to ensure admission.

ADVISEMENT: The student's MAJOR advisor provides pre-registration approval for courses in the minor. Business and Economics faculty can serve as informal advisors in the selection of the required upper division elective.

Minor in Economics

  1. Economics Minor with a Liberal Arts Major
    Eighteen credits must be successfully completed, including: ECN 201, 202, 301, 302, and two additional upper-division economics courses. ECN 305 may be substituted for ECN 301, but both courses may not be taken for credit. A minimum of nine credits of coursework must be completed at SUNY Brockport. A student's cumulative GPA, in the Brockport courses used to satisfy requirements of the minor, must be at least 2.0.
  2. Economics Minor with a Business Administration Major
    ECN 201, 202, 302, 304, and 301 or 305, plus one additional upper-division economics course must be successfully completed. A minimum of nine credits of coursework must be completed at SUNY Brockport. A student's cumulative GPA, in the Brockport courses used to satisfy requirements of the minor, must be at least 2.0.

Course Descriptions
Note: Whenever the terms "MTH 121 or higher" or "MTH 201 or higher" are used, the following math courses are excluded: MTH 243, 313 and 441.

Accounting Courses

ACC 280 Introduction to Accounting (B). Prerequisite: MTH 121 or higher. Surveys aspects of both financial and management accounting from a user's perspective. Includes the accounting cycle, and preparation and analysis of financial statements and management reports. This course does not meet any requirements for accounting and business administration majors. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ACC 281 Introduction to Financial Accounting (B). Prerequisite: MTH 121 or higher. Provides an introduction to financial statements prepared under generally accepted accounting principles and how such statements are used. Includes preparation and analysis of financial statements and related footnote disclosures, and examines recording and reporting elements of financial statements. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ACC 282 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (B). Prerequisites: ACC 281, and MTH 121 or higher. Provides an introduction to accounting information used by business managers to make short- and long-term decisions. Addresses cost accumulation and product costing, and survey of cost/volume/profit analysis, budgeting, standard costing and variance analysis, choice of business entity, forms of business financing, and introduction to basic income taxation. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ACC 283 Introduction to Accounting Systems and Software (B). Prerequisites: ACC 281 and CIS 106. Provides an introduction to accounting information systems used by businesses to accumulate accounting data, and the software used to manage the process. Includes the accounting cycle, sales and cash receipts, purchases and cash payments, inventory management, and payroll. Software used includes general ledger and financial statement applications, spreadsheets, word processing, and an Internet browser. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ACC 385 Intermediate Accounting I (B).Prerequisites: ACC 282 and MTH 201 or higher. Covers the accounting cycle in depth, generally accepted accounting principles, and preparation of general purpose financial statements and accounting measurements for cash, receivables, current liabilities, inventories, plant assets, and intangible assets. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ACC 386 Intermediate Accounting II (B).Prerequisites: A CC 385, ECN 204, and MTH 201 or higher. Emphasizes in-depth reporting for stockholders' equity and accounting for corporate bonds and long-term investments, revenue recognition, leases, pensions, statement of cash flows, and income tax allocations. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ACC 388 Cost Accounting (B).Prerequisites: ACC 282, and MTH 201 or higher. Analysis and reporting of internal accounting problems of a business dealing with cost behavior, cost accounting systems, budgeting, and performance measurement. Includes cost-volume-profit analysis, variance analysis, standard costing procedures, and managerial decisions analysis. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ACC 389 Accounting Profession Seminar (B).Prerequisites: ACC 281 and ACC 282. Corequisite: ACC 385. Develops the professional acumen of accounting students, consistent with the expectations of accounting firms. Examines accounting as a profession, focusing on expected professional comportment and work behaviors of accounting professionals. Students are required to conform to a mandatory dress code and to participate in events sponsored by professional accounting organizations. Accounting majors should complete this seminar in their junior year. 1 Cr. By Arrangement.

ACC 485 Federal Income Tax (B).Prerequisite: ACC 385. Covers fundamental income tax principles such as gross income, personal and business deductions, capital gains and losses, depreciation methods, and credits against the tax. Discusses tax-free exchanges for residential and commercial property. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ACC 486 Advanced Accounting (B).Prerequisite: ACC 386. Studies accounting for partnerships, branch operations, consolidated financial statements, and multi-national corporations. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ACC 487 Auditing (B).Prerequisite: ACC 386. Studies the theory and practice of auditing, including the accountant's methods and procedures used to obtain the necessary evidence upon which to base an opinion regarding the fair representations of a client's financial statements. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ACC 488 Federal Income Tax II.Prerequisite: ACC 485 or permission of instructor. Examines the Federal income taxation of corporations and partnerships. Includes corporate organization, dividend and other distributions, partial and complete corporate liquidation, the accumulated earnings tax, the personal holding company tax, taxation of S Corporations, and taxation of partnership interests. 3 Cr.

ACC 489 Accounting for Non-profit Entities (B).Prerequisite: ACC 386. Examines the unique characteristics of government and not-for-profit entities, including their use of funds and account groups. Emphasizes the accounting of various funds and account groups as well as other budgeting, classification, and financial reporting issues. 3 Cr. Spring.

ACC 498 Accounting Internship (A).Prerequisite: At least 12 hours of accounting coursework completed; 2.75 in major, 2.5 overall. Provides supervised experience in an accounting environment, with an opportunity to apply concepts learned in accounting coursework. An opportunity for students to better understand (1) accounting career opportunities, (2) the accounting work culture, (3) the high level of professional acumen required to be successful in accounting. Recommended for all accounting students without accounting work experience. 1-6 Cr. Every Semester.

ACC 499 Independent Study in Accounting (A).Prerequisites: ACC 281, ACC 282 and ACC 385 or instructor's permission. Students pursue accounting topics and/or projects beyond those covered in regularly scheduled accounting courses. Arranged in consultation with the instructor/sponsor who will supervise and direct the student. Registration requires completion of forms prior to the beginning of the semester. 1-6 Cr. Every Semester.

Business Administration Courses

BUS 317 Introduction to Management Information Systems (A,T). Prerequisite: CIS 106, ACC 280 or A CC 281, or instructor's permission. Explores the use of information systems in organizations. Examines how different types of information systems are used to enhance performance of organizations, management, and employees. Introduces the system development process and the management of information system resources, including data, hardware, software, infrastructures and personnel. Develops an intermediate level of end-user computing skill, and assumes introductory-level knowledge of MS Office applications. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 325 Principles of Finance (A).Prerequisites: ACC 280 or A CC 281; ECN 201, 202, and 204; MTH 121 or higher. Corequisites: CIS 106 (or ability to use spreadsheets), ENL 308 or instructor's permission. Provides a foundation in corporate financial decision making. Covers the business environment, time value of money, risk and diversification, market efficiency and valuation. Applies these concepts to financial analysis and planning, capital budgeting, and financing. (Note: Declared minors in business may enroll in the course with ECN 100 or ECN 201 or ECN 202.) 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 335 Principles of Marketing (A). Helps students develop an understanding of marketing in an organization through analyses of role, structure and processes, as they relate to proprietary and public organizations; and covers selection of markets, service/products, and analysis of consumer needs and wants. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 345 International Business Environment (A). Analyzes the environmental aspects of foreign countries, the ability to promote trade with other countries, and the sovereign rights of other nations and their people. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 365 Principles of Management (A). An introductory course designed to acquaint students with an overall understanding of management. Discusses and explores the classic function of management including motivating, planning, organizing, influencing and controlling. Uses various methods to present the material. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 366 Organizational Behavior (A). Prerequisites: BUS 335, ECN 201, and ECN 202. Ability to use a word processor is assumed. Completion of ENL 308 is advised. Examines the interaction between micro-level individual behavior and characteristics and the macro-level dynamics of an organization, highlighting management functions that facilitate motivation, control, and success of the organization. Topics include human motivation, performance appraisal, group dynamics, communications, organizational development, organizational culture, cross-cultural and global issues. (Open to majors and intents only, business and accounting.) 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 368 Management Skills (A). Prerequisites: Declared business intent or major, ENL 308 and [BUS 366 or instructor's permission]. Develops skills that are key to effective management. Including interpersonal, leadership, time management, conflict resolution, communication, team, and presentation skills. Covers basic administrative skills; e.g., how to hire, how to fire, discussing performance evaluations, coaching, motivation, man aging meetings. Topics include diversity, self-awareness, ethical decision making, and business etiquette. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 369 Management Topics Seminar (A). Prerequisites: Declared major, BUS 366, ENL 308 or instructor's permission. Covers key issues important to any individual interested in a management career. Topics evolve and currently include quality, reengineering, diversity, compliance, downsizing, out sourcing, supplier development, compliance issues, trends in management education, etc. Helps students identify areas of specific interest within management and aid them in selecting their remaining electives. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 375 Business Law I (A). Provides basic knowledge of the legal environment of business, including, but not limited to, the judicial system of jurisprudence and the substantive laws of torts, contracts and agency. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 376 Business Law II (A). Prerequisite: BUS 375 or instructor's permission. Includes topics such as sales, negotiable instruments, secured transactions, bankruptcy, personal property, business entity concepts, real property, wills and trusts. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 378 Business, Government and Society (A). Prerequisites: BUS 375, declared major, minor, or intent. Completion of ENL 308 is advised. Investigates the balance between competitiveness, ethics, and various societal issues, developing the student's ability to critically analyze complex ethical and societal topics. Topics include identification and management of public issues, ethical frameworks and their relevance to business, social responsibility, ecology and the environment, public policy, and the justification for and current status of government regulation and oversight of business. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 417 Systems Analysis and Design (A). Prerequisite: BUS 317 or instructor's permission. Examines the phases within the systems life cycle for development of an information system application. Emphasizes the standards, tools and techniques required in the analysis of information requirements and in logical design. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 420 Short-Term Financial Management (A). Prerequisites: BUS 325, ENL 308, MTH 2XX. ACCM® Associate course. Comprehensive introduction to short-term financial management and working capital management, including cash management systems, management of corporate liquidity, receivables and payables management, banking and payments systems. Students successfully completing the course with a grade of "B" or better are currently eligible to take the Certified Cash Manager's (CCM®) exam and acquire the CCM® designation. 3 Cr. Fall.

BUS 421 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management (A). Prerequisites: BUS 325 and ECN 304. Provides an introduction to modern investment theory and analysis. Covers the organization and functioning of securities markets, risk and return relationships, modern portfolio theory, asset pricing models, efficient markets and arbitrage concepts, stocks, bonds, options, futures, mutual funds, convertibles, and warrants. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 422 Corporate Financial Policy (A). Prerequisites: BUS 325, ENL 308, and completion of departmental math prerequisites. Corequisite: ECN 304. Provides an in-depth coverage of corporate financial analysis and policy stressing agency theory, valuation and market efficiency, capital budgeting under conditions of certainty and uncertainty, capital structure, dividend structure, dividend policy, corporate restructuring and leasing. Extensive data and spreadsheet analysis. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 428 Seminar in Finance (A). Prerequisites: ENL 308, BUS 421, BUS 422, and departmental math requirement or instructor's permission. Addresses recent developments in the area of corporate financial policy and/or investment analysis. Reviews recent literature, analysis of cases and situations, and use of software packages as appropriate. Topics rotate, so students should check with instructor to confirm interest in the subjects to be addressed. Offered every year, typically in the spring. 3 Cr.

BUS 431 GEMS Seminar (A). Prerequisites: Permission by instructor, BUS 335. Survey course designed to give students hands-on exposure to a wide variety of specific, business-related topics that must be considered when conducting business in other countries. Topics include marketing, logistics, data bases and other information sources, the internet, political and economic factors, legal considerations, banking and financial implications. Primarily a seminar format. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 432 Sales Management (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Considers responsibilities and challenges of managing the sales function. Analytical and interpersonal skills are stressed, including planning, organizing, directing, motivating, and controlling a sales organization. Legal and ethical issues are examined. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 433 International Marketing (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Examines and analyzes the similarities and differences among domestic and foreign markets. Includes analysis of the consumers, 4 P's (product, price, place, promotion), uncontrollable variables, and implementation of the marketing concept in a foreign market. Investigates the coordination and integration of a firm's national marketing program with its foreign marketing program. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 434 Direct Marketing (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Discusses one of the fastest growing marketing sectors. Covers database creation and management, direct mail, catalogs, telemarketing, and use of the media as stand-alones or integrated into a marketing mix. 3 Cr. Fall.

BUS 435 Consumer Behavior (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Explores how individual and group behavior affects marketing decisions, and how to market the right product/service to proper market segments. Relates behavior characteristics to product, price, place and promotion. 3 Cr. Fall.

BUS 436 Market Research (A). Prerequisites: BUS 335 and ECN 304. Covers marketing information; proper techniques for problem identification, and use of research methodology and techniques to define problems, using primary and secondary data sources. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 437 Promotional Policy (A). Prerequisites: BUS 335 and 435. Provides an overview of promotional policies, the relationship between promotional policy and marketing process, and the promotional policy in the context of the behavioral sciences. Discusses how to evaluate, select and implement integrated forms of communication to the publics served by the organization. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 438 Supply Chain Management (A). Prerequisites: BUS 335. Discusses the management of resource transformations between raw material and end user, via value added in manufacturing, marketing, or logistics. 3 Cr. Fall.

BUS 439 Retail Management (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Covers basic marketing functions of merchandising, promotion, control, and organization as they relate to retail organizations. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 440 Business-to-Business Marketing (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Studies industrial organizations, policy formation, and the use of buying and selling in industrial and governmental organizations, as well as buyer-seller relationships. 3 Cr. Fall.

BUS 441 Marketing Management (A). Prerequisites: Marketing specialty major and senior status. Provides an introduction to marketing problems as they relate to proprietary and public organizations, and decisions needed in product and service pricing, distribution and promotional strategy. Uses case analyses. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 445 International Financial Management (A). Prerequisite: BUS 345 or instructor's permission. Covers the theories and practical aspects of international financial management. Includes topics such as international payments mechanism, ex change market operations, arbitrage and hedging, spot and forward exchange, long-term international capital movements, international financial institutions, accounting, and taxation. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 461 Production and Operations Management (A). Prerequisites: ECN 304, CIS 106, and one of the following: MTH 201, 221, or 245. Completion of ENL 308 is advised. Focuses on issues and techniques associated with managing the day-to-day operations of the firm. Topics include decision-making, forecasting, project management, quality, inventory management, production planning, production methods, product design, location planning, facilities layout, scheduling, purchasing, and capacity planning. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 462 Quality Management Systems (A). Prerequisite: CIS 106, ECN 204, BUS 335, and BUS 345. Completion of ENL 308 is advised. Discusses and contrasts various organizational systems and behaviors that promote product and service quality. Investigates micro-level individual behaviors and macro-level organizational issues and policies that impact quality. Helps students understand how some management and organizational systems represent barriers to quality. Explores how approaches to quality differ across the international business community. Topics include TQM, continuous improvement, process reengineering, benchmarking, statistical process control, and ISO standards. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 463 Small Business Management (A). Prerequisite: CIS 106 and declared business major or minor. For the prospective small business manager who needs the tools and techniques essential for starting, building and maintaining a successful enterprise. Includes topics helpful to the successful operation of the small business, especially finance, marketing, production, personnel, inventory control, purchasing, planning, cost control, computer systems and entrepreneurial leadership. 3 Cr. Fall.

BUS 464 Electronic Commerce (A). Prerequisites: CIS 106, BUS 368, BUS 317, ENL 308 or instructor's permission. Explores issues, methods, and opportunities associated with electronic forms and methods of business., focusing on web-based commerce. Topics include business models, transactions and payments, processing, marketing issues, legal issues, security concepts and issues, creativity and idea generation, establishment of channel partnerships, hardware and software support and business resources available on the web. Students learn various aspects of designing, creating, and running an Internet business. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 465 Human Resources Management (A). Prerequisites: BUS 365 or 366. Ability to use a word processor and the internet is assumed. Completion of ENL 308 is advised. Undertakes a broad survey of the human resources management issues faced by contemporary organizations. Topics include human resource planning, recruitment, selection, orientation, training and development, performance management, compensation and benefits, employment law, unions, and collective bargaining. Students should take BUS 465 before enrolling in BUS 467 or 468. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 467 Employment Law and Compliance (A). Prerequisites: CIS 106, ENL 308, BUS 366, BUS 375, and BUS 368. Examines the relationship between public policy and current human resource management practices. Major emphasis on developing and understanding of the legal rights and responsibilities of employees and employers in the employment relationship. The content, enforcement, interpretation, and day-to-day application of employment laws are considered. It is recommended that students complete BUS 465 prior to taking this course. 3 Cr. Fall.

BUS 468 Advanced Human Resources Topics (A). Prerequisite: BUS 465 or instructor's permission. Designed to explore and further elaborate on key topics introduced in BUS 465. Topics include recruitment and selection, performance management and development, and compensation and benefits administration. Particular emphasis placed on developing skills and knowledge necessary for entry-level positions in human resources management. 3 Cr. Spring.

BUS 475 Strategic Management (A). Prerequisites: BUS 325, 335, 345, 366, ENL 308, declared business major, and senior status. The student's ability to use spreadsheet and word-processing software is assumed. Emphasizes the use of theories and models to solve complex business problems and prepare comprehensive case analyses. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

BUS 490 Senior Thesis Research (A). Prerequisites: GPA of 3.25, declared major, and 18 credits of upper-division business courses. Part of a two-semester course of study aimed at providing students an opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge in a specialized area. Allows students to select a faculty member willing to serve as their thesis advisor. Requires students to identify a research topic, and conduct background research to include the preparation of an introduction and bibliography. The data should be collected by the end of the semester. 3 Cr. By arrangement.

BUS 491 Senior Thesis (A). Prerequisite: Completion of BUS 490. Provides a continuation of BUS 490. Requires students to analyze collected data, explain the results and prepare conclusions. Requires the thesis to be in proper thesis format according to departmental procedures. 3 Cr. By arrangement.

BUS 498 Internship (A). Prerequisites: 2.75 GPA in major and 2.5 GPA overall. Provides supervised experience in a business environment. By arrangement through the department's internship coordinator. 3 or 6 Cr.

BUS 499 Independent Study in Business Administration (A). Entails special projects in business under the direction of individual staff members. Arranged in consultation with the instructor/sponsor and in accordance with the procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 1-6 Cr. By arrangement.

Economics Courses

ECN 100 Contemporary Economic Problems (A,S). Covers economic reasoning through the application of essential economic principles, basic principles underlying competing economic systems, and differences between macro- and micro-economic theory as applied to current issues confronting the American economic system. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ECN 201 Principles of EconomicsMicro (A). Prerequisite: MTH 121 or equivalent or instructor's permission. Covers determination of prices, demand and supply, behavior of the firm, and resource allocation. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ECN 202 Principles of EconomicsMacro (A). Covers problems of the aggregate economy and the policies used to control those problems. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ECN 204 Introduction to Statistics (A). Covers basic concepts of statistical analysis, including descriptive statistics, probability and expected value, sampling, and estimation. Note: Students who have received credit for BIO 431, MTH 243, PSH 202, PLS 300, SOC 200, or transfer credit for an elementary statistics course at another institution may waive ECN 204. Students will not receive credit for both ECN 204 and another elementary statistics course. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ECN 301 Intermediate Microeconomics (A). Prerequisites: MTH 121, ECN 201 and 202. Covers the basic tools and techniques of microeconomic analysis, the theory of consumer behavior and demand, theory of the firm and market equilibria, and input markets. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ECN 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics (A). Prerequisites: MTH 121, ECN 201 and 202. Covers the basic tools of macroeconomic analysis, including the determination of national income, employment and price levels, and an analysis of macroeconomic stabilization policies. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ECN 304 Intermediate Statistics (A). Prerequisite: MTH 121, ECN 204 or equivalent. Includes inferential statistics, index numbers, regression and correlation analysis, time series analysis, and chi-square tests. Emphasizes both the proper use and possible abuse of statistical methods in the context of business and economic applications. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ECN 305 Managerial Economics (A). Prerequisites: MTH 121, ECN 201, 202 and 204. Provides an introduction to the economic analysis of business decisions. Includes decision theory, demand theory, and the economic theory of production and costs. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ECN 321 Money and Banking (A). Prerequisites: ECN 201 and 202. Covers the role of money in the modern economy, emphasizing the role of depository institutions, and the evolution of the central banking structure together with domestic and inter national monetary policy. 3 Cr. Fall.

ECN 333 Health Economics (A). Prerequisite: ECN 201 or 111. Analyzes both narrow questions, such as the distribution, efficiency and equity of health delivery systems, and broader issues of the relation between public health and economic activity. 3 Cr. Spring

ECN 361 Labor Market Analysis (A). Prerequisites: ECN 201 or 111 and instructor's permission. Focuses on the issues and the analysis of labor markets. Includes wage determination and income distribution, skill structure of the workforce, unionism and unemployment. 3 Cr.

ECN 425 Financial Institutions (A). Prerequisite: ECN 302. Covers financial institutions, their operations, and the interrelationships among those that operate in the domestic and international money and capital markets, with emphasis on current problems and issues. 3 Cr. Every Year.

ECN 443 International Economics (A). Prerequisites: ECN 201 and ECN 202. Uses basic economic tools to study pure trade theory and interrelations between the domestic and the international economy. Examines the basis of trade; gains from trade; theory and practice of protection; nature, disturbance, and readjustment of the balance of payments; international monetary systems; internal and external balance; macroeconomic coordination; exchange rate variation; and other topics. 3 Cr. Spring.

ECN 453 Economic Development and Planning (A). Prerequisites: ECN 201 and ECN 202. Includes topics such as the characteristics of developing countries; the meaning of development; the issues relating to population growth, migration, employment; theories of growth and development; issues in agriculture and industrial development; the objectives, principles, techniques, and problems of economic planning; case studies in development and planning; and other topics. 3 Cr.

ECN 461 Human Resource Economics (A). Prerequisites: ECN 201 and 202. Covers the development and utilization of labor as a productive resource. Has a policy emphasis. 3 Cr.

ECN 485 Economics Research (A). Prerequisites: ECN 301, ECN 302, ECN 304 and one additional upper division economics course. Emphasizes the skills of inquiry, analysis, and communication required of a professional economist. Students learn to find information, analyze it, and communicate the results of their analysis. 3 Cr.

ECN 490 Senior Thesis Research (A). Prerequisites: GPA of 3.25, declared major, and 15 credits of upper-division economics courses. Part of a two-semester course of study aimed at providing students with an opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge in a specialized area. Allows students to select a faculty member willing to serve as their thesis advisor. Requires students to identify a research topic, and conduct background research to include the preparation of an introduction and bibliography. The data should be collected by the end of the semester. 3 Cr. By Arrangement.

ECN 491 Senior Thesis (A). Prerequisite: Completion of ECN 490. Provides a continuation of ECN 490. Requires students to analyze collected data, explain the results, and prepare conclusions.

Requires the thesis to be in proper thesis format according to departmental procedures. 3 Cr. By Arrangement.

ECN 498 Economics Internship (A). Prerequisite: At least 12 hours of economics coursework completed; 2.75 in major, 2.5 overall. Provides supervised experience in a work environment, with an opportunity to apply concepts learned in economics coursework. An opportunity for students to better understand career opportunities in the field of economics, including careers related to economic development, economic planning, international trade, banking systems, and banking policy. Helps students understand the professional expectations of employers and the work culture. 1-6 Cr. Every Semester.

ECN 499 Independent Study in Economics (A). Entails special projects in economics under direction of individual staff members. Arranged in consultation with the instructor/sponsor and in accordance with procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 1-6 Cr. By Arrangement.

 

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