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Undergraduate Studies Catalog 2001-2003

Department of Communication

227 Holmes Hall
(585) 395-2511

Chairperson: Virginia Bacheler; Professor: Floyd D. Anderson; Associate Professor: Fredric Powell; Assistant Professors: Matthew Althouse, Joseph Chesebro, Alice Crume, Carvin Eison, Donna Kowal, Katherine Madden, Bill W. Reed.

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Two major curricula are available to students through the Department of Communication: the major in communication and the journalism major.

Students majoring in Communication must choose one of three tracks: (1) Studies, (2) Applications, or (3) Broadcasting.

Communication majors concentrating in the studies track are required to complete two of five course specialties: communication and persuasion; interpersonal and organizational communication; public communication; media in society; and political communication.

In addition to the major, the department offers an 18-credit minor in the Communication Studies Track. Students who wish to minor in Communication must select one of the five specialties offered in the Studies Track in addition to CMC 201 and CMC 202.

Major in Communication
BA or BS

Communication Studies Track

The communication studies track deals with communication ranging from interpersonal communication to mass media. This track allows extensive sampling of these various human communication activities with learning experiences in theory, application of theory and performance. The available specialties with the track permit students to develop a program of study in those aspects of communication studies that most interest them. In order to maximize the individual benefit for each student, it is strongly recommended that students discuss the 12-hour course specialties and course choices with their academic advisors.

The communication studies track may serve as an academic major for elementary education certification.

Requirements
Students must complete 36 credits for the program, with at least 21 credits in courses numbered 300-499. The student concentrating in communication studies, in addition to the six-credit core consisting of CMC 201 Public Speaking and CMC 202 Principles of Communication, selects two 12-hour specialties from the five specialties offered, and six credits of communication electives which may be met by enrolling in any six credits of communication courses for which the student has met the prerequisite, if any. At least 15 of the 36 credits in communication studies must be taken at SUNY College at Brockport.

  1. Communication Studies Core
  2. Two Specialties
    1. Communication and Persuasion
    2. Interpersonal and Organizational Communication
    3. Media in Society
    4. Political Communication
    5. Public Communication
  3. Electives
I. Communication Studies Core (6 credits) Credits
  CMC 201 Public Speaking 3
  CMC 202 Principles of Communication 3

(Must be taken at SUNY Brockport and passed with a grade of "C" or better.)

II. Specialties (two must be selected)

A. Communication and Persuasion Specialty (12 credits)
The communication and persuasion specialty focuses on the study of persuasive transactions in public communication contexts. The anticipated general outcome of such study is an increased understanding of the processes and theoretical principles involved in persuasive human symbolic interaction. Students examine the theories of persuasion, participate in critical examination of practicing persuaders, and examine the context of persuasion. Students interested in pursuing graduate programs or having a specific interest in persuasion/communication theory are attracted to this sequence.

Required Courses: Credits
  CMC 219 Advertising, Mass Persuasion and the Consumer
3
  CMC 319 Propaganda and Persuasion
3
  CMC 411 Rhetorical Criticism
3
  CMC 492 Theories of Persuasion
3

B. Interpersonal and Organizational Communication Specialty (12 credits)
The interpersonal and organizational communication specialty focuses on the study of communication transactions in dyadic, small group, and organizational contexts. The anticipated general outcome of such study is an increased understanding of the principles, processes, and barriers involved in face-to-face human symbolic interaction.

Students interested in pursuing careers in human resources management, sales, and marketing will find this specialty particularly helpful.

Required Courses:
Credits
  CMC 273 Interpersonal Communication
3
  CMC 316 Interpersonal Communication in Business and the Professions
3
  CMC 473 Theories of Communication
3
  CMC 477 Organizational Communication
3

C. Media in Society Specialty (12 credits)

The media in society specialty focuses on the study of media in public and mass communication contexts. The anticipated general outcome of such study is an increased understanding of the interrelationships between communication media and sociocultural, political and intellectual environments. Any student interested in electronic or print media in his or her professional or business career would benefit from this specialty.

Required Courses:
Credits
  CMC 210 The Communications Revolutions
3
  CMC 372 Film as Social Commentary
3
 

CMC 463 Mass Communication and Society

3
  CMC 467 Theories of Mass Communication
3

D. Political Communication Specialty (12 credits)
The political communication specialty focuses on the study of communication transactions in political contexts. The anticipated general outcome of such study is an increased understanding of the principles and processes of political communication. This is an ideal specialty for students interested in politics, government, history or political science.

Required Courses:
Credits
  CMC 211 Protest and Public Opinion
3
  CMC 312 Argumentation and Debate
3
  CMC 417 20th-century Political Rhetoric
3
  CMC 419 Problems in Freedom of Speech
3

E. Public Communication Specialty (12 credits)
The public communication specialty focuses on the study of communication transactions in public settings. The anticipated general outcome of such study is an increased understanding of the principles and processes of speaker-to-audience interactions. Students anticipating work in public relations, sales, law, politics, and public service of any type will find this specialty valuable.

Required Courses:
Credits
  CMC 209 Speech Composition and Presentation
3
  CMC 410 Speakers, Campaigns and Movements
3
  CMC 415 Public Communication in Business, Administration and the Professions
3

III. Electives
All students in the communication studies track are to select a minimum of six credits of electives from communication courses for which they have met prerequisites.

Minor in Communication (18 credits)
(Available in the Studies Track only)
A minor in communication studies track consists of any one of the 12-credit specialties in the communication studies track, plus CMC 201, Public Speaking and CMC 202 Principles of Communication.

Broadcasting Track

The track in broadcasting prepares students for employment with television and radio stations, cable companies, independent production studios and corporate media centers. The broadcasting major consists of 36 credits of coursework, including 15 credits in liberal arts core courses and 21 credits in specialization courses (nine required credits and 12 credits of electives). At least 15 credits in communication must be taken at SUNY Brockport.

In addition, students pursuing the broadcasting track are required to complete a second major or minor at this college in a discipline other than communication.

Successful completion of the broadcasting track requires that students complete, with a grade of "C" or better, the following two courses:

CMC 202 Principles of Communication (must be taken at Brockport)
CMC 242 Fundamentals of Radio/Television
     
Liberal Arts Core (15 credits)
Credits
  CMC 202 Principles of Communication
(must be taken at Brockport)
3
  CMC 242 Fundamentals of Radio and Television
3
  CMC 243 Radio and TV Writing I
3
  CMC 467 Theories of Mass Communication
3
  CMC 496 Contemporary Broadcast Issues
3
   
Specialization Courses (9 credits)
Credits
  CMC 343 Broadcast Announcing
3
  CMC 346 Radio Production
3
  CMC 348 Television Production
3
   
Recommended Electives
(12 credits required; must be selected from the following):
Credits
  CMC 312 Argumentation and Debate
3
  CMC 319 Propaganda and Persuasion
3
  CMC 345 Radio/TV Writing II
3
  CMC 353 Broadcast Sales and Marketing
3
  CMC 358 ENG/EFP Field Production
3
  CMC 366 Broadcast Journalism
3
  CMC 446 Advanced TV Production
3
  CMC 454 Advanced TV Directing
3
  CMC 456 Professional Broadcast Internship
3
  CMC 465 Radio Practicum
3
  CMC 466 Advanced Broadcast Journalism
3
  CMC 468 Law of Mass Communication
3
  CMC 495 Senior Honors in TV/Radio Production
3
  ART 311 Introduction to Video
3
  ART 412 Video Production II
3
  THE 124 Voice and Diction
3

Communication Applications Track
The Communication Applications track program emphasizes application of communication theory and principles to an array of communication contexts such as: interpersonal relationships, small group interaction (includes the family), and communication in organizations. Drawing on interrelated principles from the fields of communication, computer science, English, psychology, and sociology, the student develops a holistic view that shows how human communication serves as the connecting force in interpersonal, group and organization contexts. In turn, this prepares students for careers in personnel administration, training and development, marketing, sales, human services, student services, and related careers that require excellent oral communication, written communication, and relationship skills. This track also develops the students' ability to (1) analyze (2) recommend improvements and (3) implement change in complex communication systems.

The track consists of a minimum of 45 credits (27 within the department and 18 outside of the department); 30 of the 45 credits must be taken in courses numbered 300-499. At least 15 credits in communication must be taken at SUNY Brockport.

Required Communication Courses (18 credits)
Credits
  CMC 202 Principles of Communication
(must be taken at SUNY Brockport and passed with a grade of "C" or better)
3
  CMC 273 Interpersonal Communication
3
  CMC 316 Interpersonal Communication in Business and the Professions
3
  CMC 415 Public Communication in Business, Administration, and the Professions
3
  CMC 473 Theories of Communication
3
  CMC 477 Organizational Communication
3
   
Cognate Requirements (9 credits, with not more than 3 credits from one department)
  CSC 304 Office Information Systems (prerequisite CSC 104)
3
  ENL 305 Advanced Composition
3
  PSH 331 Personality (prerequisite PSH 101, 110 or 112)
3
  or
  PSH 332 Social Psychology ( prerequisite PSH 101, 110 or 112)
3
  SOC 427 Power in Human Societies
3
  or
  SOC 361 Sex, Marriage and the Family
(prerequisite: any lower-division sociology course)
3
   
Communication Electives (9 credits)
Credits
To be selected by advisement from the following:
  CMC 312 Argumentation and Debate
3
  CMC 314 Small Group Communication
3
  CMC 317 Interviewing
3
  CMC 418 Inter-cultural Communication
3
  CMC 319 Propaganda and Persuasion
3
  CMC 332 Public Relations Principles & Practices
(prerequisite: CMC 224, Newswriting & Reporting)
3
  CMC 413 Nonverbal Communication
3
  CMC 475* Communication Applications Internship I
3
  CMC 479 Conflict Management
3
  CMC 483 Communication Training and Development
3

*Open only to seniors majoring in communication applications track who have a minimum GPA of 2.8 in their major.

Outside Specialization (9 credits)
After selecting a related area of academic study that most closely supports their educational and career goals, students will consult with their advisors to elect courses in that department. All three courses must be taken in one department and at least two must be at the 300-499 level. The disciplines are: Business Administration, Computer Science, Economics, English, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. If the student can demonstrate that some other academic area more clearly relates to his or her educational and career goals, this area can be used to meet this requirement. No course can be used to fulfill more than one requirement in this program.

Major in Journalism

The BA or BS in Journalism, administered by the Department of Communication, prepares students for careers in newspaper, magazine, broadcast and wire service journalism; public and community relations; public information; advertising; corporate communications and government service.

The major in journalism consists of at least 36 credit hours of coursework in journalism and communication within the Department of Communication, together with a requirement that students complete a minor or second major (or with department approval other contractual program of study not constituting a minor or second major) in a disciplinary area outside the Department of Communication. Completion of all requirements for the major in journalism thus requires a minimum of 54 credit hours of prescribed and elective coursework. At least 15 of the 36 credit hours required in journalism and mass communication courses must be taken at SUNY College at Brockport.

Successful completion of the major in journalism requires students to complete, with a grade of "C" or better, CMC 202, Principles of Communication (required of all majors in the Department of Communication and must be taken at Brockport); and both CMC 262, Introduction to Mass Communication, and CMC 224, Newswriting and Reporting (or their approved transfer equivalents). In addition, students are expected to successfully complete a Journalism Skill Qualifying Examination prior to their acceptance into the major in journalism.

   
Journalism and Mass Communication Requirements
Credits
I. Journalism/Mass Communication Core (21 credits)
  CMC 202 Principles of Communication
3
  CMC 210 The Communication Revolutions
3
  CMC 224 Newswriting and Reporting
3
  CMC 262 Introduction to Mass Communication
3
  CMC 468 Mass Media Law and Ethics
3
  CMC 493 Current Journalism Issues and Problems
3
  CMC 494 Journalism Thesis/Project
3
  AND any one of the following, selected by advisement:
  CMC 438 History of American Journalism
3
  CMC 463 Mass Communication and Society
3
  CMC 467 Theories of Mass Communication
3
   
In addition, students pursuing the journalism major must select, with advisement, one of the following 15 credit hour specialization sequences:
   
II. News-Editorial Sequence (15 credits)
Credits
  CMC 226 Advanced Newswriting and Reporting
3
  CMC 322 Editorial Methods
3
  CMC 325 Feature Writing
3
  AND any two of the following, selected by advisement:
  CMC 243 Radio and Television Writing I
3
  CMC 228 Public Relations Writing
3
  CMC 323 Newspaper Layout and Design
3
  CMC 326 Public Affairs Reporting
3
  CMC 328 Editorial and Opinion Writing
3
   
III. Electronic Journalism Sequence (15 credits)
Credits
  CMC 243 Radio and Television Writing I
3
  CMC 343 Broadcast Announcing
3
  CMC 366 Broadcast Journalism
3
  CMC 466 Advanced Broadcast Journalism
3
  AND any one of the following, selected by advisement:
 

CMC 346 Radio Production

3
 

CMC 348 Television Production

3
  CMC 358 ENG Field Production
3
   
IV. Public Relations and Public Information Sequence
(15 credits)
Credits
  CMC 228 Writing for Public Relations
3
  CMC 332 Public Relations Principles and Practices
3
  CMC 334 Public Relations Methods and Cases
3
  AND any two of the following, selected by advisement:
  CMC 201 Public Speaking
3
  CMC 243 Radio and Television Writing I
3
  CMC 325 Feature Writing
3
  CMC 432 Public Relations Campaigns
3
  CMC 477 Organizational Communication
3
  Total Journalism Credits:
36

Non-Communication Minor or Second Major

All students pursuing the major in journalism must also complete a minor (normally 18 credit hours) or a second major (normally 30-36 credit hours) in a discipline other than communication.

In lieu of a minor or second major, students may elect, with department approval, a contractual program consisting of a minimum of 18 credit hours of coursework in an area of study not identified as a formal minor or major at Brockport. Study of a foreign language other than Spanish or French (in which minors are offered), bilingual-multicultural studies or foreign cultural studies is encouraged as such a program.

Communication Courses

CMC 111 Oral Communication and Information Literacy (A). Develops proficiency in oral discourse through giving prepared speeches and evaluating oral presentations of others. Provides instruction in basic library and database information acquisition and research techniques, evaluating arguments in written and oral presentations, and reinforces writing skills in preparing speeches and a research paper. Should be completed in the freshman year. Minimum grade of "C" required to satisfy course requirement. Under development for Fall 2002. 3 Cr.

CMC 201 Public Speaking (A). Develops effective informational, persuasive and special-occasion speaking. Gives special attention to analyses of audience and speaking occasion, effective oral delivery styles and techniques, and development of critical listening skills. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

CMC 202 Principles of Communication (A). Introduces students to selected concepts, principles and theories of human communication. Includes study of verbal and nonverbal messages in the contexts of intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, public, and mediated communication. Required of all students majoring in communication studies or inter-disciplinary communication. Transfer courses will not be accepted to meet this requirement. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

CMC 209 Speech Composition and Presentation (A). Prerequisite: CMC 201 or instructor's permission. For students who wish to go beyond the basics of public speaking. Assists the speaker who wishes to overcome the apathetic or hostile audience, and helps the speaker learn how to motivate those who express sympathy, but are without commitment to an idea. Examines ethics and ghostwriting. 3 Cr.

CMC 210 The Communications Revolutions (A,H,E). Examines the role and influence of communication and communication media in the development of the social, political, intellectual and artistic milieus of world cultures. Gives attention to the relationship between forms of communicative expression and the historical periods in which they were produced. 3 Cr.

CMC 211 Protest and Public Opinion (A,H,W,D). Examines rhetorical transactions of group conflict; persuasive use of symbols; effects of mass media; and the process of theory-building in rhetorical studies. 3 Cr.

CMC 219 Advertising, Mass Persuasion and the Consumer (A,H). Explores the role and influence of advertising and mass persuasion in today's society, theories of persuasion and persuasive techniques commonly employed in advertising and mass persuasion, techniques of persuasive manipulation and its neutralization, and ethics in persuasion. 3 Cr.

CMC 224 Newswriting and Reporting (A).Instruction in the elements of news; types, style and structure of news stories; the lead. Fundamentals of news gathering, newswriting and news judgment for all media. Study of news sources, field work, research and interview techniques. Orientation to and practice in the use of electronic newswriting and production systems. 3 Cr.

CMC 226 Advanced Newswriting (A).Prerequisite: CMC 224. Advanced instruction and practice in gathering, writing and processing news for publication. Emphasis on background necessary for reporting and newswriting in specialized areas of coverage. Study of newsgathering and writing ethics and responsibilities. 3 Cr.

CMC 228 Writing for Public Relations.Instruction and practice in all aspects of public relations, publicity and institutional advertising writing for print and broadcast media. Covers writing news releases, backgrounders, brochures and flyers, speeches, radio and television materials, and reports. 3 Cr.

CMC 242 Fundamentals of Radio and Television (B). Provides an introduction to radio and television broadcasting. Studies basic principles and historical, economic and technological aspects of broadcasting. Requires readings in fundamental theory and cur rent practices. 3 Cr.

CMC 243 Radio and Television Writing I (A). Prerequisite CMC 242. Covers beginning writing for broadcast media. Concentrates on non-dramatic radio and TV continuity, commercials, public service announcements, news etc. Contrasts radio and TV writing styles. 3 Cr.

CMC 273 Interpersonal Communication (A,S). Introduces students to the theory and process of interpersonal communication, examining and applying the concepts and principles basic to inter-personal encounters. Acquaints students with the essentials of communication transactions in experiential learning opportunities that lead to effective skills in social, intimate, inter-gender, family, professional and intercultural relationships. 3 Cr.

CMC 312 Argumentation and Debate (A). Provides for the preparation and defense of logical argument, response to attacks by opponents, construction of cross-examination, undergoing cross-examination, research and support of arguments, and recognition and refutation of fallacies. 3 Cr.

CMC 314 Small Group Communication (A). Explores phases of the problem-solving process within a small-group setting, and the role-behavior required for effective group functioning. Requires students to lead a group problem-solving session; and participate in and observe small group problem-solving sessions. 3 Cr.

CMC 316 Interpersonal Communication in Business and the Professions (A). Covers the principles of interpersonal communication in organizations, facts and principles of organizational communication, participation in and analysis of lab learning experiences, and the synthesis and use of facts and principles to analyze the communication patterns illustrated in reality-based case studies and in data gathered through field observations. 3 Cr.

CMC 317 Interviewing (A). Provides an introduction to principles of effective interviewing. Focuses on specific purposes, types, and the skills applied to different interview situations. Includes assignments for analysis, preparation, conducting and assessing of interviews. 3 Cr.

CMC 319 Propaganda and Persuasion (A). Explores the theories, principles and methods of persuasion; the role and function of persuasion and propaganda in contemporary society; the preparation and presentation of persuasive messages; and concepts of ethical persuasion. 3 Cr.

CMC 322 Editorial Methods and Practices (B). Prerequisite: CMC 224. Examines the editing process, with emphasis on copy fitting and editing, and on editorial judgment. Includes preparation of copy for publication, headline writing, correction of copy, evaluation of news and news value, condensation of material, news display and makeup, and use of wire copy. Requires participation on student campus-community newspaper. 3 Cr.

CMC 323 Newspaper Layout and Design (B). Prerequisite: CMC 322. Provides an advanced study of editing principles and techniques to develop editorial judgment and skills in preparing materials for publication. Surveys graphic arts principles and their relationship to newspaper design and the total editing function. Studies layout, typography, design and printing requirements in planning and production of newspapers. Requires participation on student campus-community newspaper. 3 Cr.

CMC 325 Feature Writing (A). Prerequisite: CMC 224. Provides for the study and writing of various forms of feature and opinion articles for newspapers. Requires participation on student campus community newspaper. 3 Cr.

CMC 326 Public Affairs Reporting (A). Prerequisite: CMC 226. Instruction and practice in reporting of local, state and national public affairs and issues. Reporting the courts, politics, labor, finance, municipal, county, state and federal administrations and legislative bodies. Emphasis on interpretative and investigative writing that documents and analyzes critical events and questions. 3 Cr.

CMC 328 Editorial and Opinion Writing. Prerequisite: CMC 325. Introduction to, study of and practice in writing print editorials, opinion pieces and columns. Emphasis on identifying appropriate subjects and issues, audience analysis, the principles of persuasive argumentation in writing, including logic, organization, coherence and treatment. 3 Cr.

CMC 332 Public Relations Principles and Practices (A). Prerequisite: CMC 262 or permission of instructor. Covers the principles, practices, media and methods of public relations and information. Emphasizes public relations functions, communication and publicity techniques. Analyzes relations with such publics as the press, employees, stockholders, and consumers. 3 Cr.

CMC 334 Public Relations Methods and Cases (A). Prerequisite: CMC 332. Introduction to, demonstration in, and application of public relations techniques, tools and procedures to both hypothetical and actual public relations cases. Emphasizes action and communication techniques and practices used in public relations planning, production of informational and persuasive messages, and evaluation of action and communication activities. 3 Cr.

CMC 343 Broadcast Announcing (B). Prerequisite: CMC 242. Covers basic broadcast announcing with an emphasis on preparation and presentation of news, editorial content, commercials, public service announcements, and dramatic and narrative content. 3 Cr.

CMC 345 Radio and Television Writing II (A). Prerequisite: CMC 243. Provides specific focus on writing advertising copy for radio and television. Requires students to develop advertising and promotional campaigns, as well as scripts for corporate in-house video and audio projects. 3 Cr.

CMC 346 Radio Production (B). Prerequisite: CMC 243. Covers the principles and practices of radio productions while providing practical experience. Includes assigned projects on production of music, news and public affairs programming, and remote taping and audio editing. 3 Cr.

CMC 348 Television Production (B). Prerequisites: CMC 243 and CMC 346. Continuation of CMC 346. Covers the principles and practices of television production, with projects designed for television broadcast. Requires students to produce and direct both in-studio and field projects. 3 Cr.

CMC 353 Broadcast Sales and Marketing (B). Explores techniques and problems of modern broadcast sales and marketing. Requires projects to develop skills in broadcast commercial marketing and planning, and audience analysis. 3 Cr.

CMC 358 ENG Field Production (B). Prerequisites: CMC 348 and instructor's permission. Provides principles and practical experiences in single camera video production including electronic news gathering techniques. Includes numerous lighting, shooting, interviewing, and editing problems. Students finish the course with work that could be used in their video resume tape or portfolio. 3 Cr.

CMC 365 Newspaper Practicum (B). Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. Open to students serving on editorial or executive board of, or in designated positions of major editorial, advertising, managerial or production responsibility with, the student campus-community newspaper. May not be used to satisfy requirement for completion of major. May be repeated for maximum of 12 credits. 1-3 Cr.

CMC 366 Broadcast Journalism (B). Prerequisites: CMC 224 or CMC 243. Covers current practices and issues in radio-television news. Provides supervised practice in gathering, writing and presenting broadcast news. Emphasizes responsibility in news preparation and presentation. Requires reporting with audio and videotape recorders; broadcast of news programs over the campus radio station and campus cable channel. 3 Cr.

CMC 372 Film as Social Commentary (A,U,D). Explores the film as persuasive communication, the explicit and hidden messages of films, the inherent messages of specific film genres, and rhetorical analysis as a means to discover film messages. 3 Cr.

CMC 399 Independent Study in Communication (A). Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. To be decided in consultation with the instructor-sponsor and in accordance with the procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 1-6 Cr.

CMC 410 Speakers, Campaigns and Movements (A,U,W,D). Surveys significant historical and contemporary speakers, persuasive campaigns and rhetorical movements, with special attention to the introduction of women to the speaking platform and to historical and contemporary spokespersons and movements on behalf of racial and gender equality. 3 Cr.

CMC 411 Rhetorical Criticism (A,U). Explores methods of rhetorical criticism, application of methods of criticism to rhetorical discourse, and recognition of critical methods in critical studies. 3 Cr.

CMC 413 Nonverbal Communication (A). Explores multisensory communication codes for human interaction through channels such as paralanguage, space, time, body, and artifacts. Takes a functional approach considering purpose and context to determine the situational characteristics and codes. 3 Cr.

CMC 415 Public Communication in Administration, Business and the Professions (A). Prerequisite: CMC 316 or CMC 332. Covers communication in business and professional settings, business and professional community needs, and reading, understanding and interpretation for audiences of business and professional statements and data. 3 Cr.

CMC 417 20th-century Political Rhetoric (A,W). Surveys major 20th-century political speakers, campaigns and movements with emphasis on contemporary movements for racial and gender equality. 3 Cr.

CMC 418 Inter-cultural Communication (A). Explores cultural similarities and differences affecting communication and intercultural competencies for interaction between cultural groups and individuals along gender, ethnic, and national lines. 3 Cr.

CMC 419 Problems in Freedom of Speech (A,J,W,D). Covers the historical development of the freedom of speech law, theoretical foundations of freedom of expression, and problems and conflicts in freedom of expression. 3 Cr.

CMC 432 Public Relations Campaigns (B). Prerequisite: CMC 332. Focuses on the treatment of an organization's public relations and information, including situation analysis and research, program and campaign planning, development of communications materials and activities, and program management. Provides experience in planning and executing public relations campaigns and programs. 3 Cr.

CMC 438 History of American Journalism (A,U). Prerequisite: CMC 210. Covers the evolution and development of the media of American journalism from their beginnings in England and Colonial America to the present, and the dominant personalities which helped shape them, relating them to their social, political and economic environments. 3 Cr.

CMC 439 Professional Journalism Internship (B). Prerequisites: Senior status and instructor's permission. Provides a supervised practicum in professional journalism, public relations and mass communications in off-campus media and organizations appropriate to student's academic program. Also provides practical experience not otherwise available in the curriculum. Application for internship must be made during semester preceding internship. 3 Cr.

CMC 446 Advanced Television Production (B). Prerequisite: CMC 348. Students write, produce and direct advanced problems for television. Students work individually and in small production units. The prime focus is on the development and execution of professional television production problems. Students gain practical skills and finish the course with work that could be used in their video resume tape or portfolio. 3 Cr.

CMC 454 Advanced TV Directing (B). Prerequisites: CMC 348, CMC 446, and instructor's permission. Allows students to direct studio productions as part of campus television services and supervise studio set-up, recording session and studio strike. 2 Cr.

CMC 456 Professional Broadcast Internship (B). Prerequisites: Senior status and instructor's permission. Provides a supervised practicum in professional organizations appropriate to student's academic program. Application for internship must be made during semester preceding internship. 3 Cr.

CMC 460 Media Research Methods (A). Prerequisites: CMC 262 and junior or senior status. Explores concepts and techniques of media research, and introduces the strategy and content of research in mass communication. Covers techniques of research design, sampling, data collection, hypothesis testing, polling, data analysis and interpretations in mass media research. Allows for the application of research methods in restricted problems. 3 Cr.

CMC 463 Mass Communication and Society (A,U). Prerequisites: CMC 210, and senior status. Covers significant phases, issues and controversies patterns and problems in a field setting, and development of improved insight into one's own communication styles and techniques. Application for internship must be received by midterm of the preceding semester. 3 Cr.

CMC 477 Organizational Communication (A,U). Prerequisite: CMC 273 or 316. Integrates communication theories with practice of communication in organizations. Emphasizes communication roles and culture of organizations as a force in organizational philosophy and world view. Provides practice in diagnosing and improving organizational communication systems. 3 Cr.

CMC 479 Conflict Management (A,U). Covers interpersonal conflict and its essential characteristics; evolution of the study of social conflict; perspectives from which social conflict is viewed, including psychological, social-psychological, sociological, economic, political and mathematical; the sources, conditions and consequences of social conflict in a given social setting; and skills of conflict management. 3 Cr.

CMC 483 Communication Training and Development (A,U). Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. Introduces communication training with emphasis on practice in designing, facilitating, and evaluating a workshop presentation in an organizational setting. 3 Cr.

CMC 490 Special Studies (A). Subject matter to be defined by the instructor to address a topic or topics not covered in other communication courses. Additional information may be obtained at the department office. 1-3 Cr.

CMC 492 Theories of Persuasion (A). Provides an intensive study of classical and contemporary theories of persuasion and social influence. Gives attention to the application of theory to the practice of social influence. 3 Cr.

CMC 493 Contemporary Journalism Issues and Problems (A). Prerequisites: CMC 210, junior or senior status. An in-depth study of one or more instructor-selected contemporary issues or problems in journalism, public relations and/or mass communication. Issues and problems selected will vary with each offering and may be either conceptual or applied. May be repeated for maximum of six credits. 3 Cr.

CMC 494 Journalism Thesis/Project (A). Prerequisites: Journalism major, senior status. Open only to senior students in the journalism major. Requires students to undertake a major thesis or project with faculty guidance. Thesis or project is publicly presented and defended. 3 Cr.

CMC 495 Senior Honors in Radio-TV Production (B). Prerequisites: Senior status, and instructor's permission. Open only to students in the in the historical development of mass communication in the United States. Emphasizes contemporary media relationships with, and impact on intellectual, socio-political, economic and technological aspects of, culture and society. Considers daily and other periodical press, radio, television and film. 3 Cr.

CMC 465 Radio Practicum (B). Prerequisites: CMC 346 or CMC 343, and instructor's permission. Provides students with an opportunity to work in the programming, promotion, news, public affairs and technical aspects of running a radio station. Requires students to assume specific duties at the college radio station and a significant role in its day-to-day operation. 3 Cr.

CMC 466 Advanced Broadcast Journalism (B). Prerequisite: CMC 366. Provides experience in gathering, writing and producing news broadcasts for campus cable channel. Covers broadcast principles and practices with an emphasis on news and public affairs programming. 3 Cr.

CMC 467 Theories of Mass Communication (A,U). Prerequisites: CMC 210 or CMC 242, and junior or senior status. Examines and critiques the theoretical and research literature describing mass communication processes, message, audience and effects. 3 Cr.

CMC 468 Mass Media Law and Ethics (A,U). Study of the legal, regulatory and ethical aspects of mass communication and mass media practice. Emphasis on libel, privacy, privilege, contempt, fairness and obscenity in media law. Examination of government regulations and media self-regulatory codes. Consideration of ethical principles and precepts governing contemporary media practice. 3 Cr.

CMC 472 Group Leadership (A,U). Examines group processes, relationships and leadership in task-oriented groups, such as committees, task forces, teams, and problem-solving groups. Includes topics such as analysis of group processes, agenda planning, motivation of participation, conflict management, team building, and group leadership styles and techniques. 3 Cr.

CMC 473 Theories of Communication (A,U). Prerequisite: CMC 202. Covers classical and contemporary theories of human communication, research and practical applications of theory, relation of theoretical concepts to instances of communication behavior, and identification of salient communication theses. 3 Cr.

CMC 475, Applied Communication Internship I, (B). Prerequisites: Instructor's permission and senior status. Emphasizes applying communication skills in work environments, use of communication background to analyze communication broadcasting track. Requires students to produce and direct, with supervision, a radio or TV project for which they are solely responsible. Projects are publicly presented and evaluated. 3 Cr.

CMC 496 Contemporary Broadcast Issues (B). Prerequisites: Broadcasting major and senior status. Allows for a supervised study of selected contemporary issues or problems in broadcasting. Selected issue or problem may be either conceptual or applied. 3 Cr.

CMC 499 Independent Study in Communication (A). Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. To be decided prior to registration in consultation with the instructor-sponsor and in accordance with the procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement. 1-6 Cr.

 

Events

Sat, Apr 26

APA & Library Services
10:30 am - 11:30 am

Research & Database Searching
noon - 1 pm