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Undergraduate Studies Catalog 2001-2003

Department of Nursing

B361 Tuttle North
(585) 395-2355

Chairperson: Kathryn M. Wood; Associate Professors: Diane D. Elliott, Margie Lovett-Scott, Sheila A. Myer, Marcia A. Ullman, Wood; Assistant Professors: Gail Cardwell Hagenah, Kathleen Peterson-Sweeney, Mary Ellen K. Robinson, Patricia Lee Sharkey, Marcia A. Ullman, Ann R. Weitzel.

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Philosophy
The curriculum of the Department of Nursing is derived from the program's mission, purpose, objectives and organizing framework. The philosophy describes the faculty's beliefs concerning the purpose of nursing, the focus of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education, and the expectations for program graduates.

The philosophy of the Department of Nursing states that:

The faculty of the Department of Nursing at the State University of New York College at Brockport believes that education is a lifelong process which fosters the cultural, psychosocial, and intellectual development of the individual. The faculty fully supports the mission of the College, recognizing that students bring to the educational setting a diversity of abilities, motivations, experiences, and cultures. Accordingly, opportunities are provided at both the undergraduate and graduate level, which allow each individual to build on past knowledge and experience and to develop within the educational philosophy of the State University of New York.

The faculty believes that nursing is a profession, science, and art with the primary purpose of assisting clientsindividuals, families and communitiesto retain, attain, and maintain an optimal level of wellness through purposeful interventions. The faculty believes that clients are a composite of physiological, psychological, developmental, sociocultural, and spiritual dimensions. Professional nurses utilize the nursing process to manage care of clients through out the life cycle. Nurses work independently and in collaboration with other health professionals.

Nursing education utilizes knowledge drawn from nursing, the liberal arts, sciences, and humanities. Nursing curricula emphasize the development of concepts and skills which are essential to nursing practice, leadership and research, and fosters the development of critical thinking. Students are active, responsible participants in the learning process.

The faculty believes that baccalaureate education serves as the foundation for graduate study and continuing professional and personal growth. The master's program prepares specialists who will assume a leadership role in the delivery of healthcare to individuals across life's continuum.

Baccalaureate Nursing Program
Nursing is one of the most rewarding and challenging health care professions. The baccalaureate nursing program at SUNY Brockport prepares a generalist professional practitioner to utilize the nursing process and interpersonal skills in providing health care to clients, families and groups of all ages in any setting. The program also prepares the graduate to interpret and promote professional nursing and to accept responsibility for personal and professional growth.

The nursing program is accredited by the National League for Nursing and the New York State Department of Education. The College is a member of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. The program is designed to help students become scientifically and humanistically pre pared professional nurses, and to provide a foundation for graduate study in nursing.

Beginning practitioners are most frequently employed in either hospital or community settings. Hospitals offer challenging opportunities for the baccalaureate graduate as do long-term health care facilities. In the community, nurses are employed by public health departments, health maintenance organizations, out-patient clinics, voluntary health organizations, and hospices. Increasingly, nurses have opportunities to participate in entrepreneurial endeavors as independent health care providers. The armed services also offer excellent career opportunities for graduates.

The nursing curriculum involves classroom, field and clinical experience in nursing theory and practice. The curriculum uses a variety of teaching modalities. Students are expected to assume an active role in the learning process and are responsible for achieving learning outcomes. The focus on learner responsibility lays the foundation for the graduate's assuming accountability for professional practice and continued individual growth.

Achievement of a grade of "C" or better in all nursing courses is required for continued progress through the nursing program. Successful completion of the following courses is required for graduation:

  • NUR 321 Introduction to Pharmacology
  • NUR 328 Medication Administration and Techniques
  • NUR 329 Nursing: A Systems Approach
  • NUR 330 Foundations for Professional Practice for Nursing
  • NUR 331 Physical Assessment
  • NUR 336 The Childbearing Family and Women's Health
  • NUR 338 Client System Response I
  • NUR 340 Client System Response II
  • NUR 450 Issues and Trends Affecting Health Care
  • NUR 452 Management and Leadership
  • NUR 460 Complex Interpersonal Processes in Mental Health Nursing
  • NUR 462 Critical Care Nursing
  • NUR 464 Community Health Nursing
  • NUR 466 Maternal/Child Nursing
  • PRO 310 Research: Process and Critique

Curriculum and program requirements are subject to change as necessary. Students should consult department faculty for current information.

Clinical experiences provide students with an opportunity to apply theory in the following areas of nursing: adult health, mental health, child health, maternal health, critical care, and community health. Clinical experiences involve either day or evening hours, depending on the agency and the specialty area.

Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing
To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing, students must complete all nursing course requirements, maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0, and achieve a minimum grade of "C" in each nursing course. Students are also responsible for meeting the General Education requirements of the College. All degree requirements must be completed within five years after beginning the clinical component of the major.

Admission to the Program
Admission policies provide an opportunity for a baccalaureate education in nursing to qualified students in each of three groups: 1) students enrolled in this College, 2) transfer students from other colleges and universities, and 3) registered nurses. The Department of Nursing is limited in the number of students it can accept for clinical placement. Affiliating agencies require strict faculty-student ratios. Every effort will be made to accept well-qualified students.

Minimum Criteria for Admission:

  1. a cumulative college grade point average of 2.5;
  2. successful completion of prerequisite courses with a minimum grade of "C" (2.0) in each course;
  3. junior status with a minimum of 54 non-nursing liberal arts credits;
  4. current CPR (Basic Life Support for the Professional Rescuer) certification; and
  5. satisfactory references and health form.

Freshmen
The Department of Nursing will admit to the major students who have begun their college experience at Brockport with the stipulation that faculty will review student progress to date at the end of the fall semester of the sophomore year. To progress into clinical courses, students must meet the criteria listed above.

To document successful completion of these criteria, students should file a Progression Review Form with the Department of Nursing by December 15 of their sophomore year. These students' forms will be reviewed by the Admissions Committee early in the spring semester and students will be notified of their permission to continue in the major.

Transfers
Students transferring into the College should apply directly to the Department of Nursing for admission to the nursing program by January 15. Admission is contingent upon acceptance to the College and completion of the criteria listed above. Acceptance is on a space-available basis.

Registered Nurses
Registered nurses should also apply directly to the Department of Nursing for admission to the nursing program. Since clinical placement is limited, registered nurses are encouraged to apply as early as possible. Admission is contingent upon acceptance to the College and completion of the criteria listed above. Acceptance is on a space-available basis. RN students should note that a maximum of 64 credits may be transferred from the associate degree level.

For further information concerning opportunities for transfer credit and credit by exam, contact the Department of Nursing.

Required Prerequisite Courses

All students must complete the following courses (or their equivalent) prior to admission to the program:

 
Credits
Anatomy and Physiology I, II
6-8
Microbiology
4
Chemistry (inorganic with laboratory)
4
Nutrition
3
Statistics
3
Sociology
3
Psychology
3
Developmental Psychology (must cover entire lifespan)
3
 
Total:
29-31

Corequisite course: a course in ethics is required before graduation.

Prerequisite and corequisite requirements may undergo change. Contact the Department of Nursing for current information.

Student Health Requirements
Because of the special demands of the nursing program and the need to protect patients and students, junior and senior students in the nursing program are required to have a physical examination and prescribed lab tests prior to the start of the school y ear. The health form may be obtained from the Admissions Office or the Department of Nursing. A current, complete health form including the prescribed lab tests must be on file in the department by the date specified in the admission letter in order for the student to participate in clinical learning experiences. Nursing students are required to discuss with their nursing faculty advisors any health factors that may affect their capacity to perform as professional nurses. (Note: New York State Department of Health and individual health care agencies require additional protective measures prior to caring for patients. Presently, health care agencies require a positive rubella titer, a tine test or PPD, and Hepatitis B vaccination or its declination.)

Transportation
The majority of the clinical facilities are located in Rochester, 16 miles east of the SUNY Brockport campus. Transportation to and from clinical sites is the student's responsibility.

Uniforms
Uniforms must be purchased before the beginning of the junior year. Students accepted into the program are advised concerning arrangements for fittings and costs.

Requirements for RN Licensure
Graduates of this nursing program meet the education requirements for admittance to the RN licensure exam; however, there is a requirement that the applicant be of "good moral character," and a fee must be paid for the test. On the application for the test, the applicant is required to truthfully answer the following questions:

  • Have you ever been convicted of a crime (felony or misdemeanor) in any state or country?
  • Are charges pending against you for a crime (felony or misdemeanor) in any state or country?
  • Have you ever been found guilty of professional misconduct, unprofessional conduct or negligence in any state or country?
  • Are charges pending against you for professional misconduct, unprofessional conduct or negligence in any state or country?

If the answer to any of the questions is yes, the applicant must offer full explanation and establish his/her good moral character with the State Education Department.

Nursing Courses

PRO 204 Developmental Assessment (A). Investigates the physiological, psychological, sociocultural, spiritual and developmental influences on the client. Emphasizes the use of multi-disciplinary tools in assessing clients along the age continuum. Examines environmental forces that influence developmental outcomes. Investigates variables which will promote the optimal stability for each of eight stages of life. Examines normal lines of defense for each stage to retain the greatest internal resistance. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PRO 310 Research: Process and Critique (A). Introduces and examines the research process as it is evidenced in published professional journals. Includes the scientific method as utilized in research: problem formulation, literature review, research design and methodology, data analysis, and interpretation of findings. Presents and applies criteria for critically evaluating research to current published research. Emphasizes active learning throughout. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

NUR 321 Introduction to Pharmacology (A). Prerequisite: Level-one courses or instructor's permission. Presents drugs used therapeutically and their mechanisms of actions. Emphasizes classes of drugs, the most important representatives of the classes, and how they are used to promote client stability. Considers important side effects and drug interactions relevant to the role of the nurse in client care. 2 Cr. Spring.

NUR 328 Medication Administration and Techniques (B). Prerequisite: Admission to the nursing major. Open to pre-nursing sophomores with faculty permission only. Provides guided learning experiences designed to develop the skills necessary for safe administration of medications. 1 Cr. Fall.

NUR 329 Nursing: A Systems Approach (A). Not open to first-year students. Examines the four major concepts of the Neuman Systems Model: health, environment, client, and nursing. Focuses on defining and promoting client health, recognizing that clients may be communities, families, or individuals. Explores client variables of importance in a small and culturally diverse world. Includes consideration of the professional issues in nursing. 2 Cr. Spring.

NUR 330 Foundations for Professional Practice in Nursing (B). Presents both the skills and theoretical basis for professional practice in nursing with an emphasis on a systems approach. Introduces the components and use of the nursing process, basic nursing techniques, and principles of communication. Opportunity for implementation in the lab and clinical setting. 2-3 Cr. Fall.

NUR 331 Physical Assessment (B). Applies knowledge from the liberal arts and sciences in assessing the client. Includes history taking and systematic assessment of the person. Allows for the teaching and practice of examination skills and techniques in a lab setting. 2 Cr. Fall and Spring.

NUR 336 The Childbearing Family and Women's Health (B). Examines the response of clients to stressors experienced during the childbearing process as well as stressors experienced by women as a result of gynecological function and dysfunction. Utilizes the nursing process to promote optimal client stability. Provides an opportunity for implementation in the clinical setting. 4 Cr. Fall.

NUR 338 Client System Response I (B). Prerequisites: Level-one courses. Examines the stressors experienced by adult clients with emphasis on the surgical experience, problems with cell proliferation and immunity, along with alterations in gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and respiratory function. Places particular attention on the wellness-illness continuum and the role of the nurse in maintaining client wellness. Utilizes the nursing process to strengthen the client's line of defense in promoting optimal client stability. Provides an opportunity for implementation in the clinical setting. 6 Cr. Spring.

NUR 340 Client System Response II (B). Prerequisites: Level-one courses. Examines the stressors experienced by adult clients with emphasis on alterations in urinary, endocrine, neurological, and musculoskeletal function. Places particular attention on the wellness-illness continuum and the role of the nurse in maintaining client wellness. Utilizes the nursing process to strengthen the client's line of defense in promoting optimal client stability. Provides an opportunity for implementation in the clinical setting. 6 Cr. Spring.

NUR 358 RN to BSN (B). (RNs: Must be taken prior to or concurrent with first clinical course.) Helps registered nurses integrate the world of nursing as they have known it and the world of baccalaureate nursing. Offers the returning nurse student an opportunity to seek solutions to the challenges which arise when an adult learner returns to school and provides a forum for expressing feelings and concerns. 2 Cr. Every Semester.

NUR 380 Issues and Perspectives on Women's Health Care (A,U,W). Cross-listed as WMS 380. Analyzes and examines issues and needs related to the health of women from both an individual and societal focus. Includes women's changing roles and life styles, and traditional and non-traditional modes of health care. Includes such topics as the menstrual cycle, reproductive technology and feminist analysis of health care, presented from a biopsychosocial context. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

NUR 450 Issues and Trends Affecting Health Care (A). Prerequisites: Level-one and level-two courses or instructor's permission. Explores controversial topics of concern to the delivery of health care. Examines social, historical and professional trends affecting nursing practice and education. Poses hypothetical solutions to simulated problems facing new and experienced health care professionals. 2 Cr. Every Semester.

NUR 452 Management and Leadership (A). Prerequisites: Level-one and level-two courses or instructor's permission. Examines theories of management, organization, change and motivation. Addresses techniques for effective leadership, communication, conflict resolution, quality management and making decisions. 2 Cr. Every Semester.

NUR 460 Complex Interpersonal Processes in Mental Health Nursing (B). Prerequisites: Level-one and level-two courses. Examines the use of the nursing process in situations that require complex interpersonal skills. Focuses on the use of these skills in promoting the ability of clients to respond to stressors. Includes the provision of primary, secondary and tertiary interventions with clients who are experiencing violence, sexual dysfunction, crisis, and the major mental illnesses. Provides an opportunity for clinical implementation. 6 Cr. Every Semester.

NUR 462 Critical Care Nursing (B). Implements secondary and tertiary preventions for the critically ill client. Includes topics such as health problems seen in emergency departments, intensive care units, burn centers and trauma units. Provides an opportunity for clinical implementation. 6 Cr. Every Semester.

NUR 464 Community Health Nursing (B). Examines the provision of primary, secondary and tertiary preventions within the home health care and public health domain. Utilizes the nursing process to promote optimal client stability. Provides an opportunity for clinical implementation. 6 Cr. Every Semester.

NUR 466 Maternal/Child Nursing (B). Examines the multiple stressors in the critically and chronically ill child and their effects on the child, family and community. Examines the multiple stressors of complications experienced during pregnancy and childbearing. Utilizes the nursing process to promote optimal stability. Provides an opportunity for implementation in the clinical setting. 6 Cr. Every Semester.

NUR 472 Senior Preceptorship. Enhances skills in providing direct patient care to hospitalized patients and their families and facilitates transition to the role of new graduate nurse. Affords the opportunity to critically analyze issues of importance to acute care nursing. 1 Cr. Every Semester.

NUR 478 Problem Solving in Nursing (B). Focuses on problem solving and decision making in nursing. Emphasizes synthesis of knowledge as it applies to the care of clients with multiple needs. Examines test-taking skills, relaxation and stress management techniques. 2 Cr. Spring.

 

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