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Undergraduate Studies Catalog 2001-2003

Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies

23 Hartwell Hall
(585) 395-2994

Chairperson: Edward Udd. Professor: David L. Jewell. Assistant Professor: Joel L. Frater; Lecturers: Karen Bibbins, Arthur Graham. Adjunct Lecturers: Nancy Ballaron, Kirt Compton, Brian Emelson, Steve Kampf.

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Recreation and leisure is one of the most exciting and diverse human service professions. The field provides opportunities to work with all types of people in a variety of settings, addressing the potential and problems of leisure in modern society. Students studying Recreation Management will qualify for employment in a variety of settings including military, public, private, campus, commercial, tourism, and corporate-sector recreation. Students studying Therapeutic Recreation will qualify for employment in clinical, transitional, juvenile and community settings, such as hospitals; nursing homes; schools or residential centers; treatment centers; centers for physical medicine and rehabilitation; psychiatric institutions; and public, private and volunteer agencies. The Management and Therapeutic Recreation emphases provide students with academic and experiential opportunities that foster an exciting undergraduate experience and a challenging professional opportunity.

The Recreation and Leisure Studies faculty has a professional obligation to deny admission or continuation in the program to any student whose level of performance and/or personal characteristics do not adequately meet academic, professional or ethical standards.

All students majoring in Recreation and Leisure Studies must earn a grade of "C" or better in REL core courses and the REL emphasis courses in order to satisfactorily complete the REL major and to be eligible for REL 403: Practicum. Also, only courses for which a grade of "C" or better was earned will be considered for transfer into the program towards satisfaction of the major requirements.

All students during their first semester must take a writing assessment administered by the Department to determine writing ability.

All students must be certified in CPR and First Aid during the period they are to be performing their REL 403 internship.

All students must take the New York State Child Abuse Reporter Training. This is normally offered in REL 402.

Students changing majors to REL must possess at least a 2.00 GPA.

Major in Recreation and Leisure Studies  
To complete the major in Recreation and Leisure Studies, students must complete 25.5 credits of core coursework, 15 credits in an emphasis (either recreation management or therapeutic recreation), 18 credits of guided electives, and a 15-credit practicum experience.

Specific requirements are as follows:

Required Core Coursework (25.5 credits)
Credits
  REL 302 Leisure and the Individual and Society
3
  REL 306 Recreation for Persons with Differing Abilities
3
  REL 307 Applied Studies in Recreation and Leisure
3
  REL 308 Recreation Programming and Leadership
3
  REL 312 Management of Recreation and Leisure Services
3
  REL 402 Current Leisure Problems and Issues
3
  REL 410 Research and Evaluation in Recreation and Leisure Studies
3
  REL 414 Planning, Design, and Management of Recreation and Leisure Facilities
3
  PRO 421 Field Experience
1.5
  Total:
25.5

Recreation Management Emphasis (15 credits)
The Recreation Management emphasis prepares students for professional positions in the public and non-profit sectors, corporate and commercial recreation settings, and resort and tourism management. Students pursuing this emphasis must complete 15 credits from the following course list:

Select five courses from the following list
Credits
  REL 303 Corporate & Commercial Recreation
3
  REL 314 Principles of Tourism
3
  REL 416 Management of Non-Profit Leisure Services
  REL 430 Special Event Planning
3
  REL 435 Resort & Hotel Operations
3
  REL 440 Tourism Sales & Marketing
3
  Total:
15

Students with an emphasis in Recreation Management must take a minimum of 18 credits in Guided Electives. Note: This is not a comprehensive list, other courses may be substituted with the permission of your academic advisor.

GROUP I: Management Skills (maximum 6 credits permitted)

  • BUS 317 Intro to Management Information Systems (Prerequisite BUS 280, 285 or instructor's permission) (A,T)
  • BUS 345 International Business Environment (A)
  • BUS 365 Principles of Management (A)
  • BUS 375 Business Law I (A)
  • BUS 439 Retail Management (prerequisite BUS 335) (A)
  • CMC 314 Small Group Communication (A)
  • CMC 316 Interpersonal Communication in Business and the Professions (A)

GROUP II: Communications skills (maximum 6 credits permitted)

  • CMC 201 Public Speaking (A)
  • CMC 224 News Writing and Reporting (A)
  • CMC 312 Argumentation and Debate (A)
  • CMC 317 Interviewing (A)
  • CMC 332 Public Relations Principles (prerequisite CMC 262 or instructor's permission (A)
  • CMC 415 Public Communication in Administration, Business & the Professions (prerequisite CMC 316) (A)
  • EDC 418 Conferencing Skills (B)
  • ENL 308 Business Writing (B)

GROUP III: Marketing Skills (maximum 6 credits permitted)

  • BUS 335 Principles of Marketing (A)
  • BUS 432 Sales Management (prerequisite BUS 335) (A)
  • BUS 433 International Marketing (prerequisite BUS 335) (A)
  • BUS 434 Direct Marketing (prerequisite BUS 335) (A)
  • BUS 435 Consumer Behavior (prerequisite BUS 335) (A)
  • BUS 437 Promotional Policy (prerequisite BUS 335 & 435) (A)
  • CMC 219 Advertising, Mass Persuasion & the Consumer (A,H)

GROUP IV: Analytical Skills (must take one)

  • ECN 204 Introduction to Statistics (A)
  • MTH 243 Elementary Statistics (A)
  • PLS 300 Political Statistics (A,T)
  • PSH 202 Introductory Statistics for Psychology (A)
  • SOC 200 Social Statistics (A,T)

GROUP V: Accounting & Finance (maximum 3 credits permitted)

  • ACC 285 Fundamental Accounting I (B)
  • ACC 286 Fundamental Accounting II (prerequisite ACC 285) (B)
  • BUS 316 Introduction to Operations Research (A)
  • ENC 202 Principles of Economics-Macro (A)
  • ACC 489 Accounting for Non-profit Entities (B)

GROUP VI: Wellness Issues (maximum 3 credits permitted)

  • HLS 301 Health Behaviors and Wellness (A)
  • HLS 311 Nutrition (A)
  • HLS 409 Introduction to Psychoactive Substance Use & Abuse (A)
  • HLS 418 Alcohol Use and Abuse (A)
  • HLS 426 HIV/AIDS: Issues and Implications (A,C)
  • HLS 470 Health Implications of Stress (A)

GROUP VII: Issues of the Human Life Cycle (maximum 6 credits permitted)

  • EDC 301 Introduction to Counseling (B)
  • HLS 306 Contemporary Issues in Health (A,I)
  • SWO 376 Gerontology (A)
  • REL 372 Child Abuse (be aware of the 54 hour rule) (A,I)
  • REL 406 Leisure and Aging (be aware of the 54 hour rule) (A,I,W)

GROUP VIII: Misc. Issues Relating to Recreation & Leisure (max. 6 credits permitted)

  • SWO 379 People with Disability: Issues, Legislation, Intervention (A,I)
  • PLS 312 Public Administration (A)
  • PLS 318 State and Local Government (A)
  • PLS 435 Legal Rights of the Disadvantaged (A,I,W) (cross-listed: AAS 435 & WMS 435)
  • CRJ 343 Juvenile Justice Process (instructor's permission) (A)
  • CRJ 431 Crime Prevention (instructor's permission) (A)
  • CRJ 477 Family Violence (A) (prerequisites: Intro Sociology & Psychology)
  • CRJ 479 Victimology (cross-listed as WMS 479, at least junior status) (A)
  • CRJ 481 Women and Criminal Justice (cross-listed as WMS 481) (A)
  • CRJ 485 Issues in Juvenile Justice (prerequisite CRJ 343 or instructor's permission)
  • SOC 352 Sociology of Work (prerequisite any lower division sociology course (A)

GROUP IX: Leisure in Society (maximum 3 credits permitted)

  • ANT 301 Native Americans (A,I,C)
  • ANT 321 Culture Change (A,I)
  • ANT 331 Latinos in the USA (A,I,C)
  • ANT 342 Native American Culture History (A,C)
  • AAS 310 Urban Black Politics (A,S)
  • AAS 314 The Black Family (A,S) (cross-listed as SOC 314)
  • AAS 332 Urban Economic Problems (A,S)
  • AAS 370 Leadership Development I (cross-listed as EDI 370) (A)
  • AAS 371 Leadership Development II (cross-listed as EDI 371) (A)
  • AAS 428 Racial & Ethnic Relations (cross-listed as SOC 428) (A)
  • FCE 375 Latin-American Women (A,I,C,W)
  • FCE 420 Multiculturalism in the USA (A)
  • HST 387 Asian Survey (A)
  • SOC 304 Urban Sociology (A,I)
  • SOC 306 Social Change in the Third World (A,I)
  • SWO 321 Cultural Diversity (A)
  • WMS 315 Contemporary Black Women (cross-listed AAS 315)

Therapeutic Recreation Emphasis (15 credits)
The therapeutic recreation emphasis prepares students for positions as therapeutic recreation specialists in clinical, transitional and community settings. Students pursuing this emphasis must complete the following five courses:

 
Credits
REL 305 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation (prerequisite)
REL 302, corequisite REL 306 or instructor's permission)
3
REL 320 Leisure Education in Therapeutic Recreation
3
REL 407 Methods of Therapeutic Recreation (prerequisite REL 405)
3
REL 408 Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation
3
REL 412 Issues and Trends in Therapeutic Recreation
3
Total:
15

Students electing Therapeutic Recreation as their emphasis must be aware that this program is constructed so that you are eligible to sit for your professional certification examination after graduation. Therefore, nine credits of guided electives are prescribed (BIO 221 or BIO 321, PSH 334 & PSH 384). Additionally, all Recreation & Leisure Studies majors must take an approved statistics course.

Students in the Therapeutic Recreation emphasis are permitted to select only six credits of 18 required elective credits. Further, it is required that you take your emphasis courses in a prescribed sequence. You are required to take REL 305 as a prerequisite or corequisite for any other REL course work in Therapeutic Recreation.

Guided Electives for Therapeutic Recreation (minimum of 18 credits). Students must complete at least one course from Groups I and II, both courses in Group III, and two courses from Groups IV, V, VI (total of 18 credits). Both courses are required in Group III in order to meet National Council on Therapeutic Recreation Certification requirements.

GROUP I: Biological/Physical Sciences (one course required)

  • BIO 221 Survey of Anatomy and Physiology (A,L)
  • BIO 321 Survey of Anatomy and Physiology (A)

GROUP II: Analytical Skills (one course required)

  • ECN 204 Introduction to Statistics (A)
  • MTH 243 Elementary Statistics
  • PLS 300 Political Statistics (A,T)
  • PSH 202 Introductory Statistics for Psychology (A)
  • SOC 200 Social Statistics (A,T)

GROUP III: Psychology
(REQUIRED)

  • PSH 334 Abnormal Psychology (A)
  • PSH 384 Developmental Psychology (A)

(OPTIONAL)

  • PSH 332 Social Psychology (A)
  • PSH 436 Psychology of Aging (A)
  • PSH 484 Adolescence (A)
  • PSH 486 Psychological Disorders of Children (A)

Note: all psychology courses require a prerequisite of either PSH 110 or PSH 112.

TAKE TWO COURSES FROM THE FOLLOWING FOUR GROUPS.

GROUP IV: Human Services

  • ANT 313 Culture and Disability (A,I,W)
  • EDC 301 Introduction to Counseling (A)
  • HLS 306 Contemporary Issues in Health (A)
  • HLS 402 Women's Health
  • SWO 379 People with Disability: Issues, Legislation, and Intervention (A)
  • PLS 435 Legal Rights of the Disadvantaged (A)
  • REL 406 Leisure and Aging (be aware of the 54 hour rule) (A,I,W)

GROUP V: Health Related Issues

  • HLS 311 Nutrition (A)
  • HLS 402 Women's Health (A)
  • HLS 409 Introduction to Psychoactive Substance Use & Abuse (A)
  • HLS 418 Alcohol Use and Abuse (A)
  • HLS 426 HIV/AIDS: Issues and Implications (A)
  • HLS 470 Health Implications of Stress (A)
  • REL 372 Child Abuse (be aware of the 54-hour rule) (A)

GROUP VI: Sociology

  • SOC 300 Sociological Theory (A)
  • SOC 317 Prejudice, Personality and Culture (A)
  • SOC 331 Sociology of Mental Illness (A)
  • SOC 361 Sociology of Sex, Marriage and the Family (A,W)
  • SOC 371 Deviant Behavior (A)
  • SOC 372 Criminology (A)
  • SOC 428 Racial and Ethnic Relations (A)
  • SOC 465 Sociology of Aging (A)

GROUP VII: Miscellaneous courses that support NCTRC requirements

  • BIO 281 Elements of Human Biology (A)
  • CMC 273 Interpersonal Communication (A)
  • CMC 314 Small Group Communication (A)
  • EDI 325 Understanding the Exceptional Learner (A)
  • PES 325 Kinesiological Bases for Exercise and Sport (A)
  • PES 413 Human Growth and Development (A)
  • PES 445 Adapted Physical Education (A)
  • PES 461 Theories of Play (A)
  • SWO 376 Gerontology (A)

Practicum Experience Requirement (15 credits)
All students majoring in Recreation and Leisure Studies must complete a practicum experience. The practicum is usually completed during the fall or spring semester of the senior year. REL 403 Practicum (prerequisite: REL 307 for 200 clock hours or 15 credits; REL 307 for 180 hours combined with REL 421-426, totaling 200 clock hours.)

Minor in Recreation and Leisure Studies
The minor in Recreation and Leisure Studies is designed for the student whose work is likely to call for understanding of and skill in coping with leisure and recreational implications of extended life expectancies, retirement, the needs of citizens with disabilities, high technology, and the changing family structure.

Note: This minor is in revision, contact the department chair or academic advisement coordinator for current information.

Required Courses: (19 Credits)
Credits
 

REL 302 Leisure and the Individual and Society

3
  REL 312 Management of Recreation and Leisure Services
3
  REL 395 Leadership for Recreation and Leisure
4
   
Six credits from one of the following interest area pairs:
  REL 307 Applied Studies in Recreation and Leisure
3
  OR
  REL 313 Commercial Recreation
3
  REL 314 Principles of Tourism
3
  REL 307 Applied Studies in Recreation and Leisure
3
  OR
  REL 405 Philosophy and Theory of Therapeutic Recreation
3
  REL 307 Applied Studies in Recreation and Leisure
3
  OR
  REL 414 Planning, Design, and Management of Recreation and Leisure Facilities
3
  REL 307 Applied Studies in Recreation and Leisure
3
   
Three credits selected from the following:
  Any 300- or 400-level REL course (except REL 403 or 499)
3
  OR
  HST 330 History of Recreation and Leisure
3
  Total:
19

NOTE: Courses taken on a Pass/Fail basis may not count toward completion of the minor.

Double Major in Health Science and Recreation and Leisure Studies
The double major in Health Science and Recreation and Leisure Studies is for students interested in working in community, corporate, government, and military settings that offer recreation and wellness programs. To successfully complete the double major in Liberal Arts-Health Science and Recreation and Leisure Studies-Management, students must complete 28 credits of REL core course work, plus 18-19.5 credits of practica, nine credits in the REL specialization, and 30 credits from the Health Science required and by advisement "elective" courses. Plus, 12 credits of guided liberal arts by advisement "elective" courses. The specific requirements for this program are:

Note: The Recreation & Leisure Studies element of the double major is under revision. Contact the department chair or the academic advisement coordinator.

REL Core (28 credits) Credits
  REL 302 Leisure and the Individual and Society  
  REL 306 Recreation for Persons with Differing Abilities  
  REL 308 Recreation Programming  
  REL 312 Management of Recreation and Leisure Services  
  HST 330 History of Recreation and Leisure  
  OR  
  PES 350 History of Sport, Play, and Exercise  
  REL 395 Leadership for Recreation and Leisure  
  REL 402 Current Leisure Problems and Issues  
  REL 414 Planning, Design, and Management of Recreation and Leisure Facilities  
  Total 28
     
REL Practica (18-19.5 credits)  
  REL 307, PRO 421-426 (totaling 200 hours) 3-4.5
  REL 403 Practicum 15
 
18-19.5
     
REL Specialization  
  REL 411 Management of Leisure Resources 3
Plus six credits from two of the following:  
  REL 303 Leisure in the Corporate Sector 3
  REL 313 Commercial Recreation 3
  REL 314 Principles of Tourism 3
  REL 410 Research and Evaluation in Recreation and Leisure
Studies (Prerequisite: Introductory Statistics)
3
     
HLS Required Courses (30 credits)  
  HLS 301 Health Behavior and Wellness  
  HLS 306 Contemporary Issues in Health  
  OR  
  HLS 307 Consumer Issues in Health Care  
Plus 24 credits from eight of the following:  
  HLS 303 Environmental Health  
  HLS 304 Safety, First Aid and CPR  
  HLS 311 Nutrition  
  HLS 314 Family Life Science  
  HLS 409 Psychoactive Substance Use and Abuse  
  OR  
  HLS 418 Alcohol Use and Abuse  
  HLS 419 Human Sexuality  
  HLS 426 HIV/AIDS: Issues and Implications  
  HLS 470 Health Implications of Stress  
  OR  
  HLS 471 Childhood and Adolescent Stress  
     
Guided Liberal Arts Electives (12 Credits)  
The 12 guided liberal arts electives are selected by the student and faculty advisor. Completion of these guided electives will ensure that students meet the goals of the double major, including fulfillment of course requirements for a Liberal Arts major in Health Science and Recreation and Leisure Studies-Management.
The following are required, or students may select an advisor-approved substitute (students and advisor should note prerequisite and co-requisite requirements).
Group I
One of the following courses:
  BUS 335 Principles of Marketing
3
  BUS 365 Principles of Management
3
  BUS 366 Organizational Behavior
3
   
Group II
One of the following courses:
  CMC 201 Public Speaking
3
  CMC 224 Newswriting and Reporting
3
  CMC 316 Interpersonal Communication in Business and the Professions
3
  CMC 319 Propaganda and Persuasion
3
  CMC 312 Argumentation and Debate
3
   
Group III
One of the following courses:
  REL 406 Leisure and Aging
3
  SOC 465 Sociology of Aging
3
  PSH 436 Psychology of Aging
3
   
Group IV
One of the following courses:
  BUS 375 Business Law I
3
  PLS 312 Public Administration
3
  PLS 315 Government Regulations of Business
3
  PLS 318 State and Local Government
3
  PLS 320 Law and the Legal Process
3
   
Recommended Electives
  PEP 353 Administration of Intramurals
3
  PEP 360 Introduction of Sport Management Theory
3
  REL 372 Child Abuse: Causes, Costs and Confrontation
3
  HLS 402 Women's Health (Summer Only)
3
  HLS 490 Worksite Health Promotion (Summer Only)
3

Recommended Practicum Prerequisites/Certifications

  • CPR
  • First Aid
  • Lifesaving
  • Mandatory Reporting of Child Abuse
    (seminar, training, or course)

Recreation and Leisure Courses

REL 211 The Leisure Experience (A,S,D,E). Familiarizes students with the interrelationship between leisure and Western culture and society, and increases awareness of the effects of leisure. Covers the economic impact of leisure, leisure as a modifier of culture, life stages and leisure. 3 Cr. Every Semester. Not for majors.

REL 302 Leisure and the Individual and Society (A). Presents an overview of the recreation/leisure profession and its impact on the individual and society. Covers concepts of recreation and leisure through the study of theories of play. Discusses philosophical frameworks for play, recreation and leisure. Explores the sociological and economic impacts of recreation and leisure. Requires students to develop an operational philosophy of recreation and leisure. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

REL 303 Corporate Sector & Commercial Recreation (B). Prerequisite: REL 302 or instructor's permission. Covers the history, philosophy, organization, programming and financing of industrial recreation. Allows students to develop an operating policy. Includes a field trip. 3 Cr. Fall.

REL 305 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation (A). Prerequisite: REL 302, REL 308. Corequisite: REL 320, REL 408 or instructor's permission. Covers the process, benefits and function of therapeutic recreation, values of therapeutic recreation service, provision of service by diagnostic group and setting including medical terminology, and historical and professional development of therapeutic recreation. Requires field experience. 3 Cr. Fall.

REL 306 Recreation for Persons with Differing Abilities (A). Corequisite: REL 302 or instructor's permission. Provides both the conceptual framework and the specifics of application relative to integrated lifestyles for persons with disabilities. Focuses on assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating phases of providing integrated recreational services. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

REL 307 Applied Studies in Recreation and Leisure (B). Prerequisites: REL 302, 308, and 395 or instructor's permission. Investigates professional issues and problems through on-sight experiential learning or through directed research projects. Topics and sites are arranged through the instructor. Requires one or more written projects, depending upon the topic and scope of study. 3 Cr. Summer.

REL 308 Recreation Programming & Leadership (B). Corequisite: REL 302 or instructor's permission. Provides an overview of various recreation activities, examines frameworks for recreation programs, and evaluates recreation programs. Acquaints students with the theory, principles, and practices of leadership and group dynamics in recreation and leisure situations and settings. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

REL 312 Management of Recreation and Leisure Services (B). Corequisite: REL 302 or instructor's permission. Focuses on the management of a comprehensive recreation and leisure service system. Covers organizational behavior, marketing, human resources, operations, and finance common to public, private, commercial, and therapeutic sectors. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

REL 314 Principles of Tourism (B). Prerequisite: REL 302 or instructor's permission. Covers principles affecting tourism: the scope and magnitude of tourist attractions, services, facilities, transportation, accommodations, and the tourist. Examines travel motivations, demand for destinations, economic, socio-cultural and ecological impact, tourism planning, and tourism marketing. Requires site visits. 3 Cr. Spring.

REL 315 International Tourism (A,J,W,D,E). Examines the international tourism environment. Covers tourism growth and development and its costs and benefits as an international, economic, social, cultural, political, and environmental phenomenon. Covers trends in international tourism through the exploration of literature relating to international tourism destinations and looks at the role of various constituents in promoting international tourism. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

REL 320 Leisure Education in Therapeutic Recreation (B). Prerequisite: REL 302, and REL 308. Co-requisite: REL 305, REL 306, REL 408. An introduction to leisure education and its use in clinical and community settings. Covers concepts, theories, and practical issues relating to leisure education, including various models, assessment tools, intervention, leisure education programming techniques, and facilitation of leisure education groups. Diverse settings for leisure education services will be examined. Students will be given the opportunity for practical experience that will build on course content. Requires fieled experience. 3 Cr. Fall.

REL 372 Child Abuse: Causes, Costs and Confrontation (A,J,D). Informs students of the history of child abuse and its various forms in Western culture. Also allows students to learn of its causes, its costs in terms of dollars and human resources, and the means that society can implement to confront the issue. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

REL 402 Current Leisure Problems and Issues (B). NOTE: May only be taken in semester prior to practicum. Identifies and analyzes current leisure trends, problems, and issues that affect both the therapeutic and managerial segments of the leisure services profession. Focuses on the concerns of the present and their implications for the future delivery of leisure and therapeutic recreation programs, services, and treatments. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

REL 403 Practicum (B). Prerequisites: Eligibility for practicum semester, including completion of all General Education requirements, major core courses and appropriate specialization courses; also 200 hours of experience in recreation settings to be met through REL 307, REL 421-426, or through a combination of the above and other course-required field work. Provides a directed practicum in an approved leisure service organization. Also provides practical experience in a setting compatible with the student's chosen recreation option with evaluation reports by the practicum agency. 15 Cr. Every Semester.

REL 406 Leisure and Aging (A,J,D). Examines various aspects of aging as they relate to leisure in contemporary society, leisure needs of mature adults, services for elderly, and leisure pursuits in the subculture of the aging. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

REL 407 Methods in Therapeutic Recreation (B). Prerequisite: REL 305. Corequisites: REL 320, REL 408, REL 412. Covers Applications of the therapeutic recreation process (assessment, planning, implementing and evaluating) to planning comprehensive therapeutic programs in health and human service settings. Focus on clinical documentation and professional accountability. Requires field work. 3 Cr. Spring.

REL 408 Facilitation Techniques and Group Process in Therapeutic Recreation (B). Prerequisite: REL 302 and REL 308. Corequisites: REL 305, REL 306, REL 320. Emphasizes skill building in therapist facilitation techniques for healing modalities with therapeutic recreation participants. Focuses on individual therapy and group processes, and activity analysis, modality selection, planning multiple sessions, and designing program protocols for contemporary health care delivery across settings serving persons with disabilities. 3 Cr. Fall.

REL 410 (B) Research and Evaluation in Recreation and Leisure Studies. Prerequisites: REL 302, an approved statistics course and instructor's permission. Provides an introduction to research and evaluation in recreation and leisure. Focuses on the tenets of the scientific method as applied to research and evaluation. Emphasizes the use of microcomputers in investigation, data analysis, and writing process. Develops skill in styles and conventions of formal, scientific writing in recreation and leisure studies and services. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

REL 412 Trends and Administrative Issues in Therapeutic Recreation (B). Prerequisite: REL 306. Corequisites: REL 305, REL 320, REL 407 or instructor's permission. Investigates how current trends and administrative issues affect the delivery and advocacy of therapeutic recreation services. Emphasizes contemporary approaches to managing changes in practice in the emerging profession of therapeutic recreation. 3 Cr. Spring.

REL 414 Planning, Design, and Management of Recreation Facilities (B). Applies student's prior knowledge of recreation and leisure theory, philosophy, and programming techniques to out door/indoor facility planning, design, and maintenance. Provides planning skills, discussion of design issues, and maintenance management techniques. There is an emphasis on universal access. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

REL 416 Management of Non-Profit Leisure Service Organizations (B). Prerequisite: REL 312. Examines the history and background of the development of non-profit organizations, their missions, how they compliment public sector organizations, the process of establishing a non-profit organization and specifically management styles, funding and everyday operations. Topics covered include grant writing, fundraising, organizational structure, and personnel policies. 3 Cr. Spring.

REL 430 Special Event Planning (B). Prerequisite: REL 308. Corequisite: REL 314 or instructor's permission. Examines the special event planning process. Covers formulation of goals, needs assessment, selection and design of one-time or on-going event, planning, coordination, revenue generation, marketing, sponsorship, risk management, security, implementation and evaluation. Formats including fairs, festivals, sporting events, grand openings and different levels of managerial involvement will be discussed. Requires the planning and implementation of a special event. 3 Cr. Spring.

REL 435 Resort & Hotel Operations (B). Prerequisite: REL 314 or instructor's permission. Examines organizational structure and economics of the resort and hotel and the technical operations integral to resort and hotel management. Covers resort and hotel site development; resort and hotel operations; front office operations; budget operations; food beverage and restaurant operations; housekeeping; and staff management. Requires visit to destination resort and hotel. 3 Cr. Fall.

REL 440 Tourism Sales & Marketing (B). Prerequisite: REL 314 or instructor's permission. Examines the fundamental marketing and sales principles related to the tourism industry. Covers service marketing; destination marketing; professional marketing and sales organizations; consumer behavior; market segmentation; marketing research; tourism product, distribution, location, price; marketing communication; marketing and sales information systems; and the role of a manager. 3 Cr. Fall.

PRO 421 Field Experience I (B). Provides an introductory practicum experience for students who may work with adults with special needs in a recreational setting; e.g., adults with mental retardation, visual impairments, hearing impairments, or physical disabilities. Takes place on campus on Thursday evenings only. 1.5 Cr. Every Semester.

PRO 422 Field Experience II (B). Prerequisite: REL 421. Provides introductory practicum experience for students who may work with adults with special needs in a recreational setting; e.g., adults with mental retardation, visual impairments, hearing impairments, or physical disabilities. Takes place on campus on Thursday evenings only. 1.5 Cr. Every Semester.

PRO 423 Field Experience III (B). Prerequisites: REL 421, 422. Provides an introductory practicum experience for students who may work with adults with special needs in a recreational setting; e.g., adults with mental retardation, visual impairments, hearing impairments, or physical disabilities. Takes place on campus on Thursday evenings only. 1.5 Cr. Every Semester.

PRO 424 Field Experience IV (B). Prerequisites: REL 421, 422, and 423. Provides an introductory practicum experience for students who may work with adults with special needs in a recreational setting; e.g., adults with mental retardation, visual impairments, hearing impairments, or physical disabilities. Takes place on campus on Thursday evenings only. 1.5 Cr. Every Semester.

PRO 425 Field Experience V (B). Prerequisites: REL 421, 422, 423, and 424. Provides an introductory practicum experience for students who may work with adults with special needs in a recreational setting; e.g., adults with mental retardation, visual impairments, hearing impairments, or physical disabilities. Takes place on campus on Thursday evenings only. 1.5 Cr. Every Semester.

PRO 426 Field Experience VI (B). Prerequisites: REC 421, 422, 423, 424, and 425. Provides an introductory practicum experience for students who may work with adults with special needs in a recreational setting; e.g., adults with mental retardation, visual impairment, hearing impairments, or physical disabilities. Takes place on campus on Thursday evenings only. 1.5 Cr. Every Semester.

REL 470 Leisure in the United Kingdom: A Comparative Study (A). Provides an intensive and comprehensive study of the sociological and behavioral foundations of, and impact of, leisure in the United Kingdom. Consists of one week of intensive classroom experience and a second week of intensive hands-on experience in a leisure service setting in the Leeds, England area. Requires a comprehensive paper and additional fees. 3 Cr.

REL 499 Independent Study in Recreation and Leisure. Arranged in consultation with the instructor- sponsor and in accordance with the procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 1-3 Cr.