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Graduate Catalog

Department of Communication

(585) 395-2511

Chairperson and Associate Professor: Virginia M. Bacheler, MS, Syracuse University. Professor: Floyd D. Anderson, PhD, University of Illinois. Associate Professors: Donna Kowal, PhD, University of Pittsburgh; Katherine Madden, PhD, Pennsylvania State University; Assistant Professors: Matthew Althouse, PhD, Louisiana State University; Monica Brasted, PhD, Pennsylvania State University; Joseph L. Chesebro, EdD, West Virginia University; Michael Cavanagh, MS, Northwestern University; Alice Crume, PhD, Bowling Green State University; Carvin Eison, MA, Visual Studies Workshop, SUNY Buffalo; Hsiang-Ann Liao, PhD, SUNY Buffalo; Bill W. Reed, PhD, University of Michigan.

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The Master of Arts program in communication provides a broad survey of several discrete areas within the discipline, as well as an in-depth concentration in a selected area. Upon completion of the program, students will be qualified (1) to take up or continue careers in the communication professions or (2) to enter a doctoral program in communication. It is anticipated that students will enter the program with a broad diversity of backgrounds and with equally broad interests and needs. The program is constructed with the greatest possible flexibility to be responsive to this diversity. Graduate courses are offered in the areas of interpersonal communication, organizational communication, mass communication, and rhetorical theory and criticism. Because many communication graduate students are fully employed part-time students, all required courses in the program are offered as evening classes.

Admission
Matriculation in the Master of Arts in Communication program may be secured by application to the Office of Graduate Admissions. To qualify for admission, an applicant must submit the following as part of the self-managed application:

  1. transcripts of all undergraduate and prior graduate work, and
  2. letters of recommendation from three persons in a position to assess the applicant's potential for significant academic achievement.

At least a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average on a 4.0 scale and a "B" average in the undergraduate major and/or in undergraduate communication courses are normally required.

An undergraduate major in communication is not required. However, applicants without undergraduate background in communication are required to take their full programs of graduate study in communication courses. Those admitted as matriculated graduate students are expected to begin their study in the summer following their acceptance.

Degree Requirements
The Master of Arts in Communication requires the following:

1. Required credits of graduate study: A minimum of 36 credits of graduate-level course work beyond the bachelor's degree is required, with at least 24 credits at the 600 level or higher. All students must complete at least nine credits of research methods courses (CMC 600, CMC 601 or CMC 602, and CMC 797). At least 15 additional credits must be taken in seminar courses numbered 690 through 698. (Seminar courses may not be completed by directed study, independent study or by transfer credit). Finally, students must complete 12 additional elective credits selected by advisement.

2. Required Graduate Courses: The following eight courses, totaling 24 credits, are required of all matriculated graduate students in communication.

A. Research Core Courses
9 credits
   
a. CMC 600

Introduction to Research Methods in Communication (CMC 600 should be one of the first courses taken and is prerequisite to CMC 601 and 602)

3
b. CMC 601

Quantitative Research Methods in Communication: Surveys and Experiments

3
or

 

c. CMC 602

CMC 602 Qualitative Research Methods in Communication: Textual Analysis and Ethnography

3
and  
d. CMC 797

Research Project in Communication
[The research project is the culmination of the gradaute student's academic experience and therefore should be one of the last courses taken; departmental and instructor permission is required]

 

3
B. Seminar Core Courses
3
CMC 692 Seminar in Rhetorical Theory
3
CMC 693 Seminar in Organizational Communication
3
CMC 694 Seminar in Mass Communication
3
CMC 697 Seminar in Interpersonal Communication
3
And one of the following
 
CMC 690 Seminar in Special Topics in Communication
3
CMC 691 Seminar in Topics in Rhetorical Criticism
3
CMS 695 Semiar in Periods and Types of Public Address
3
CMC 696 Seminar in Media Studies and Criticism
3


3. Elective Graduate Courses: In addition to the eight required courses, students must complete at least four additional courses (12 credits). These courses should be selected by advisement from the options listed below.

a. Communication electives:

 

Course Description Credits
CMC 510 Speakers, Campaigns and Movements 3
CMC 511 Rhetorical Criticism 3
CMC 513 Nonverbal Communication 3
CMC 517 Political Rhetoric in the Information Age 3
CMC 518 Intercultural Communication 3
CMC 519 Freedom of Expression 3
CMC 532 Public Relations Campaigns 3
CMC 562 The Rhetoric of Film 3
CMC 563 Media and Society 3
CMC 573 Theories of Communication 3
CMC 577 Organizational Communication 3
CMC 579 Conflict Management Through Communication 3
CMC 583 Communication Training and Development 3
CMC 592 Theories of Rhetoric 3
CMC 691 Seminar in Topics in Rhetorical Criticism 3
CMC 695 Seminar in Periods and Types of Public Address 3
CMC 696 Seminar in Media Studies and Criticism 3

b. Independent study (CMC 699 Independent Study in Communication) permits gradaute students to study areas or develop projects not available through regular course work. Students are ordinarily permitted to include a maximum of three credits of independent study as part of their Plan of Study. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the graduate faculty.

c. Students with strong undergraduate backgrounds in communication, by advisement and with approval by the graduate faculty, may elect to take one or two courses in disciplines other than communication. Students lacking strong undergraduate backgrounds in communication must take their entire Plan of Study in communication courses. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the graduate faculty.

d. Students who wish to study film and video production, desktop publishing and related media may do so at the Visual Studies Workshop, located at 31 Prince Street in Rochester. For programmatic purposes, graduate courses taken at the Workshop are treated as communication courses and may be taken by all matriculated graduate students, including those without strong undergraduate backgrounds in communication. Students may take a maximum of six credits of course work at the Workshop. Such course work should be carefully selected in consultation with the student's academic advisor.

Time Limit
After matriculation, a graduate student has five years in which to complete all degree requirements. With sufficient reason a student can request a leave of absence and/or extension of this time limit.

Communication Courses

CMC 510 Speakers, Campaigns and Movements. Surveys significant historical and contemporary speakers, persuasive campaigns and rhetorical movements, with special attention to the introduction of women to the speaking platform and to historical and contemporary spokespersons and movements on behalf of social and gender equality. 3 Cr.

CMC 511 Rhetorical Criticism. Explores methods of rhetorical criticism; application of methods to verbal and visual rhetorical discourse; and recognition of critical methods in rhetorical studies. 3 Cr.

CMC 513 Nonverbal Communication. Explores multisensory communication codes for human interactions through channels such as paralanguage, space, time, body, and artifacts. Takes a functional approach considering purpose and context and to determine the situational characteristics and codes. 3 Cr.

CMC 517 Political Rhetoric in the Information Age. Critically examines significant 20th-century American political speeches and campaigns. Explores the ways in which individuals and institutions use media to exercise power and influence opinion through the use of verbal and visual symbols. Places special emphasis on representations of gender in political rhetoric. 3 Cr.

CMC 518 Intercultural Communication. Explores cultural similarities and differences affecting communication and intercultural competencies for interaction between cultural groups and individuals along gender, ethnic and national lines. 3 Cr.

CMC 519 Freedom of Expression. Critically examines the First Amendment by exploring its historical foundations and significant legal, political and philosophical arguments. Explores a variety of contemporary controversies concerning an individuals's right to freedom of verbal and nonverbal expression, including hate speech, incitement to violence and obscenity. Examines controversies in a variety of contexts, including the public speaking platform, print, television and the Internet. 3 Cr.

CMC 532 Public Relations Campaigns. Focuses on the treatment of an organization's public relations and information efforts, including situation analysis and research, program and campaign planning, development of communications materials and activities, and program management. Provides experience in planning and executing public relations and information campaigns and programs. 3 Cr.

CMC 563 Media and Society. Covers significant phases, issues and controversies in the historical development of mass communication in the United States. Emphasizes contemporary media relationships with, and impact on, intellectual, socio-political, economic and technological aspects of culture and society. Considers daily and other periodical press, radio, television and film. 3 Cr.

CMC 573 Theories of Communication. Covers classical and contemporary theories of human communication, research and practical applications of theory, relation of theoretical concepts to instances of communication behavior and identification of salient communication theses. 3 Cr.

CMC 577 Organizational Communication. Integrates communication theories with practice of communication in organizations. Emphasizes communication roles and the culture of organizations as a force in organizational philosophy and world view. Provides practice in diagnosing and improving organizational communication systems. 3 Cr.

CMC 579 Management Through Communication. Covers interpersonal conflict and its essential characteristics; evolution of the study of social conflict; perspectives from which social conflict is viewed, including psychological, social- psychological, sociological, economic, political and mathematical; the sources, conditions and consequences of social conflict within a given social setting; and skills of conflict management. 3 Cr.

CMC 583 Communication Training and Development. Introduces communication training with emphasis on practice in designing, facilitating, and evaluating a workshop presentation in an organizational setting. 3 Cr.

CMC 592 Theories of Rhetoric. Provides an intensive study of classical and contemporary theories of persuasion and social influence. Gives attention to the application of theory to the practice of social influence. 3 Cr.

CMC 600 Communication Research Methods. Examines different research methodologies and techniques and their application in rhetorical, interpersonal, and mass communication research. This course is a prerequisite for all CMC 600- and 700-level courses. 3 Cr.

CMC 601 Quantitative Research Methods in Communication: Surveys and Experiments. Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to design and conduct both experimental and survey research on communication topics. Requires students to design and conduct quantitative research prospectuses. 3 Cr.

CMC 602 Qualitative Research Methods in Communication: Textual Analysis and Ethnography. Provides students with knowledge and skills necessary to design and conduct qualitative communication research. Focuses on various methods of rhetorical criticism, textual analysis and ethnography. Requires students to design and conduct qualitative research prospectuses. 3 Cr.

CMC 691 Seminar in Topics in Rhetorical Criticism. Prerequisite: CMC 600. Examines the development of rhetorical criticism and application of methodologies to particular problems of criticism. 3 Cr.

CMC 692 Seminar in Rhetorical Theory. Prerequisite: CMC 600. Examines classical and contemporary theories of rhetoric, with an emphasis on the epistemic functions of rhetoric and on the role of rhetoric in public, social and cultural contexts. 3 Cr.

CMC 693 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Prerequisite: CMC 600. Examines organizational communication. Specific topic announced in advance by the instructor. 3 Cr.

CMC 694 Seminar in Mass Communication. Prerequisite: CMC 600. Covers mass communication theory, research and practice; development in contemporary mass communication theory; and the social and cultural contexts of mass communication. Specific topic announced in advance by the instructor. 3 Cr.

CMC 695 Seminar in Periods and Types of Public Address. Prerequisite: CMC 600. Examines in depth particular periods or movements in the history of rhetorical discourse such as colonial American Speeches, the women's sufferage movement, totalitarian movements, or contemporary political speaking. Specific period announced in advance by the instructor. 3 Cr.

CMC 696 Seminar in Media Studies and Criticism. Prerequisite: CMC 600. Examines various approaches to media studies and criticism, including technological determinism, rhetorical criticism, semiotics, social criticism, cultural studies and ideological criticism. 3 Cr.

CMC 697 Seminar in Interpersonal Communication. Prerequisite: CMC 600. Examines diadic, relational, family, small group, therapeutic, and/or negotiation communication. Specific topics will be selected by the instructor. 3 Cr.

CMC 699 Independent Study in Communication. Prerequisite: CMC 600. Designed individually through consultation between the student and instructor to suit the student's needs and interests, and the special competence of the instructor. Additional requirements may be established by the department. 1-3 Cr.

CMC 797 Project in Communication. Prerequisite: CMC 600. Entails a substantial research, creative, or utilitarian project that serves to integrate and focus the graduate student's program of study. Acceptable projects can include limited historical, descriptive, or experimental research; applied communication activities with a clearly defined end product; or creative work demonstrating an understanding of theoretical communication concepts. An acceptable project is determined through consultation between the student and his/her advisor and other graduate faculty in the department and in the student's cognate area. 3-6 Cr.

  The information in this publication was current as of December 2002 when the text was compiled. Changes, including but not restricted to, tuition and fees, course descriptions, degree and program requirements, policies, and financial aid availability may have occurred since that time. Whether or not a specific course is scheduled for a given term is contingent on enrollment, budget and staffing. The college reserves the right to make any changes it finds necessary and may announce such changes for student notification in publications other than the College catalogs. For the purpose of degree and program completion, students are bound by the requirements in effect as stated in the printed catalog at the time of their matriculation at SUNY Brockport. Inquiries on the current status of requirements can be addressed to the appropriate College department of office. Also refer to the Brockport Web site home page at www.brockport.edu for current information.

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