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Undergraduate Studies Catalog 2003-2005

Department of Chemistry

230 Smith Hall
(585) 395-2182

Chairperson: Thomas W. Kallen; Professors: K. Thomas Finley, Kallen, J. Emory Morris; Associate Professors: Kenneth D. Schlecht; Assistant Professors: Mark P. Heitz, Markus M. Hoffman, Margaret E. Logan; Lecturer: Carolyn J. Greene.

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Chemistry Programs

Chemists study atoms and molecules with the goal of understanding the composition, properties and changes that substances undergo. They identify individual components of materials found in nature, and measure how much of them are present. They also recombine atoms and molecules to deduce the rules of combination and to make new substances. Chemistry is also central to understanding other branches of sciencethe biological, earth, medical, and materials sciences, along with aspects of physics and astronomy. Knowledge of chemistry is crucial to understanding the manufacture and uses of many common materials such as metals, plastics, fibers, paper, glasses and ceramics; food products and food supplements, flavors and cosmetics; detergents and household chemicals; and pharmaceuticals, pesticides, paints, dyes and inks.

Chemistry is used in medical and criminal investigations, and in studying causes, effects, and cures for pollution. Finally, chemistry is central to authenticating, conserving, restoring, and preserving cultural treasures including rare books and documents, fine art, architectural works, and artifacts of the recent and distant past.

Students who major in chemistry and who choose appropriate electives are well prepared for advanced study in chemistry or related sciences such as biochemistry and molecular biology, computer sciences (with appropriate undergraduate work in computer science), engineering (especially chemical or environmental), environmental studies, forensic science, information science, materials science, neuro-science, pathology, pharmacology, physiology, or technical writing, and for advanced study in the health care professions: medicine, dentistry, and veterinary medicine. Students who major in chemistry are also well prepared to enter careers in:

  1. Commerce and industry: quality control, research and development, manufacturing, marketing and sales, and management.
  2. Education: teaching at the primary or secondary level or, after advanced study, at the university level.
  3. Government: laboratories, regulatory agencies and legislative staffs.
  4. Private and foundation-supported organizations conducting any of these kinds of activities.

Students at SUNY Brockport interested in the study of chemistry may choose: a major in chemistry; a major in chemistry with American Chemical Society Certification; a major in chemistry following the biochemistry track; dual majors in chemistry and another science, mathematics or computer science; chemistry and teacher certification; chemistry and business administration; or chemistry and a non-science discipline. They may also enter the 3+2 program leading to a dual BS in chemistry and chemical engineering. Some of these dual programs may require more than eight semesters and 120 credits to complete. Minors in chemistry can be designed to emphasize organic chemistry (synthesis and mechanisms), biochemistry, or analytical and physical chemistry. All minors require a minimum of 18 credits.

Students interested in the study of chemistry should speak with their chemistry instructors, the department chairperson, or the departmental advisor as early in their careers at SUNY Brockport as possible, since the study of chemistry is highly sequential. Some advanced courses require previous courses in chemistry, physics, or calculus.

Major in Chemistry
The student must earn a minimum of 34 credits in chemistry, complete three semesters of calculus and one year of calculus-based physics with lab.

Required Courses (34 credits)

The following courses are required of all majors:
Credits
  CHM 205-206 College Chemistry I, II
8
  CHM 301 Chemical Safety
1
  CHM 303 Quantitative Analysis
4
  CHM 305-306 Organic Chemistry I, II
8
  CHM 400-401 Seminar I, II
2
  CHM 405-406 Physical Chemistry I, II
6
  CHM 408-409 Physical Methods Laboratory I, II
2
  *Elective(s)
3
  Credits in Chemistry Total:
34
   
  MTH 201-202-203 Calculus I, II, III
9
  PHS 201-202 College Physics I, II
8
 

Credits in Math and Physics Total:

17

*Three credits of electives from the 300/400-level in chemistry, excluding Contemporary Issues courses (suffix I).

Students completing two majors may, by petition to the Department of Chemistry, substitute a relevant upper-division course in another natural or mathematical science for three credits of chemistry elective.

To make normal progress in the major, a student should complete CHM 205­206 in the fresh- man year, and CHM 301, 303, 305­306, PHS 201­202, and MTH 201, 202, 203 before entering the junior year.

American Chemical Society (ACS) Certification
The American Chemical Society, through its Committee on Professional Training, establishes a professional standard for the undergraduate curriculum in chemistry. This committee also evaluates undergraduate programs and approves those departments which meet its standards. The SUNY Brockport Department of Chemistry is on the list of approved departments. Students whose goal is employment as a chemist or entry into chemistry graduate programs are advised to complete the program outlined below, which meets the requirements of the Committee on Professional Training for certification. Graduates who complete the program are also eligible for immediate election to membership in the ACS.

ACS Certified Major in Chemistry
Required courses for the major in chemistry (first 31 credits listed previously), plus:

   
Credits
  CHM 341 Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
1
  CHM 414 Instrumental Methods II
3
  CHM 416 Instrumental Laboratory
1
  CHM 431 Inorganic Chemistry
3
  CHM 432 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
1
  CHM 467 Biochemistry I
3
  CHM 342 Advanced Organic Laboratory II
OR
CHM 470 Biochemistry Laboratory
1
  *Electives
3
  Credits in Chemistry Total:
47
   
  MTH 201-202-203 Calculus I, II, III
9
  PHS 201-202 College Physics I, II
8
  Credits in Math and Physics Total:
17

* Three credits of electives chosen from the 300/400-level in chemistry, excluding courses with the suffix I (CHM 372, CHM 373). This elective credit requirement may be satisfied either by an advanced course in mathematics or physics (for which calculus is a prerequisite) or, by petition to the Department of Chemistry, a relevant upper-division course in another of the natural and mathematical sciences. It is strongly recommended that the student also develop a reading knowledge of scientific German and proficiency in computer programming.

Major in Chemistry: Biochemistry Track
Credits
  Required courses for the major in chemistry (first 31 credits listed previously),and 31 additional courses listed below:
31
  CHM 467-468 Biochemistry I, II
6
  CHM 470 Biochemistry Laboratory
1
  Credits in Chemistry Total:
38
   
  BIO 201 Biology I
4
  BIO 202 Biology II
4
  BIO 301 Cell Biology (spring only)
4
  BIO 302 Genetics (fall only)
4
  BIO 415 Molecular Biology
3
  Credits in Biology Total:
19
   
  MTH 201-202-203 Calculus I, II, III
9
  PHS 201-202 College Physics I, II
8
  Credits in Math and Physics Total:
17

Minor in Chemistry
The student must complete CHM 205­206 and a minimum of 10 additional credits of chemistry chosen from courses having CHM 206 as a prerequisite. Normally 10 credits chosen from CHM 301, 303, 305­306, 405­406, and 408­409 are included in this program. Contemporary Issues courses (I) are excluded.

Chemistry Courses

CHM 111 Introduction to Chemistry (A). Prerequisite: QNT 110 or waiver for QNT 110. For persons who need to upgrade their chemistry skills in preparation for a technically related career or for enrollment in CHM 205. No prior knowledge of chemistry is assumed. Includes introduction to structure and bonding, the application of basic algebra to frequently used chemical calculations, and formula and chemical equation writing. Is illustrated with in-class demonstrations. Three hours lecture and demonstrations per week. 3 Cr. Spring

CHM 121 Women and Men Do Science: Explorations and Explanations (A,L,W). Prerequisites or corequisites: QNT 111 and ENL 112. A physical science Knowledge Area course with laboratory which deals with the methods of science in intellectual and practical spheres. Examines contributions of both women and men in the development of current understandings and explanations. Considers the proper roles of citizens and government as related to scientific questions. Provides practice in correct use of scientific terminology and standard English in written and oral communication. Three hours of lecture/discussion and two hours of labper week. 4 Cr. Every Semester

CHM 171 Elements of Forensic Science (A,N). Prerequisite: QNT 111 or equivalent math background. Shows how principles and techniques of biology, chemistry and physics are used to develop evidence for legal proceedings. Includes topics such as types and handling of physical evidence; finger prints; impressions; chromatography; spectroscopy, microscopy; toxicology; and serology (including blood and DNA typing). (Closed to students who have completed CRJ 371.) DOES NOT FULFILL ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY MAJOR OR MINOR. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. 3 Cr. Fall

CHM 205 College Chemistry (A,L). Prerequisite: QNT 111 or equivalent. Covers atomic structure, chemical periodicity, inorganic nomenclature, chemical bonding, molecular orbitals, molecular structures, properties of solids, liquids, gases, and solutions, chemical equations, and quantitative problems. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week. 4 Cr. Every Semester

CHM 206 College Chemistry II (A). Prerequisite: CHM 205. Covers strong and weak electrolytes, reactions, buffer systems, structure and bonding of coordination complexes, kinetics, homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium, thermodynamics, chemical equations and quantitative problems. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week. 4 Cr. Spring

CHM 260 Chemistry for the Health Professions (A,L). Prerequisites: QNT 111 or equivalent and HS Chemistry or CHM 111. Emphasizes the thoughts and actions of modern chemists as they seek a broader understanding of the molecular basis of living systems. Entails theory and mathematics appropriate for beginning students, directed towards an appreciation of the relationships between molecular structure and the ability to diagnose and treat disease. Develops the notion of decision making in the intellectual discourse of science. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week. 4 Cr. Spring

CHM 301 Chemical Safety (A). Prerequisite: CHM 206. Covers safety measures for prudent conduct of chemical lab work, hazardous properties of general and specific classes of chemicals, conditions for safe storage of chemicals, fire control and other emergency response measures. One hour lecture per week. 1 Cr. Fall

CHM 303 Analytical Chemistry I (A). Prerequisite: CHM 206. Introduces to analytical methods with emphasis on statistical evaluation of quantitative data and sampling strategies, analytical applications of acid-base equilibria, and chromatographic separations. Also includes a survey of classical volumetric methods, quantitative absorption spectrophotometry, and an introduction to ion selective electrode potentiometry. Three hours lecture and four hours lab per week. 4 Cr. Spring

CHM 305 Organic Chemistry I (A). Prerequisite: CHM 206. Presents the chemistry of carbon compounds: structures, stereochemistry, nomenclature, functional groups, acids and bases, reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy, and chromatography, with emphasis on synthesis and reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides and arenes. Three hours lecture and four hours lab per week. 4 Cr. Fall

CHM 306 Organic Chemistry II (A). Prerequisite: CHM 305. Continuation of CHM 305. Covers nomenclature, spectroscopy, synthesis, and reactions including qualitative analysis of alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives, amines, carbohydrates, and natural products. Three hours lecture and four hours lab per week. 4 Cr. Spring

CHM 341 Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (A). Prerequisite: CHM 306. Extends lab techniques and the scope of reactions encountered in CHM 305/306. Covers vacuum and fractional distillation, catalytic hydrogenation, organometallic reagents, phase transfer reagents, and other advanced experiments. Four hours lab per week. 1 Cr. Spring

CHM 342 Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (A). Prerequisite: CHM 341. Continuation of advanced techniques begun in CHM 341. Four hours lab per week. 1 Cr. Spring

CHM 372 Environmental Issues (A,I). Covers a wide range of environmental issues such as air pollution, acid rain, the greenhouse effect, pesticides, food additives and nuclear power. Also examines risk assessment methods, and the psychological factors and personal values that shape public attitudes. DOES NOT FULFILL ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CHEMISTRY MAJOR OR MINOR. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. 3 Cr. Spring

CHM 373 American Women Scientists in Contemporary Society (A). Prerequisite: Completion of Knowledge Area courses. Examines the contributions women have made in scientific fields. Also seeks to determine the validity of the claims of looming deficiencies of scientists in the nearfuture. Finally, assesses the roles that women scientists can and should play in meeting this problem. DOES NOT FULFILL ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY MAJOR OR MINOR. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. 3 Cr. Spring

CHM 399 Independent Study in Chemistry (A). Prerequisites: Junior or senior status, and 2.00 GPA overall with a 2.50 GPA in chemistry. To be defined in consultation with the professor-sponsor prior to registration. 1-6 Cr. Every Semester

CHM 400 Seminar I (A). Prerequisite: Departmental major's advisor or course instructor's permission; permission normally requires completion of 20 credits of the chemistry major. Includes attendance at seminars, critique writing, and participation in career and employment workshops. One hour per week. 1 Cr. Fall

CHM 401 Seminar II (A). Prerequisite: CHM 400. Continuation of CHM 400. Includes preparation and presentation of a technical speech by each registrant. One hour per week. 1 Cr. Spring

CHM 405 Physical Chemistry I (A). Prerequisites: CHM 303, MTH 203 and PHS 202. Covers the laws of thermodynamics and their applicat ion to chemical equilibria, phase equilibria, solution chemistry, electrochemistry and surface chemistry. Three hours lecture per week. 3 Cr. Fall

CHM 406 Physical Chemistry II (A). Prerequisite: CHM 405. Covers chemical kinetics, quantum chemistry, bonding, spectroscopy, statistical mechanics and photochemistry. Three hours lecture per week. 3 Cr. Spring

CHM 408 Physical Methods Laboratory I (A). Prerequisites: MTH 203, PHS 202, and CHM 206. Covers the statistical treatment of data, propagation of errors, graphs, and report writing. Requires students to conduct experiments using modern physical measurement techniques and produce written scientific reports describing and analyzing the methods and their results. Three hours lab per week. 1 Cr. Fall

CHM 409 Physical Methods Laboratory II (A). Prerequisite: CHM 408. Students conduct experiments using modern physical measurement techniques and produce written scientific reports describing and analyzing the methods and their results. Three hours lab per week. 1 Cr. Spring

CHM 413 Instrumental Methods I: Spectral Interpretation (A). Prerequisite: CHM 306. Covers proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance, ultraviolet and visible, infrared, and mass spectrometry data for the identification and structural elucidation of organic compounds. One hour lecture/discussion per week. 1 Cr. Spring Alternate Years 2003, 200

CHM 414 Instrumental Methods II: Quantitative Spectrometry and Electro-analytical Methods (A). Prerequisites: CHM 303 and 406. Covers strategies for chemical instrumentation and data acquisition, as well as theory and applications of spectrometric and electrochemical techniques for quantitative determinations and optimization of analytical parameters. Three hours lecture per week. 3 Cr. Fall

CHM 416 Instrumental Methods Laboratory (A). Prerequisites or corequisites: CHM 414 or both CHM 413 and 415. Covers the operation and application of electro-chemical, spectrometric, and chromatographic instruments with emphasis on optimization of selectivity, sensitivity, and resolution with real samples. Requires written reports. Four hours lab per week. 1 Cr. Fall

CHM 417 Computational Chemistry (A). Cross-listed as CPS 417. Offered by the Department of Computational Science. 3 Cr.

CHM 431 Inorganic Chemistry (A). Prerequisite or corequisite: CHM 406. Studies trends within the periodic table, atomic structure, ionic and covalent bonding models, weak chemical forces, acid-base chemistry, chemistry in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions, and coordination compound bonding, structure, and reactivity. Three hours lecture per week. 3 Cr. Spring

CHM 432 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (A). Prerequisite or corequisite: CHM 431. Explores use of classical synthetic methods to prepare coordination compounds. Applies advanced physical theory and instrumental methods to the problems of defining the composition, structure, bonding, and reactivity of these compounds. Four hours lab per week. 1 Cr. Spring

CHM 457 Geochemistry (A). Prerequisites: CHM 205 and 206, and GEL 101. Cross-listed as GEL 457. Applies basic chemical principles of thermodynamics, kinetics, and equilibrium to the investigation of common geologic problems ranging from crystallization of silicate melts to surface reactions on soil minerals. Focuses on laboratory exercises on application of good laboratory practices to wet chemical and instrumental techniques involving geologic materials. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week. 4 Cr. Fall Alternate Years

CHM 467 Biochemistry I (A). Prerequisite: CHM 306; a college course in biology is strongly recommended. Cross-listed as BIO 467. Covers the chemistry of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids and other biomolecules, with an emphasis on buffers, structures, experimental methods, main energy production pathways, biosynthesis, the deduction of structures, functional roles and mechanisms. Three hours lecture per week. 3 Cr. Fall

CHM 468 Biochemistry II (A). Prerequisite: CHM 467 or BIO 467. Cross-listed as BIO 468. Provides a continuation of CHM 467. Covers additional metabolic pathways, human nutrition, chromosomes and genes, protein biosynthesis, cell walls, immunoglobulins, muscle contraction, cell motility, membrane transport and excitable membranes and sensory systems. Investigates experimental evidence for the structures and functions of biomolecules. 3 Cr. Spring

CHM 470 Biochemistry Laboratory (A). Prerequisite or corequisite: CHM 467 or BIO 467. Cross-listed as BIO 470. Covers biochemical analyses, including preparation, separations and characterization of products from a variety of biological sources; and experiments with enzymes and experiments designed to measure changes inherent in the dynamics of living systems. Four hours lab per week. 1 Cr. Fall

CHM 480 Practical Chemistry Lab Pedagogy (B). Prerequisites: CHM 301 or NAS 468, CHM 303 and 306, and at least one semester as a chemistry lab assistant at SUNY Brockport (this experience carries no credit but is paid). For students working toward teacher certification in secondary chemistry and general science. Requires students to develop preparation notes, solutions, and reagents for lab experiments. Requires each student to develop a lesson plan, lead a class in the experiment, develop a grading scheme and do the actual grading for a selected experiment. Introduces troubleshooting of simple instruments. Requires a hands-on experience in the practical aspects of lab instruction. Does not satisfy the elective requirement for students not seeking teacher certification. 3 Cr. By Arrangement

CHM 499 Independent Study in Chemistry (A). Prerequisites: Senior status, and 2.00 overall GPA, 2.50 GPA in chemistry. To be defined in consultation with the professor-sponsor prior to registration. 1-6 Cr. Every Semester

 

The information in this publication was current as of December 2002 when the text was compiled. Changes, including but not restricted to, tuition and fees, course descriptions, degree and program requirements, policies, and financial aid availability may have occurred since that time. Whether or not a specific course is scheduled for a given term is contingent on enrollment, budget and staffing. The college reserves the right to make any changes it finds necessary and may announce such changes for student notification in publications other than the College catalogs. For the purpose of degree and program completion, students are bound by the requirements in effect as stated in the printed catalog at the time of their matriculation at SUNY Brockport. Inquiries on the current status of requirements can be addressed to the appropriate College department of office. Also refer to the Brockport Web site home page at www.brockport.edu for current information.

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