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Undergraduate Studies Catalog 2003-2005

Department of English

211 Hartwell Hall
(585) 395-2503

Chairperson and Professor: Robert J. Gemmett; Distinguished Teaching Professor: John Maier; Professors: David G. Hale, Evelyn Newlyn, Stanley S. Rubin; Associate Professors: Mark A. Anderson, J. Roger Kurtz, John J. Perry; Assistant Professors: Ralph W. Black, Miriam E. Burstein, T. Gregory Garvey, Michael Lackey, Greta Ai-Yu Niu, Anne Panning; Lecturers: Louis Hillman, Judith Kitchen, Teresa Lehr, Robert Seguin, Shawn St. Jean.

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For students who seek a general education for work in industry, for those who want to teach, for those who want to write, and for those who are planning professional studies in law, public relations, journalism, library science, advertising, publishingany field where effective use of the English language is essential and a broad humanistic perspective is neededmajoring in English is the first step in a career. As an alternative, students should consider the English minor, which encourages students to take courses appropriate to individual needs and interests. Students majoring or minoring in English must complete at least 50 percent of their major or minor course work (18 credits for the major, nine credits for the minor) at SUNY Brockport.

Major Specialties in English
Students who major in English must select a 36-credit major from one of two options: literature or creative writing.

Option I: Literature
The English Major-Literature focuses on English, American, and world literatures and affords students extensive practice in critical analysis and writing. The Literature track provides strong preparation for elementary and secondary teachers, for professional careers in business and law, and for the further study of literature in graduate school.

General Guidelines: Literature courses include the genres of poetry, fiction, film, drama, and the essay. Most majors take about 40­45 credits in English. In selecting their required courses, electives, or other courses beyond the 36-credit minimum, students are encouraged to construct personal concentrations in such areas as: American, British, or world literature; film studies; women writers; modern literature, etc., or to explore the diversity of English studies. Individual courses fulfill only one requirement in the major, and only liberal arts courses (designated by an A) can be used to satisfy the 36-credit minimum requirement.

Minimum Course Requirements:
Credits
  ENL 303 Introduction to Literary Analysis (minimum grade of "C")
3
British Literature
  One course in British Literature before 1800
3
  (Examples: ENL 202 British Literature I, ENL 411 Chaucer, ENL 416 British Renaissance, ENL 417 The Age of Dryden, Pope and Johnson, ENL 422 British Novel Before 1800)
   
  One course in British Literature after 1800
3
 

(Examples: ENL 203 British Literature II, ENL 419 English Romantic Writers, ENL 420 The Victorians and Others, ENL 423 British Novel After 1800, ENL 424 Modern British Literature, ENL 425 Contemporary British Writers, ENL 426 Modern Irish Writers)

 

   
American Literature
  One course in American Literature before 1900
3
  (Examples: ENL 204 American Literature I, ENL 429 Roots of American Literature, ENL 431 American Literature: The Transcendental Movement)
   
  One course in American Literature after 1900
  (Examples: ENL 205 American Literature II, ENL 435 Modern American Poetry, ENL 443 Contemporary American Poetry, ENL 465 American Film Comedy)
   
World Literatures and Cultures
  Two World Literature courses only one of which may be at the 100 level
6
  (Examples: ENL 165 International Fiction, ENL 353 The Bible and Modernism, ENL 367 African Novel, ENL 457 Women and Film, ENL 476 Post-Colonial Literature)
  OR
  One World Literature Course and one British or American Literature course which has a significant emphasis on cultural differences (Examples: ENL 235 Introduction to Afro-American Literature, ENL 237 Native-American Literature, ENL 357 Asian AmericanLiterature)
  Shakespeare (ENL 313 or ENL 314)
3
  Linguistics and Language (ENL 451, ENL 455, or ENL 481)
3
  Two elective courses in English at the 300-400 level
6
  ENL 472 Critical Approaches to Literature (prerequisites: ENL 303 and 9 credits of 300-400 level study in English)
12
   
  Total:
36

Teacher Certification Students: Students preparing for teaching in elementary schools are strongly advised to take ENL 305 Advanced Composition and ENL 482 Children's Literature. Students preparing for teaching in secondary schools should choose a concentration in literature and follow a specified set of courses as advised.

Preparation for Business, Law, and Public Service: Literature courses which emphasize psychological, social, and verbal analysis provide a solid basis for the type of critical thinking needed in professional positions, while courses in writing, business communications, journalism/publication, etc. provide a solid basis in communication skills central to these areas.

Option 2: Creative Writing
The English Major-Creative Writing allows students to follow a program of study in English which will enable them to explore their talents and develop their skills in a series of writing courses and related literature courses.

General Guidelines: Literature courses include the genres of poetry, fiction, film, drama, and the essay. Most majors take about 40­45 credits in English. In selecting their required courses, electives, or other courses beyond the 36-credit minimum, students are encouraged to construct personal concentrations in such areas as American, British, or world literature; film studies; women writers; modern literature, etc., as well as taking additional courses in writing or literature. Individual courses fulfill only one requirement in the major, and only liberal arts courses (designated by an A) can be used to satisfy the 36-credit minimum requirement.

Minimum Course Requirements:
Credits
  ENL 303 Introduction to Literary Analysis (minimum grade of "C")
3
  ENL 210 Creative Writing (the prerequisite for ENL 301 and 302)
3
   
Literature Requirements (one course must be in literature before 1900)
  One course in British Literature
3
  One course in American Literature
3
  One course in World Literature
3
   
Workshop Requirements
  ENL 301 Fiction Writers Workshop
3
  ENL 302 Poetry Writers Workshop
3
  ENL 403 Writers Craft (may be repeated once)
3
  One Advanced Writers Workshop (ENL 301 or 302 are prerequisites for the related Advanced Workshops; these 400 level Workshops may be repeated once)
3
  ENL 491 Advanced Fiction Writers Workshop
  ENL 492 Advanced Poetry Writers Seminar
  ENL 493 The Creative Essay
   
Two elective courses in English at the 300-400 level
6
  ENL 472 Critical Approaches to Literature
  (prerequisites: ENL 303 and 9 credits of 300-400 level study in English)
3
   
  Total:
36

Teacher Certification Students (elementary schools): Students preparing for teaching in elementary schools are strongly advised to take ENL 305 Advanced Composition and ENL 482 Children's Literature.

Preparation for Business, Law, and Public Service: Literature courses which emphasize psychological, social, and verbal analysis provide a solid basis for the type of critical thinking needed in professional positions, while courses in writing, business communications, journalism/publication, etc. provide a solid basis in communications skills central to these areas.

Minor in English
The minor in English allows students majoring in other disciplines to construct a program of study in English that will be appropriate to their individual interests and prospective careers.

English Minor Requirements
The minor requires 18 credits, including ENL 303 Introduction to Literary Analysis with a grade of "C" or better. Of the additional five elective courses (15 credits), at least two must be at the 300 level or above.

Students may wish to construct their individualized English minor around concentrations in such areas as American literature, British literature, film studies, women writers, cultural studies in literature, writing, and modern literature. It is also acceptable to simply choose five electives of interest.

Student Life
The Writers Forum provides exposure to significant contemporary writers and critics. The English Club offers a variety of activities, including the publication of student writing. Sigma Tau Delta, an international honor society, recognizes significant academic accomplishment. Prizes are available for student scholarship, and the writing of poetry, fiction, and the essay.

Study Abroad
Study-abroad programs sometimes are available. Information is available in the Office of International Education.

General Education Requirements
The following courses may be taken to meet the lower-division humanities requirement:

  • ENL 165 International Fiction
  • ENL 166 Literature and Culture
  • ENL 202 British Literature I
  • ENL 203 British Literature II
  • ENL 204 American Literature I
  • ENL 205 American Literature II
  • ENL 235 Introduction to African-American Literature
  • ENL 237 Native-American Literature
  • ENL 244 Women and Courtly Love

The following courses may be taken to meet the lower-division Comparative Perspectives (C) requirement:

  • ENL 237 Native-American Literature
  • ENL 353 The Bible and Modernism
  • ENL 366 Arabic Culture and the West

The following courses may be taken to meet the Diversity (D) requirement:

  • ENL 165 International Fiction
  • ENL 166 Literature and Culture
  • ENL 204 American Literature I
  • ENL 205 American Literature II
  • ENL 339 Writings by African-American Women
  • ENL 366 Arabic Culture and the West
  • ENL 367 African Novel
  • ENL 378 Women in American Literature
  • ENL 418 Significant Themes in British Literature
  • ENL 470 Women's Popular Culture
  • ENL 474 Caribbean Literature
  • ENL 475 Post-Colonial Literature
  • ENL 476 Magical Realism

 

The following course may be taken to meet the Science and Technology (E) requirement:

  • ENL 203 British Literature II

The following courses may be taken to meet the Western Civilization (G) requirement:

  • ENL 163 Literature, Arts, and Western Culture I
  • ENL 164 Literature, Arts, and Western Culture II

The following courses may be taken to meet the Contemporary Issues (I) requirement:

  • ENL 357 Postmodern Culture
  • ENL 359 Literature and Alcoholism
  • ENL 365 Asia and the West
  • ENL 367 African Novel
  • ENL 440 Literature of the American Family
  • ENL 442 Topics in Women's Literature
  • ENL 477 Issues in Science Fiction
  • ENL 485 American Folklore
  • ENL 496 Sex and Censorship

The following courses may be taken to meet the Contemporary Issues with Writing (J) requirement:

  • ENL 353 The Bible and Modernism
  • ENL 366 Arabic Culture and the West
  • ENL 367 The African Novel
  • ENL 439 Asian-American Literature
  • ENL 470 Women's Popular Culture
  • ENL 474 Caribbean Literature
  • ENL 495 Literature of the Holocaust

The following courses may be taken to meet the Upper-division Writing (U) requirement:

  • ENL 303 Introduction to Literary Analysis
  • ENL 305 Advanced Composition
  • ENL 339 Writings by African-American Women
  • ENL 403 Writer's Craft
  • ENL 418 Significant Themes in British Literature
  • ENL 427 Women in the English Novel
  • ENL 441 American Literature: 19th-century Women's Novel
  • ENL 474 Caribbean Literature
  • ENL 476 Magical Realism

The following courses may be taken to meet the Perspectives on Women (W) requirement:

  • ENL 205 American Literature II
  • ENL 221 Women's Diversity in American Literature
  • ENL 244 Women and Courtly Love
  • ENL 339 Writings by African-American Women
  • ENL 378 Women Writers in American Literature
  • ENL 427 Women in the Novel
  • ENL 439 Asian-American Literature
  • ENL 441 19th-century Women's Novel
  • ENL 442 Topics in Women's Literature
  • ENL 457 Women and Film
  • ENL 459 Film and Reality
  • ENL 470 Women's Popular Culture
  • ENL 495 Literature of the Holocaust
  • ENL 496 Sex and Censorship

 

Notes: ENL 112 or equivalent is a prerequisite for any ENL course above 200. Subtitles and contents of topics, seminar, genre, mode, theme, and workshop courses vary by semester. Consult the department for information concerning offerings in any given semester. Each semester the department provides a booklet containing instructors' descriptions of courses they offer. The booklet may be obtained in the department office.

English Courses

ENL 102 Fundamentals of College Composition (A). For students who need practice in expository writing skills. Provides intensive work in writing standard, edited English as preparation for entering ENL 112. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 112 College Composition (A). Emphasizes the development of written discourse with special attention to the writing process. Students generate, revise, and edit several short essays, as well as practice writing in ways that exercise their critical reading and thinking skills. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 163 Literature, Arts, and Culture I (A,G). Explores how major works of literature novels, short stories, and poetry explore human nature and society. Emphasizes the value of literature and the way it reflects the culture and ideas of the time. Explores how significant ideas and issues from conceptions of gender to assumptions about power politics, from religious beliefs to racist prejudices, from heroism to hedonism are explored in a variety of literary forms. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 164 Literature, Arts, and Culture II Surveys 17th- through 19th-century European developments in science, technology and artistic expression and the changes in Western philosophic attitudes that created the way of life we call "modern (A,G). " Examines relationships of the arts within the context of the intellectual, economic, and political trends which helped give American culture its shape and character. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 165 International Fiction (A,H,D). Focuses on short stories and novels from various cultures as vehicles for an examination of human nature. Assumes that, despite differences in nationality, race and culture, human beings share similar concerns, values, and attitudes that transcend those differences. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 166 Literature and Culture (A,H,D). Examines selected works of literature to illustrate comparative religious, political, scientific, and artistic issues as well as the conflicts inherent in individual, societal, and cultural values. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 200 Art of the Film (A,F). Provides an introduction to film as an art form combining visual, dramatic, and aural arts. Covers basic film vocabulary, elements of film art (camera, sound, editing), trends in film esthetics, and analysis of style of important selected filmmakers; includes screening of short and feature films. Required for Film Studies minors. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 202 British Literature I (A,H). Explores works from British literature written between 800 and 1750, including those of such writers as Chaucer, Shakespeare and Milton. Examines various styles, forms, and genres. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 203 British Literature II (A,H,E). Explores British literature written between 1750 and 1950, including works by writers such as Wordsworth, Browning, Yeats and Woolf. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 204 American Literature I (A,H,D). Surveys texts written in or about America prior to the Civil War. May include exploration and captivity narratives, Puritan writing, writing of the American Revolution, and major romantic authors such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Beecher Stowe. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 205 American Literature II (A,H,W,D). Surveys texts written in or about America from the post-Civil War era to the present. Introduces students to literary movements of the period such as realism, modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat generation, postmodernism, and the rise of ethnic American writing. May include writers such as Henry James, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, Thomas Pynchon, and Maxine Hong Kingston. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 210 Creative Writing (A). Examines techniques for writing poetry and/or prose; and requires students to critique and revise their own work. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 235 Introduction to Afro-American Literature (A,H). Cross-listed as AAS 235. Provides an introductory survey of the literature of people of African ancestry in the Americas. Acquaints students with major literary figures and significant historical periods. Discusses issues regarding the relationship between the writers and socio-political and cultural movements and of questions concerning the socio-cultural function that the black writer serves for his/her community. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 244 Women in Courtly Love (A,H,W). Studies the roles of women in literature of the courtly love tradition in European and British Middle Ages, and the influence of that literature on sex and gender roles at present. Requires reading, thinking, writing, and speaking. 3 Cr. Fall

ENL 301 Fiction Writers Workshop (A). Prerequisite: ENL 210 or instructor's permission. Provides for the mastery of the materials and techniques of writing fiction. Requires students to objectively criticize their own work and the work of others. 3 Cr. Spring

ENL 302 Poetry Writers Workshop (A). Prerequisite: ENL 210 or instructor's permission. Examines the substances and processes of writing poetry through contemporary study and objective work- shop criticism of student writing. 3 Cr. Fall

ENL 303 Introduction to Literary Analysis (A,U). For English majors and prospective majors. Provides skills needed to understand literature in English. Includes close reading of selected texts and study of literary genres, critical terms, and the relationship between text and context. Provides practice in writing literary analyses. Emphasizes skills of generating, rewriting, and editing the documented critical essay and other nonfiction prose suitable to the needs and future careers of English majors. Majors must earn a "C" or better. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 305 Advanced Composition (A,U). A workshop course. Requires frequent writing assignments that are usually peer-reviewed. Revision is expected. Encourages participants to think critically and solve writing problems creatively. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 308 Business Writing (B). Required for business majors. Allows students to develop word processing skills to prepare communications for the business world, including letters, memos, reports, and job applications. Emphasizes editing skills. Taught in the microlab: no previous computer experience necessary. Cannot be counted for the English major. 3 Cr.

ENL 313 Shakespeare to 1600 (A). Covers Shakespearean histories and early comedies. Explores the use of characters, plot, language, and dramatic convention. 3 Cr. Fall

ENL 314 Shakespeare after 1600 (A). Covers Shakespearean tragedies and late comedies. Explores Renaissance conceptions of tragedy and comedy, as well as Shakespeare's characters, plots, language, and use of dramatic convention. 3 Cr. Spring

ENL 331 Modern American Drama (A). Studies selected plays by 20th-century American authors, using a variety of critical approaches. 3 Cr.

ENL 339 Writings by African-American Women (A,U,W,D). Cross-listed as AAS 339 and WMS 339. Surveys literary representations in Afro-American fiction from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. Examines the degree to which sexism, cultural stereotypes and racism influence the portrayals and function of women in black American literature. Explores concerns with women's issues and the emergence of the feminist movement in America. 3 Cr.

ENL 350 World Literature I (A). Explores literatures of the world from antiquity to the early modern world, with considerable attention to texts outside the Western tradition. 3 Cr.

ENL 351 World Literature II (A). Explores literatures of the world since 1700, with a focus on texts outside the British and American literary traditions. 3 Cr.

ENL 353 The Bible and Modernism (A,J,C). Provides an interdisciplinary investigation of controversies surrounding the Bible in the modern world. 3 Cr.

ENL 354 The Bible as Literature (A). Provides an extensive examination of the design, moral, ethical and historical significance of the Bible, as well as its major literary forms, including short story, myth, proverbs, psalms, historical narrative and apocrypha. 3 Cr.

ENL 355 European Mythology (A). Studies Greek and Roman myths as background for Western culture, literature and fine arts. 3 Cr.

ENL 356 World Mythologies (A). Defines myths as prehistoric, preliterate narratives from an oral tradition and sees these narratives as fundamental in many ways, stemming from the earliest days of human thought, development and civilization. Considers myths from Africa, the Orient, American Indians, Europe, and South America. Examines what myths say about death, creation, fertility, and the hero. 3 Cr.

ENL 357 Postmodern Culture (A). Explores the interrelationship between various aspects of contemporary culture, especially the cultural influences of technology (chiefly computers) and the mass media (particularly television) on literature, film, and other arts. A fundamental premise of the course is that social conditions, changing beliefs about human society, international capitalism, and recent technological changes have led to changes in culture, lifestyle, even thinking, that can best be described as postmodern. 3 Cr.

ENL 366 Arabic Culture and the West (A,J,D,C). The Middle East is arguably the area of the world that is most volatile and least understood by people from Western cultural backgrounds who deal with that area. Provides an interdisciplinary exploration of perceptions of the cultural "other," concentrating on cultural products of the Arabic-speaking world. 3 Cr.

ENL 367 African Novel (A,J,D). Examines major authors and movements in the development of the novel in Africa. Emphaizes the texts themselves, but with attention to their social and historical contexts. 3 Cr.

ENL 375 American Novel (A). Examines selected American novels according to thematic, stylistic, and chronological patterns. 3 Cr.

ENL 378 American Women Writers (A,J,W,D). Cross-listed as WMS 378. Examines the ways in which American women writers address the particular circumstances of women's lives during particular decades. Explores the diversity of women's writing by including the works of best-selling writers, of women of color, of working class women and of radical experimentalists. Provides students with a historical, social and cultural context in which to locate the various works. 3 Cr.

ENL 388 Brockport Career Exploration Course I (B). Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. For a description of the BCEC, see Chapter V, Career Preparation, Special Programs. Interested students should pick up information packets and application forms in the Office of Career Services and meet with the Coordinator of Community Service before attempting to register. Registration requires a faculty member's signature. 3 Cr.

ENL 395 Introduction to Canadian Literature (A). Covers the development of Canadian literature in English from 1867 to the present. Emphasizes 20th-century writing throughout Canada, from the Maritimes to British Columbia, and places it within its cultural heritage, which often parallels that of the US. 3 Cr.

ENL 400 Writers Forum Summer Seminar: Fiction (A). Part of the Summer Writers Workshops, one-week intensive study. Devotes three-hour sessions to study of students' work, finished or in progress, and contemporary fiction criticism. Includes one-on-one meetings. May be repeated for credit. 2 Cr.

ENL 402 Poetry: Theory and Practice (A). Explores issues in contemporary poetic theory, study of selected poets, and close readings of texts. Intended for creative writers and serious readers. 1-3 Cr.

ENL 403 Writer's Craft (A,U). Allows students to meet with the director of the Writers Forum and guest artists and critics to discuss contemporary literature and the creative process. Contact the department for names of guests set to appear in the semester and other details. May be repeated for credit. 1-3 Cr. Spring

ENL 404 Writers Forum Summer Seminar: Journals and Autobiography (A). Part of the Summer Writers Workshops, one-week intensive study. For students and teachers at all levels, and others interested in techniques and uses of journal writing, methods of stimulating writing, and uses of autobiographical material. Requires in-class writing exercises and group sharing. May be repeated for credit. 2 Cr.

ENL 405 Creative Writing for Teachers (A). Explores how to stimulate writing and creative response to literature. Examines contemporary literature for models, and requires students to develop writing exercises, and produce and discuss individual work. Reviews and analyzes current material on the teaching of creative writing. 3 Cr.

ENL 407 Writers Forum Summer Seminar: Science Fiction (A). Part of the Summer Writers Workshops, one-week intensive study. Requires three-hour sessions to help those aiming at eventual publication in fantasy and science fiction. Mornings given to seminars and afternoons to writing and individual attention. May be repeated for credit. 2 Cr.

ENL 408 Writers Forum Summer Seminar: Poetry (A). Part of the Summer Writers Workshops, one-week intensive study. Requires three-hour morning sessions devoted partly to the study of contemporary poetry/poetics, but mainly to discussion of work finished or in progress. Includes one-on-one meetings. May be repeated for credit. 2 Cr.

ENL 409 Writers Forum Summer Seminar: Freelance Writing (A). Part of the Summer Writers Workshops, one-week intensive study. Covers the basics of freelance and feature article writing, finding and developing topics, methods of revision, survey of markets, preparation and submission of manuscript, and the author's rights and responsibilities. May be repeated for credit. 2 Cr.

ENL 411 Chaucer (A). Examines a variety of works by Chaucer. Emphasizes The Canterbury Tales. 3 Cr. Spring

ENL 412 Medieval British Literature (A). Studies medieval British literature in its principal forms: lyric, drama, allegory, and romance; its antecedents in Old English literature; its influence on 15-century writers; and, as time permits, its connections to European and Middle Eastern literatures. 3 Cr.

ENL 416 British Renaissance (A). Provides a study of selected poetry, fiction, criticism, and philosophy by British writers, from Thomas More to John Milton. 3 Cr. Spring

ENL 417 The Age of Dryden, Pope and Johnson (A). Requires students to read selected works from British literature written between 16601800, including samples from Dryden, Congreve, Pope, Swift, Defoe and Johnson. Examines some ways these writers resolve the tensions created by the competing demands of reason, tradition, and the imagination during this period. 3 Cr.

ENL 418 British Literature and Empire (A,U,D). . Studies the relation of British literature to Empire-building and Imperialism, with special focus on texts relating to the "high imperialism" of the late-19th century. 3 Cr.

ENL 419 English Romantic Writers (A). Covers major authors of the Romantic period (from Blake through K eats); examines significant figures in Romantic literature (such as Byronic heroes and Wordsworth's wanderers); and assesses Romanticism as a cultural phenomenon. 3 Cr. Fall

ENL 420 The Victorians and Others (A). Examines contributions of the era, such as the writings of Tennyson, Browning, Dickens and others from 1832 to World War I, to the development of British literary thought and artistry. 3 Cr. Spring

ENL 421 Seminar in British Writers (A). Provides a study of significant authors treated singly or in coherent combinations. Content varies, with appropriate subtitles provided for the individual course. May be repeated for credit with significant change in focus. 3 Cr.

ENL 422 The British Novel Before 1800 (A). Provides an historical survey of the British novel from the early 18th century to the beginning of the 19th century, with readings from significant novelists such as Defoe and Austen. 3 Cr. Every Other Year

ENL 423 The British Novel After 1800 (A). Provides an historical survey of the British novel from the early 19th century to the end of WWI, with readings from significant novelists such as Dickens, Hardy, and Forster. 3 Cr. Every Other Year

ENL 424 Modern British Literature (A). Provides a study of major British dramatists, poets, and novelists of the 20th century. Usually includes Shaw, Woolf, Lawrence, and Auden. 3 Cr.

ENL 425 Contemporary British Writers (A). Provides a study of major British writers in the later 20th century. Usually includes Amis, Osborne, Pinter, Golding, Lessing, and Ishiguro. 3 Cr.

ENL 426 Modern Irish Writers (A). Covers major contributions of Anglo-Irish authors to literature in English, including selected works of Beckett, Joyce, Synge, and Yeats. 3 Cr.

ENL 427 Women in the English Novel (A,U,W). Cross-listed as WMS 427. Provides in-depth examination of some of the great English novels, with some touching upon novels from other countries, to consider their thematic forms and functions, their literary significance, and especially what they reveal about the roles of women and attitudes to patriarchy. 3 Cr.

ENL 429 Roots of American Literature (A). Provides an intensive study of texts dealing with America between European contact and 1800. May include European fantasy writing, exploration and captivity narratives, Puritanism, texts of the American Revolution, and the origins of the American novel. May include representative authors such as John Smith, Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Samson Occum, John Winthrop, Benjamin Franklin, Mercy Otis Warren, and Charles Brockden Brown. 3 Cr.

ENL 430 American Literature: The Romantic Era (A). Provides an intensive study of the blossoming of American literature in the decades prior to the Civil War. Studies the growth of individualism and its impact on various groups of people by studying Transcendentalism, slave narratives, and women's novels. Features major authors such as James Fenimore Cooper, Emily Dickinson, Herman Melville, and Harriet Beecher Stowe. 3 Cr. Fall

ENL 431 American Literature: The Transcendental Movement (A). Provides an intensive study of the influential Transcendentalist cultural and intellectual movement and its theories of aesthetics, spirituality, politics, and culture. May include readings from Emerson, Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Theodore Parker, Jones Very, as well as important peripheral figures who were influenced by the movement such as John Humphrey Noyes, William Lloyd Garrison, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman. 3 Cr. Spring

ENL 432 American Realism (A). Examines American realism which, with its emphasis on the representation of everyday events and lives, chronicles the social fabric of late-19th- and early- 20th-century America by tackling issues such as industrialization, race relations, women's rights, immigration, and class struggle. May include writers such as Henry James, Charles Chesnutt, Frances Harper, Sui Sin Far, Theodore Dreiser, W.E.B. DuBois, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. 3 Cr.

ENL 434 American Literature of the Cold War Era (A). Examines the major literary movements in post-World War II America, paying special attention to the relationship between political, economic, and cultural changes both inside and outside the United States, and American writing. May include writers such as John Hersey, John Okada, Betty Friedan, Susan Sontag, Norman Mailer, and Allen Ginsberg. 3 Cr.

ENL 435 Modern American Poetry (A). Provides an investigation into the formative period 19101945 of 20th-century American verse, emphasizing significant figures from Robinson, Amy Lowell, and Frost to Cummings, Stein, and Eliot. 3 Cr.

ENL 436 Postmodern American Poetry (A). Provides an investigation into American verse written after the mid-20th century, emphasizing figures such as Berrymen and Robert Lowell, as well as their contemporaries Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton, and significant poets from more recent times. 3 Cr.

ENL 438 American Poetry (A). Provides a survey of important American verse from its beginnings to the 20th century, emphasizing representative poets such as Anne Bradstreet and Walt Whitman. 3 Cr.

ENL 439 Asian-American Literature (A,J,W,D). Explores Asian-American literature and culture both historically and thematically with an emphasis on the development of Asian- American literary voices and identities from the mid-20th century to the present. Includes major works of fiction, poetry, drama, prose, film, and critical and theoretical essays to facilitate discussion. 3 Cr.

ENL 441 American Literature: 19th-century Women's Novel (A,U,W). Provides an intensive study of the novel as a form of women's self-representation and cultural criticism. May include novels about family life, anti-slavery and temperance, slave narratives; historical novels; and representations of urban and industrial experience. 3 Cr.

ENL 442 Topics in Women's Literature (A,W). Cross-listed as WMS 442. Provides advanced study of women in literature and women's literature, focusing, for example, on some aspect of female lives, such as adolescence; on one or more female authors writing in a shared tradition, genre, or period; or on women writing on a common topic or from perspectives held in common. 3 Cr.

ENL 443 Contemporary American Poetry (A). Examines the unique character of poetry after World War II: aesthetic theory, significant themes, prominent contributors. Improves students' critical analytical skills via written assignments of varying character. 3 Cr.

ENL 445 American Modernism (A). Focuses upon writers of the first half of the 20th century who defined American modernism by consciously breaking away from artistic conventions of the 19thcentury through experimentation in language, form, style and a heightened awareness of writing itself. Writers may include Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, and William Faulkner. 3 Cr.

ENL 446 Seminar in American Writers (A). Provides a study of significant American authors treated singly or in coherent combinations. Content varies, with appropriate subtitles provided. May be repeated for credit with significant change in focus. 3 Cr.

ENL 451 Linguistics (A). Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. Provides a study of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and sociolinguistics. 3 Cr.

ENL 455 Sociolinguistics (A). Provides a study of language in social context. Analyzes problems in social dialects and communications, jargons, slang, bilingualism and language of social conflict. 3 Cr. Fall

ENL 457 Women and Film (A,J,W). Focuses on films by women. Considers the following questions: Have women filmmakers depicted the world differently from "dominant" cinema? What possibilities exist for forms of "feminine" film discourse that are truly different from dominant film discourse? What has been the history of women filmmakers? How many of these women have indeed tried to speak a different "language". 3 Cr.

ENL 458 Great American Film Actors: Selected Topics (A). Provides a close study of great actors of American film who have lent their unique talents to film tradition. Analyzes the artistic, social, personal, and cultural aspects of these actors and their careers. Focus and actors selected may vary, but may not be repeated for credit. 3 Cr.

ENL 460 Great American Film Directors (A). Using various critical perspectives, provides an in- depth study of major films of selected American film directorsHitchcock, Capra, Welles. Specific focus shown by subtitle. May be repeated for credit with significant change in focus. 3 Cr.

ENL 462 Significant Genres in Film (A). Explores significant themes and/or eras in film, for example: films of the 1950s, romantic couples, musicals, detective and Western films, and film noir in cultural context. Specific topics shown by subtitle. May be repeated for credit with significant change in topic. 3 Cr.

ENL 463 Great International Film Directors (A). Using a variety of critical perspectives, provides for an in-depth study of major films of selected international film directors. Normally focuses on two or three directors such as Fellini, Ingmar Bergman, Truffaut, Renoir, Eisenstein, Sagawa, and others. Specific focus shown by subtitle; may be repeated for credit with significant change in focus. 3 Cr.

ENL 464 The Film Star (A). Focuses on the contribution of the actor to the film, differences between acting for silent and for sound films, and differences in acting on stage and in film. Screens films and provides for discussion. 3 Cr.

ENL 465 American Film Comedy (A). Surveys the development of American comic style in film from the silent era to today. Requires screenings of films from Mack Sennett's "Keystone" slapstick to Woody Allen's cerebral comedy. Explores the function(s) of comedy, the theory of laughter, comic visions of America, and personal style vs. genre in comedy. 3 Cr.

ENL 466 Fantasy and Romance (A). Provides a study of an important literary mode through reading, analysis, and creation of selected works of fantasy and romance. May include readings such as Arthurian tales, Utopia, The Lord of the Rings, etc. 3 Cr.

ENL 467 Tragedy as a Genre (A). Investigates tragedy as both a literary genre and a way of interpreting the world. Considers both personal and cosmic aspects of tragedy in literary works from differing eras and cultures. 3 Cr.

ENL 470 Women's Popular Culture (A,J,W,D). Cross-listed as WMS 470. Explores women's popular culture to engender a cultural analysis. Considers such questions as how women's popular culture responds to women's psychosocial needs and how it functions within the dominant culture. Examines samples of the fiction and films that represent 20th-century American women's popular culture. 3 Cr.

ENL 472 Critical Approaches to Literature (A). Prerequisites: ENL 303 or equivalent and nine credits in literature and/or film courses. Requires students to analyze literary texts' form and content, write papers of analysis from at least three literary perspectives, classify and describe perspectives of various critics, and define critical terms. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 474 Caribbean Literature Surveys 20th-century literature from the Caribbean, including drama, poetry, and narrative (A,J,D). Includes Anglophone writers as well as non-English works in translation. Examines literature in the context of historical and cultural issues such as the nature of Caribbean identity, the role of language, and the reconstruction of history. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 475 Post-Colonial Literature (A,J,D). Surveys some of the most lively literature from areas of the world that were formerly European colonies: the Caribbean, Africa, and South Asia in particular. Introduces what is sometimes called the "post-Colonial condition," exploring what it is and how writers have responded to it. 3 Cr.

ENL 476 Magical Realism (A,U,D). Introduces the important 20th-century literary movement known as magical realism. Examines its roots in Latin America as well as its adoption in other locations, with particular attention to the historical context in each case. 3 Cr.

ENL 477 Issues in Science Fiction (A). Covers significant developments in the history of speculative and science fiction. Explores major themes such as sex, science and prejudice. Includes representative authors such as Wells, Asimov, Heinlein and Le Guin. 3 Cr.

ENL 481 English Grammar (A). Provides a study of a variety of options writers have in applying transformational rules when they generate sentences. Also provides appropriate terminology for grammatical form and function. Introduces con temporary grammatical theories and analyzes passages of prose and poetry to illustrate the relationship between rhetoric and syntactic choice. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 482 Children's Literature (A). Explores the conventions of children's literature; development of genres of children's literature; and biographical, bibliographical and critical resources in the field. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 484 Young Adult Literature (A). Examines the needs of the young adult reader. Surveys genre literature as well as literature in content areas. 3 Cr.

ENL 491 Advanced Fiction Writers Workshop (A). Prerequisite: ENL 301. Focuses on the writing of fiction and the applied criticism of fiction. Requires students to bring manuscript to a polished state of form, style and content. May be repeated for credit. 3 Cr. Fall

ENL 492 Advanced Poetry Writers Seminar (A). Prerequisite: ENL 302. Focuses on original poetry writing and applied criticism. Requires intensive critical discussion, revision, and some consideration of work by selected contemporaries. May be repeated for credit. 3 Cr. Spring

ENL 493 The Creative Essay (A). Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. Primarily a writing course in which students "workshop" essays. Explores the historical evolution of the essay and its new forms. Requires students to read a variety of essays and create their own. May be repeated for credit. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENL 495 Literature of the Holocaust (A,J,W). Provides for readings and discussions concerning Hitler's attempted destruction of the European Jews, both fiction and non-fiction, including the work of survivors and victims. Incorporates esthetic, moral, and political perspectives, with special emphasis on the relevance for our time. 3 Cr.

ENL 496 Sex and Censorship (A,I,W). Cross-listed as WMS 496. Considers the expression of sexual themesand censorship of themin contemporary literature, film and media. Includes topics such as the erotic in art, definitions of pornography and obscenity, evolution of censorship standards and practices, the Hollywood Code, the US Commission on Obscenity and Pornography (1970) and its critics, and recent feminist perspectives. 3 Cr.

ENL 499 Independent Study in English (A). To be defined in consultation with the instructor-sponsor in accordance with the procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 3 Cr.

The information in this publication was current as of December 2002 when the text was compiled. Changes, including but not restricted to, tuition and fees, course descriptions, degree and program requirements, policies, and financial aid availability may have occurred since that time. Whether or not a specific course is scheduled for a given term is contingent on enrollment, budget and staffing. The college reserves the right to make any changes it finds necessary and may announce such changes for student notification in publications other than the College catalogs. For the purpose of degree and program completion, students are bound by the requirements in effect as stated in the printed catalog at the time of their matriculation at SUNY Brockport. Inquiries on the current status of requirements can be addressed to the appropriate College department of office. Also refer to the Brockport Web site home page at www.brockport.edu for current information.