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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

(585) 395-2205

Chairperson: Vacant at time of publication; Distinguished Service Professors: Betsy Ann Balzano, PhD, Florida State University; Morris I. Beers, PhD, George Peabody College for Teachers (Vanderbilt University); Dean of Professions and Professor: Christine E. Murray, PhD, Syracuse University; Professor: Thomas R. Giblin, EdD, University of Florida; Associate Professors: Moira Fallon, PhD, University of New Mexico; Sue Novinger, PhD, University of Missouri-Columbia; Scott Robinson, PhD, Florida State University; Lynae Sakshaug, PhD, North Carolina State University; Conrad Van Voorst, EdD, Vanderbilt University; Peter Veronesi, PhD, University of Iowa; Assistant Professors: Amy Barnhill, PhD, University of Missouri-Kansas City; Mary Corey, PhD, University of Rochester; Donald Halquist, PhD, University of New Mexico; Karen Hurlbutt, PhD, University of North Dakota; Lecturers: Annette Hauenstein, CAS, MSEd, SUNY College at Brockport; Linda Kramer-Schlosser, PhD, State University of Florida; Director of Field Experience and Certification: Diane Maurer, MSEd, SUNY College at Buffalo; Assistant Coordinator of Field Experience: Candace Tyler-Herrenkohl, MSEd, Nazareth College; Coordinator for Certification and Graduate Advisement: Sandra E. Selden, MS, Roberts Wesleyan College; Coordinator for Undergraduate Certification Programs: Nancy Di Pasquale, MS, SUNY College at Buffalo.

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Background
In New York state, the field of teacher education has recently undergone an era of unprecedented change. Effective February 2, 2004, both the educational requirements for teaching certificates and the certificate titles themselves changed.

First level certificates issued prior to February 2, 2004 were called provisional certificates. Current holders of a provisional certificate must complete the requirements for a permanent certificate. As of February 2, 2004, the State Education Department issues initial certificates as the first level certificate. Individuals holding an initial certificate must complete the requirements for the professional certificate.

Both the old and new certificate titles are used at various places in this catalog since graduate programs are available at SUNY Brockport for students to whom the pre-February 2004 regulations apply, as well for those bound by the post-February 2004 regulations.

Department Programs - Overview

The Department of Education and Human Development currently offers MS in Education options for three groups of students:

  • those who hold a valid provisional or initial certificate, and seek permanent or professional certification in the same title area;
  • those who hold a valid provisional or initial certificate, and seek an additional initial certification area or extension as well as the permanent or professional certification; and
  • those who have no certification, and seek the initial and/or professional certifications.

MS in Education Programs (30-36 credits)
The department's 30-, 33- and 36-credit programs are designed for those students who already possess provisional or initial certification, usually in the area in which the degree is being sought (see section on Admission Requirements for exceptions). These programs provide the master's degree that is required in New York state for permanent or professional certification. Please note that there are additional New York state requirements for permanent and professional certification, including teaching experience and testing requirements (permanent only).

The Department of Education and Human Development currently offers the following 30-, 33- and 36-credit programs:

  • Adolescence English
  • Adolescence Mathematics
  • Adolescence Science
  • Adolescence Social Studies
  • Bilingual Education
  • Childhood Curriculum Specialist
  • Childhood Literacy
  • Childhood Special Education

Collaborative Internship Master's Program (CIMP)
This program is a variation on the Childhood Curriculum Specialist program and offers teachers with provisional or initial certification the opportunity to learn the philosophy, curriculum, and instructional practices of a school district while simultaneously engaging in teaching AND full-time graduate study. Interns are selected from recommended program applicants in cooperation with the participating school district(s). The program is an academic yearlong program in which interns have a 15 clock-hour per week teaching responsibility. (However, interns do not displace faculty members.) The remaining time is devoted to formal graduate study that culminates in the master's degree. Selected interns receive tuition support, which is dependent on grant funding. Notification of CIMP acceptance is usually given in late spring.

Applications for the CIMP program may be requested either from the Office of Graduate Admissions, (585) 395-5465, at the time a College application for graduate study is requested, or from the department's graduate secretary at (585) 395-5060.

Alternate MS in Education (54 credits)
The 54-credit alternate programs lead to an MS in Education and are specifically designed for those who do not possess any certification and who have little or no professional education background. These programs lead to initial certification and also provide the master's degree that is required in New York state for professional certification. Please note that there are additional New York state requirements for professional certification, including teaching experience. (Please contact the Office of Teacher Certification at SUNY Brockport, your local BOCES, or the New York State Department of Education for additional certification information.)

The Department of Education and Human Development currently offers the following 54-credit alternate programs. All are in the area of adolescence education (grades 7-12) and each includes an extension to middle childhood education (grades 5-6) certification:

  • Adolescence English
  • Adolescence Mathematics
  • Adolescence Science (biology, chemistry, earth science, or physics)
  • Adolescence Social Studies

Please note that SUNY Brockport does not currently offer a graduate program leading to initial Childhood Education Grades 1-6 certification.

APPLICATION GUIDELINES
Application packets may be obtained from the Office of Graduate Admissions in Morgan Hall. Applicants should be certain to indicate the program for which they are applying.

As part of the self-managed application process, applicants must submit:

  • official transcripts of all graduate and undergraduate work completed;
  • three professional (not personal) recommendations from those who know of the applicant's aptitude for teaching, ability to relate to children, and ability to successfully do graduate level work;
  • a 40-hour field experience supervisor recommendation form (for 54-credit program applicants only);
  • an essay on the applicant's reasons and fitness for teaching and for pursuing graduate education; and
  • a copy of the applicant's NYS teaching certificate or a letter from the applicant's college certification officer or BOCES Regional Certification Officer attesting to his/her eligibility for the certificate (30-36 credit program applicants only).

In addition to the materials submitted as part of the self-managed application, all programs in the Department of Education and Human Development may require an interview. However, for the Childhood Literacy and Childhood Special Education Programs, the interview process is a mandatory part of the application. If selected for an interview, applicants will be contacted within a few weeks after the application deadline to schedule the interview. Applicants selected for an interview who do not participate in the interview process, will not be considered for program admission.

The deadlines for submission of the application, with all required information, are September 15 (for spring matriculation) and February 15 (for summer/fall matriculation). Please note that the Childhood Literacy and Childhood Special Education Programs have only one deadline per calendar year - February 15.

Normally, within 3-4 weeks of the deadlines stated above, the faculty reviews the applications and makes admission recommendations. By the end of the month following the application deadline, applicants are notified by letter whether or not they have been recommended for admission.

Applicants who are recommended for admission must then attend an orientation session and meet with a designated advisor to complete a Plan of Study (POS). Only after the Plan of Study has been accepted will the admission recommendation be forwarded to the Office of Graduate Admissions. Only a letter from the Office of Graduate Admissions constitutes an official offer of admission. Applicants are not officially admitted until they return the Reply Form that accompanies the offer of admission. Once applicants accept the offer of admission and the Reply Form is received, they may register as matriculated students.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Admission to degree programs in Education and Human Development is highly competitive. There is not space to accommodate all qualified applicants in most programs; therefore, all qualified persons may not be accepted.

All applicants must have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution (see pg. 23 for further details). Normally, an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher is required. Applicants with a GPA below 3.0 must thoroughly address that issue upon application.

30-36 Credit Programs
With four exceptions, students applying for a 30-, 33- or 36-credit program must hold provisional or initial certification in the area for which the application is being made. The exceptions are:

  • The Bilingual Program will consider applicants with certification in subject areas other than foreign languages, who wish to obtain the Bilingual Extension Certificate. (See list of appropriate certifications under the section entitled "Bilingual Program")
  • The Childhood Special Education Program requires provisional certification in PreK-6 or initial certification in Childhood Education Grades 1-6.
  • The Childhood Literacy Program requires provisional certification in PreK-6 or initial certification in either Early Childhood Education Birth-Grade 2 or Childhood Education Grades 1-6.
  • The Childhood Education Curriculum Specialist Program will consider applicants holding the initial Early Childhood Birth-Grade 2 certificate for the purpose of attaining the NYS Professional Early Childhood Birth-Grade 2 certificate by direct state application.

54-Credit Programs
Students applying for a 54-credit Alternate Adolescence Education Program should be aware that previous successful experience with children is considered in the admission decision. For each program, a major or 30 credits in the content area is also required for program acceptance.

Acceptable majors for state certification and SUNY Brockport programs include:

  • English,
  • Mathematics,
  • sciences (biology, chemistry, earth science and physics), and
  • social studies (history, or see section below).
Below are listed the academic requirements for non-majors to qualify for each of the Alternate Adolescence Education Programs offered by the Department of Education and Human Development.

English
Courses offered by an English department as core requirements for a degree are acceptable. For example, courses in composition, English literature, poetry, playwriting, grammar and English linguistics are acceptable. A maximum of six credits for study in related areas such as speech, drama, theater, and journalism may be allowed toward the 30-credit requirement for study in English.

Mathematics*
Courses offered by a mathematics department that are considered core requirements toward a degree in mathematics are typically acceptable. For example, courses in mathematical reasoning, quantitative methods, number theory and concepts, algebra, analytic geometry, calculus, geometry, trigonometry, data analysis, probability, statistics and discrete mathematics are acceptable. Statistics courses that are offered by another department are also acceptable. Only those computer courses that involve using computers to solve mathematical problems are acceptable. Courses in computer science, accounting, finance and courses in which mathematics is applied to solving problems other than those that are purely mathematical are not acceptable.

Science*

Biology - Courses in scientific methods, cell biology, biochemistry, anatomy and physiology, comparative anatomy, genetics and evolution, biological diversity, human biology and human ecology are acceptable. Courses in nutrition are acceptable only if they are in cell nutrition.

Chemistry - Courses in scientific methods, matter and atomic structure, energy, chemical bonds and molecular structure, chemical reactions and quantitative relations are acceptable. Courses in geochemistry are generally applied science courses and, therefore, not acceptable.

Earth science - Courses in scientific methods, space systems, atmospheric systems, geological systems and water systems are acceptable. Courses in engineering and geophysics are generally applied science courses and, therefore, not acceptable.

Physics - Courses in scientific methods, mechanics and heat, electricity and magnetism, waves, sound and light, and quantum theory and the atom are acceptable. Courses in engineering and geophysics are generally applied science courses and, therefore, not acceptable. Astronomy courses are acceptable only if the primary focus is on the mathematics of gravitational attraction between astral bodies.

SUNY College at Brockport, following state regulations, requires a total of 18 credits in at least two additional science areas to recommend students for the General Science Extension certificate.

Social Studies
Courses in US and world history and geography, economics, government, political science, anthropology and sociology are acceptable. SUNY Brockport, following state regulations, requires a minimum of 21 credits in history and 3 credits in government, economics and geography for program acceptance.

* Individuals applying to the 54-credit Alternate Adolescence Education Programs in Mathematics or Science, who possess an engineering or similarly technical degree, must provide a State Education Department (SED) or Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) written evaluation of the academic content area as part of the application process.

Please note that applicants with foreign credentials must obtain a review of credentials/transcripts from the New York State Education Department prior to application. This is necessary to determine if minimum content area requirements have been met.

DEGREE AND RELATED POLICIES
All courses taken must be part of the approved Plan of Study. At least 15 credits must be taken at the 600 or higher course level. A grade of "B-" or better is required in all program courses used to meet initial state certification requirements. A minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA is required for graduation.

All students in a degree program offered by the Department of Education and Human Development must successfully complete a culminating experience-an approved thesis, project, analytical review of the literature or seminar portfolio. The culminating experience is planned in consultation with a faculty member(s) and is included as one of the final courses leading to the MSEd degree.

Previous Course Credit
Credit for courses taken before matriculation may be approved if a grade of "B" or better has been earned and if the courses are appropriate for the course of study pursued. Such retroactive credit will not exceed 12 credits, with no more than nine allowed from course work completed at SUNY Brockport in non-degree status prior to matriculation. Normally, courses older than five years will not be considered. A maximum of only six credits will be accepted from any other graduate level program leading to provisional or initial certification.

Please note that courses taken prior to matriculation will not automatically be accepted as part of the graduate program regardless of where or when the courses were taken. Thus, it is in the applicant's best interest to seek admission prior to taking courses.

Requirements for Retention in Program
Students must make satisfactory progress toward meeting degree requirements in order to maintain their matriculated status. The following requirements must be satisfied:

  • Students must follow the approved Plan of Study. The planned program must reflect a schedule that allows completion of all degree requirements within five years from the date of matriculation.
  • Since a minimum 3.0 GPA is required for graduation, students are expected to maintain a 3.0 GPA during all semesters. Grade point averages will be monitored after the completion of nine or more graduate credits. Matriculated graduate students whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 will be placed on academic probation. Students will receive written notification of their probationary status from the Office of Graduate Studies.
  • Continuous progress in a program means that a minimum of one course must be taken each calendar year. College policy provides that students who do not maintain such continuous enrollment will be dematriculated.

Graduate Assistants
A matriculated student seeking an appointment as a graduate assistant may obtain an assistantship application and information from the graduate secretary of the Department of Education and Human Development, (585) 395-5060.

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAMS (33-36 credits)

MS in Education: Childhood Education Curriculum Specialist
The Childhood Education Curriculum Specialist Program meets the degree requirements for NYS Professional Childhood Education Grades 1-6, Early Childhood Birth-Grade 2*, or NYS Permanent PreK-6 certification.

I. Prerequisites
  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited four-year college or university (see pg. 23 for further information) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  2. Valid NYS initial Childhood Education Grades 1-6, initial Early Childhood Birth-Grade 2*, or provisional PreK-6 certification.
II. Required Courses
Credits
  1. Core Courses
9
  EDI 600Understanding Educational Research
3
  EDI 602 Seminar in Childhood Curriculum
3
  EDI 703 Seminar in Childhood Education
3
   
  2. Curriculum Concentration
12-15
  At least one course in each of the following areas:(selected with advisement)
  a) science or teaching of science
3
  b) mathematics or teaching of mathematics
3
  c) language arts or teaching of language arts
3
  d) social science or teaching of social studies
3
   
  3. Breadth Courses (selected with advisement)
6-9
   
  4. Elective
3
Minimum Total:
33

NOTE: Two courses in the program must carry liberal arts (A) designation.
* Please note that completion of this program does not lead to an extension or additional certification in Childhood Education Grades 1-6 for those holding the initial Early Childhood Birth-Grade 2 Certification upon program entrance.
** Students holding certification in Early Childhood are strongly encouraged to complete pedagogy course work.

MS in Education: Childhood Literacy
The Childhood Literacy Program requires approximately a 14-month commitment to full-time study. Students are admitted during the spring application period, begin the program in the summer, engage in full-time study the following fall and spring semesters, and complete the last two courses during the second summer. The degree leads to New York State (NYS) certification as a Literacy Birth-Grade 6 teacher. It will also meet the state's permanent/professional certification education requirement for teachers with provisional/initial certification.

I. Prerequisites
  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited four-year college or university (see pg. 23 for further details) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. (Please note: Applicants must complete all requirements for the baccalaureate degree by the May commencement at their college or university to be eligible for summer matriculation at SUNY Brockport. Applicants who are accepted and fail to graduate from the undergraduate program in May are not eligible to begin the program. Such applicants may request to begin the program the following summer. Applicants expecting to complete their baccalaureate degree in the summer or fall semesters should apply for matriculation in the following summer.)
  2. Valid NYS provisional PreK-6 certification or initial certification in Childhood Education Grades 1-6 or Early Childhood Education Birth-Grade 2. This should include six credits in literacy (reading) education. (Please note: Applicants must complete all requirements for the NYS teaching certificate prior to matriculation and provide proof of certification or eligibility for certificate.)
II. Required Courses
Credits
  1. First Summer
  * Elective
3
  EDI 730 Literacy Assessment
3
  2. Fall Semester
  EDI 731 Advanced Developmental Literacy Instruction
3
  EDI 734 Literary Seminar I
3
  EDI 739 Language Arts in Literacy Instruction
3
  EDI 735 Emergent Language and Literacy
3
  3. Spring Semester
  EDI 736 Literary Seminar II
3
  EDI 738 Reading and Writing in the Content Areas
3
  EDI 634 Teaching Reading to the Child with Special Needs
3
  EDI 732 Clinical Diagnosis
3
  4. Second Summer
  EDI 733 Literacy Practicum
3
  * Elective
   
  Minimum Total:
36
   
  * One elective must be taken in education.
   

MS in Education: Childhood Special Education
The Childhood Special Education Program requires a yearlong commitment to full-time study. Students are admitted during the spring application period, begin the program in the summer, and engage in full-time study the following fall and spring semesters. The degree leads to New York State (NYS) Students with Disabilities Grades 1-6 initial certification. It also meets the state's permanent/professional certification education requirement for teachers with provisional/initial certification.

I. Prerequisites
  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited four-year college or university (see pg 23 for further details) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. (Please note: Applicants must complete all requirements for the baccalaureate degree by the May commencement at their college or university to be eligible for summer matriculation at SUNY Brockport. Applicants who are accepted and fail to graduate from their undergraduate program in May are not eligible to begin the program. Such applicants may request to begin the program the following summer. Applicants expecting to complete their baccalaureate degree in the summer or fall semesters should apply for matriculation in the following summer.)
  2. Valid NYS provisional PreK-6 certification or initial certification in Childhood Education Grades 1-6. (Please note: Applicants must complete all requirements for the NYS teaching certificate prior to matriculation and provide proof of certification or eligibility for certificate.)
II. Required Courses
Credits
  1. *Summer
  EDI 615 Creating Learning Environments
3
  EDI 652 Learning Strategies for Exceptional Learners
3
  EDI 653 Teaching Diverse Populations: Part I
3
  2. Fall Semester
  EDI 613 Inclusion and Collaboration
3
  EDI 614 Assessment, Evaluation, and Intervention
3
  EDI 658 Teaching Diverse Populations: Part II
3
  EDI 693 Internship I in Exceptional Education
3
  3. Spring Semester
  EDI 608 Foundations of Special Education
3
  EDI 694 Internship II in Exceptional Education
3
  EDI 705 Principles of Educatoinal Research
3
  Elective
3
   
  Minimum Total:
33
   
  *Requires participation in Camp Abilities
   

 

BILINGUAL EDUCATION PROGRAM (30-credit program)

MS in Education: Bilingual (Spanish)
The Bilingual Program meets the academic requirements for the extension certificate in bilingual education except for those certified in a foreign language. This master's degree program will meet the professional or permanent certification education requirement for those eligible for program participation.

I. Prerequisites
  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited four-year college or university (see pg. 23 for further details) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  2. Valid NYS certification in one of the following areas:
    • initial Early Childhood Birth-Grade 2
    • initial Childhood Education Grades 1-6
    • initial adolescence, any content area 7-12 (other than foreign language)
    • provisional PreK-6, or
    • provisional secondary, any content area 7-12 (other than foreign language)
  3. Demonstrated proficiency in Spanish at the advanced level. An oral proficiency in- terview may be required of some applicants. If required, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, (585) 395-2269, will contact the applicant to schedule the interview.
II. Program Courses
Credits
  1. Liberal Arts
18
  FCE 520 Multiculturalism in the U.S.
3
  FCE 526 Foundations of Bilingual Education
3
  SPN 560 Spanish Phonology
3
 

or

 

SPN 561 Advanced Spanish Grammar

 

SPN 563 Linguistics and SLA

3
 

or

  ENL 551 Linguistics
  or
  ENL 555 Sociolinguistics
   
  2. Professional Education
15
  EDI 603 Educational Measurement and Evaluation
3
  or
  EDI 685 Statistics and Research Design
3
  EDI 628 TESOL: Materials and Techniques
3
  EDI 521 Teaching the Bilingual Child
3
  EDI 612 Bilingual Methods of Teaching Content
3
  EDI 722 Seminar Bilingual Ed (Project/Thesis)
3
   
  3. Elective (by advisement)
3
Minimum Total:
30

ADOLESCENCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS (33 credits)

MS in Education: Adolescence English
This program meets the professional or permanent certification education requirement for adolescence or secondary English education. The Plan of Study must include at least four courses in each of two areas: liberal arts (English) and professional education (English education). To meet the requirements for professional or permanent certification, students are required to take courses in the following areas: teaching the English language, teaching literature, teaching writing and teaching reading. The seminar contains the culminating activity.

I. Prerequisites
  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited four-year college or university (see pg. 23 for further details) with a minimum 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale.
  2. Valid NYS initial or provisional certification in English 7-12.
II. Program Courses Credits
  1. Liberal Arts, for example: 12-18
  ENL 525 Contemporary British Writers 3
 

ENL 543 Contemporary American Poetry

3
  ENL 581 English Grammar
3
  ENL 584 Young Adult Literature 3
  2. Professional Education 12-18
  EDI 603 Educational Measurement and Evaluation
3
  EDI 645 Reading and Responding to Lit, K-12
3
  EDI 648 Teaching of Written Composition K-12
3
  EDI 678 Issues in English Education
3
  EDI 791 Seminar in English Education 3
  3. Elective 3
     
  Minimum Total: 33

MS in Education: Adolescence Mathematics
This program meets the professional or permanent certification education requirement for adolescence or secondary mathematics education. The Plan of Study must include courses in each of two areas: liberal arts (mathematics) and professional education (mathematics education). The seminar contains the culminating activity.

I. Prerequisites

  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited four-year college or university (see pg. 23 for further details) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

  2. Valid NYS initial or provisional certification in Mathematics 7-12.
II. Program Courses
Credits
  1. Liberal Arts, for example:
12-18
  MTH 512 History of Mathematics
3
  MTH 551 Applied Calculus
3
  MTH 555 Differential Equations
3
  MTH 557 Real Analysis
3
  2. Professional Education
12-18
  EDI 622 Advanced Adol. Curr: Mathematics
3
  EDI 686 Problems in Mathematics Education
3
  EDI 792 Seminar in Mathematics Education
3
  An additional 3-9 credits selected by advisement, based on the student's individual programmatic needs.
3-9
  3. Elective
3
   
  Minimum Total:
33

 

MS in Education: Adolescence Science
This program meets the professional or permanent certification degree requirements for 7-12 biology, chemistry, earth science or physics. The Plan of Study must include courses in each of two areas: professional education and liberal arts, specifically the science area(s) in which candidate holds initial or provisional certification(s). The seminar contains the culminating activity.

I. Prerequisites
  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited four-year college or university (see pg. 23 for further details) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  2. Valid NYS initial or provisional certification in Biology 7-12, Chemistry 7-12, Earth Science 7-12, or Physics 7-12.
II. Program Courses
Credits
  1. Liberal Arts
12-18
  Selection of appropriate science courses by advisement
  2. Professional Education
12-18
  EDI 617 Adv. Methods Teaching Science
3
  EDI 623 Reading Research in Science Education
3
 

EDI 685 Statistics and Research Design

3
  EDI 793 Seminar in Science Education
3
  An additional 3-9 credits selected by advisement, based on the student's individual programmatic needs.
3-9
  3. Elective
3
   
  Minimum Total:
33

 

MS in Education: Adolescence Social Studies
This program meets the professional or permanent certification education requirement for adolescence or secondary social studies education. The Plan of Study must include courses in each of two areas: liberal arts (social sciences) and professional education. The seminar contains the culminating activity.

I. Prerequisites

  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited four-year college or university (see pg. 23 for further details) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  2. Valid NYS initial or provisional certification in Social Studies 7-12.
II. Program Courses Credits
  1. Liberal Arts 12-18
  Selection of appropriate social science courses by advisement.  
  2. Professional Education EDI 624 Advanced Adol. Curriculum: Social Studies 3
  EDI 670 Issues in Social Studies Education 3
  EDI 674 Applied History Seminar 3
  EDI 794 Seminar in Social Studies Education 3
  An additional 3-9 credits selected by advisement, 3-9 based on the student's individual programmatic needs.

 
  3. Elective 3
     
  Minimum Total: 33

 

ALTERNATE MS IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS: ADOLESCENCE EDUCATION
(54 credits)

Purpose and Academic Eligibility
These programs were developed for persons with a baccalaureate degree who do not hold initial certification and wish to obtain NYS initial and professional certifications in an adolescence (grades 7-12) and middle childhood (grades 5-6) education area.

To be considered for admission, applicants must possess the necessary academic credentials. An academic major or the equivalent (30 credits in the certification content area) is required for entry into the program. See the section on Admissions Requirements for a list of acceptable majors for the various certification areas, special content requirements for the science and social studies programs, and all other admissions requirements.

Additional Certification Requirements
Below are listed NYS initial certification requirements not included in the alternate master's program:

  • one college level course in a language other than English (American Sign Language is acceptable) with a minimum grade of "C" or the equivalent (determined by a placement examination);
  • successful completion of the state's teacher certification examinations (including the LAST, ATS-W and appropriate Content Specialty Test);
  • state mandated fingerprinting; and
  • HLS 301, Principles of Healthful Living (or the equivalent). This course includes content that satisfies state requirements, including violence prevention and child abuse reporting.

Alternate MS Degree and Professional Certification
As mentioned earlier, completion of the MS in Education satisfies the academic requirement for a NYS professional certificate, the final certificate in the certification process. Students still may have teaching and testing requirements to fulfill. Currently students also receive a notation on their transcript upon MS program completion that allows them to participate in the reciprocity agreement between NYS and other states that have signed the agreement. This occurs only upon completion of the MS in Education program.

Prerequisites for Alternate Adolescence Programs

  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited four-year college or university (see pg. 23 for further details) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  2. An academic major in the program discipline or equivalent (30 credits in the discipline) as previously described.
  3. Verifiable experience with students in schools or other approved situations in an educational capacity. Forty (40) clock hours of such interaction are normally required prior to taking Phase II of the program. Such experiences may include volunteer or paid tutoring, work as an aide or substitute teacher, recreational or coaching or scouting responsibilities, etc. A mixture of middle level and secondary level experiences are preferred.

Alternate Adolescence English Education (Grades 7-12) with Middle Childhood Extension (Grades 5-6)

Please refer to the section on Admission Requirements and all introductory program information at the beginning of this section.

  Required Courses
Credits
1. Initial Sequence
42
*Liberal Arts Courses (by advisement)
6
Phase I
  PSH 584 Adolescence
3
  Phase II
  EDI 531 Language Skills in Content Area I
3
  EDI 545 Frameworks for Teaching English
3
  ** EDI 528 Middle Childhood Curriculum
3
  Phase III
  EDI 530 Education and Society
3
  ** EDI 565 Teaching English Inclusively
3
  EDI 509 Adolescence Students with Special Needs
3
  EDI 532 Language Skills in Middle and High School Content Area II
3
  Phase IV
  EDI 575 Practicum (Student Teaching with Seminar)
9
  EDI 576 Creating Positive Learning Environments
3
   
2. Post-Initial Sequence
12
  * Liberal Arts courses, by advisement
6
  *** EDI 678 Issues in English Education
3
  ***EDI 791 Seminar in English Education
3
   
    Minimum Total:
54

* Nine liberal arts credits must be taken at the 600 or higher level
** Courses incorporating major experiential requirements
*** Must be taken after practicum

Alternate Adolescence Mathematics Education (Grades 7-12) with Middle Childhood Extension (Grades 5-6)
Please refer to the section on Admission Requirements and all introductory program information at the beginning of this section.

Required Courses
Credits
1. Initial Sequence
42
  * Liberal Arts courses, by advisement
6
  Phase I
  PSH 584 Adolescence
3
  Phase II
  ** EDI 528 Middle School Curriculum
3
  EDI 546 Frameworks for teaching Mathematics
3
  EDI 531 Language Skills in Content Area I
3
  Phase III
  EDI 530 Education and Society
3
  ** EDI 566 Teaching Mathematics Inclusively
3
  EDI 509 Adolescence Students with Special Needs
3
  EDI 532 Language Skills in Content Area II
3
  Phase IV
  EDI 575 Practicum (Student Teaching with Seminar)
9
  EDI 578 Creating Positive Learning Environments
3
   
2. Post-Initial Sequence
12
  * Liberal Arts Courses, by advisement
6
  *** EDI 700 Reading Educational Research
3
  EDI 792 Seminar in School Mathematics Education
3
    Minimum Total:
54


* Nine liberal arts credits must be taken at the 600 or higher level
** Courses incorporating major experiential requirements
*** Must be taken after practicum

Alternate Adolescence Science Education (Grades 7-12) with Middle Childhood Extension (Grades 5-6); Science Certification in Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, or Physics - with option for General Science Extension

Please refer to the section on Admission Requirements and all introductory program information at the beginning of this section.

  Required Courses
Credits
1. Initial Sequence
42
  * Liberal Arts courses, by advisement
6
  Phase I
  PSH 584 Adolescence
3
  Phase II
  ** EDI 528 Middle School Curriculum
3
  EDI 547 Frameworks for Teaching Science
3
  EDI 531 Language Skills in Content Area I
3
  Phase III
  EDI 530 Education and Society
3
  ** EDI 567 Teaching Science Inclusively
3
  EDI 509 Teaching Students with Special Needs
3
  EDI 532 Language Skills in Content Area II
3
  Phase IV
  EDI 575 Practicum (Student Teaching with Seminar)
9
  EDI 576 Creating Positive Learning Environments
3
   
2. Post-Initial Sequence
12
  * Liberal Arts courses, by advisement
6
  *** EDI 623 Reading Research in Science Education
3
  *** EDI 793 Seminar in Science Education
3
   
    Minimum Total:
54

* Nine liberal arts credits must be taken at the 600 or higher level
** Courses incorporating major experiential requirements
*** Must be taken after practicum

Alternate Adolescence Social Studies Education (Grades 7-12) with Middle Childhood Extension (Grades 5-6)

Please refer to the section on Admission Requirements and all introductory program information at the beginning of this section.

  Required Courses
Credits
1. Initial Sequence
42
  * Liberal Arts courses, by advisement
6
  Phase I
  PSH 584 Adolescence
3
  Phase II
  EDI 548 Frameworks for Teaching Social Studies
3
  ** EDI 528 Middle Childhood Curriculum
3
  EDI 531 Language Skills in Content Area I
3
  Phase III
  EDI 530 Education and Society
3
  ** EDI 568 Teaching Social Studies Inclusively
3
  EDI 509 Adolescence Students with Special
3
  EDI 532 Language Skills in Content Area II
3
  Phase IV
  EDI 575 Practicum (Student Teaching with Seminar)
9
  EDI 578 Creating Positive Learning Environments
3
   
2. Post-Initial Sequence
12
  Liberal Arts Courses, by advisement
6
  *** EDI 624 Advanced Adolescence Curriculum: Social Studies
3
  *** EDI 670 Issues in Social Studies Education
3
  *** EDI 674 Applied History Seminar
3
  *** EDI 794 Seminar in Social Studies Education
3
   
  Total:
54

* Nine liberal arts credits must be taken at the 600 or higher level
** Courses incorporating major experiential requirement
*** Must be taken after practicum

Program Notes Applicable to the Alternate MS in Education Programs

  • Students must be matriculated in an appropriate program prior to registering for program courses.
  • The Initial Sequence must be completed in the order given.
  • Please note that Phase I and Phase II courses and experiential requirements may be combined with advisor approval.
  • Students must take six credits of liberal arts courses prior to Phase IV.
  • All requirements of Phases I-III must be completed prior to the practicum semester.
  • A total of 110 clock hours of documented experience with middle childhood and adolescent students is required in these programs. Phase I requires 40 hours, Phase II requires 30 hours, and Phase III requires 40-hours. Please note that the College will secure experiences for Phase II and III requirements. Students are responsible for securing their own Phase I experiences.

EDUCATION AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT COURSES

EDI 509 Adolescence Students with Special Needs (B). Examines the social, educational and personal implications of human exceptionality. Explores issues and concerns related to the identification and evaluation of exceptional individuals as well as ways to modify curriculum and instruction to meet the needs of a range of students, including inclusive and gifted and talented. Emphasizes the historical, legal and instructional issues related to educating students who learn differently. 3 Cr.

EDI 521 Methods for Teaching the Bilingual Child (B). Explores social, emotional and cognitive implications of the child who must function as a bilingual student in a classroom. Requires students to complete special bilingual modules specific to students' areas of teacher certification. Presents materials, teaching and assessment techniques used in the development of a coordinated bilingual lesson plan. Provides a study of general curriculum theory and application in a bilingual program. 3 Cr.

EDI 527 Cooperative Learning (B). Explores learning as a classroom structure that enables learners to work together to accomplish a task. Addresses how teachers can frame cooperative lessons that maximize student learning. Allows a participant to learn the attributes of cooperative learning, study documentation on cooperative learning, and plan for a classroom environment that reflects cooperation. Highly interactive and participatory in nature. 3 Cr.

EDI 528 Middle School Curriculum and Instruction (B). For alternate program students only. Introduces teachers and teacher candidates to middle school philosophy and organization, including the rationale for and function of: interdisciplinary teams, teachers-based guidance programs, flexible grouping and program scheduling. Focuses on the developmental characteristics for effective instructional strategies. Provides opportunities for the development of interdisciplinary curriculum and examines current practices and controversial issues in middle grade schools. Includes 30 clock hours of field experience in a middle-level school, grades 5-9. 3 Cr.

EDI 530 Education and Society (B). For alternate program students only. Introduces students to the historical, sociological and philosophic foundations of education including the role of education in America and in the teaching profession. 3 Cr.

EDI 531 Language Skills in Middle and High School Content Areas I (B). For alternate program students only. Focuses on the premise that reading and listening for meaning are critical to thinking about and learning content knowledge in all disciplines of study in the middle and high schools. Stresses the development of these language skills in early and later adolescence and the examination, the individual differences among learners, and multiple approaches and strategies that may be used to improve student thinking and learning. 3 Cr.

EDI 532 Language Skills in Middle and High School Content Areas II (B). For alternate program students only. Builds on students' study in EDI 531. Explores the idea that writing and speaking are fundamental to thinking about and learning content knowledge in all disciplines of study. Requires students to achieve an understanding of not only their own speaking and writing processes, but also of the kinds of experiences that help students write and speak with an authentic voice, develop a high degree of fluency, and produce writing and verbal presentations of consequences. 3 Cr.

EDI 539 Reading in Content Areas (B). Examines ways to help students get the most from their textbooks. Considers alternatives to textbooks in teaching content-area classes. 3 Cr.

EDI 545 Frameworks for Teaching English (B). Prerequisites or corequisites: EDI 530 and PSH 584. Introduces students to the methods and strategies involved in the teaching of a middle and high school subject, including English. Begins the exploration of the nature of teaching, instructional planning, designing unit and lesson plans, interdisciplinary approaches, assessment and teaching portfolios. Requires students to practice teaching lessons they've designed and to be reflective about their own and others' lessons. Focuses on the students' ability to work collaboratively as members of teams. Provides opportunities for students to clarify their goals in pursuit of a teaching career, and requires the construction of a personal statement of educational philosophy. 3 Cr.

EDI 546 Frameworks for Teaching Mathematics (B). Prerequisites or corequisites: EDI 530 and PSH 584. Introduces students to the methods and strategies involved in the teaching of a middle and high school subject, including mathematics. Begins the exploration of the nature of teaching, instructional planning, designing unit and lesson plans, interdisciplinary approaches, assessment and teaching portfolios. Requires students to practice teaching lessons they've designed and to be reflective about their own and others' lessons. Focuses on the students' ability to work collabor-atively as members of teams. Provides oppor-tunities are provided for students to clarify their goals in pursuit of a teaching career. Requires constructing a personal statement of educational philosophy. 3 Cr.

EDI 547 Frameworks for Teaching Science (B). Prerequisites or corequisites: EDI 530 and PSH 584. Introduces students to the methods and strategies involved in the teaching of a middle and high school subject, including science. Begins the exploration of the nature of teaching, instructional planning, designing unit and lesson plans, interdisciplinary approaches, assessment and teaching portfolios. Requires students to practice teaching lessons they've designed and to be reflective about their own and others' lessons. Focuses on the students' ability to work collaboratively as members of teams. Provides opportunities for students to clarify their goals in pursuit of a teaching career. Requires constructing a personal statement of educational philosophy. 3 Cr.

EDI 548 Frameworks for Teaching Social Studies (B). Prerequisites or corequisites: EDI 530 and PSH 584. Introduces students to the methods and strategies involved in the teaching of a middle and high school subject, including social studies. Begins the exploration of the nature of teaching, instructional planning, designing unit and lesson plans, interdisciplinary approaches, assessment and teaching portfolios. Requires students to practice teaching lessons they've designed and to be reflective about their own and others' lessons. Focuses on the student's ability to work collabora-tively as members of teams. Provides opportunities for students to clarify their goals in pursuit of a teaching career, and requires construction of a personal statement of educational philosophy. 3 Cr.

EDI 551 Overseas Studies in British Education (B). Enables a small group of students to visit selected urban and suburban English schools and educational agencies over a two-week period. Provides background seminars at SUNY Brockport in the months preceding the trip. Conducted under direct supervision of a Brockport professor. Interested students should contact the Department of Education and Human Development for further information. 3 Cr.

EDI 553 Teaching Children's Literature (B). Covers both traditional and current literature for young children critically appraised in terms of behavioral objectives. Analyzes nursery rhymes, nursery tales, songs, finger play and the many current books for preschool and primary school children in terms of their contributions to social growth, language development, reading, math, science and social studies. 3 Cr.

EDI 565 Teaching Adolescence English Inclusively (B). Prerequisite: EDI 545. Focuses on inclusive teaching strategies in the content areas, including lesson planning, instruction and assessment. Emphasizes adolescence curriculum content and the New York State Education Learning Standards as well as technological applications that apply to teaching and learning. Requires the student to take an active role in becoming a reflective practitioner, working on personal portfolios and reading research articles. 3 Cr.

EDI 566 Teaching Adolescence Mathematics Inclusively (B). Prerequisite: EDI 546. Focuses on inclusive teaching strategies in the content areas, including lesson planning, instruction and assessment. Emphasizes adolescence curriculum content and the New York State Education Learning Standards as well as technological applications that apply to teaching and learning. Requires students to take an active role in becoming a reflective practitioner, working on personal portfolios and reading research articles. 3 Cr.

EDI 567 Teaching Adolescence Science Inclusively (B). Prerequisite: EDI 547. Focuses on inclusive teaching strategies in the content areas, including lesson planning, instruction and assessment. Emphasizes adolescence curriculum content and the New York State Education Learning Standards as well as technological applications that apply to teaching and learning. Requires students to take an active role in becoming a reflective practitioner, working on personal portfolios and reading research articles. 3 Cr.

EDI 568 Teaching Adolescence Social Studies Inclusively (B). Prerequisite: EDI 548. Focuses on inclusive teaching strategies in the content areas, including lesson planning, instruction and assessment. Emphasizes adolescence curriculum content and the New York State Education Learning Standards as well as technological applications that apply to teaching and learning. Requires students to take an active role in becoming a reflective practitioner, working on personal portfolios and reading research articles. 3 Cr.

EDI 571 Conflict Resolution (A). Covers conflict resolution as an attempt to fulfill personal and professional goals regarding constructive ways of managing and resolving conflict. Discusses personal, public and professional conflicts. Covers methods of conflict resolution, including exploration of pertinent communication and group dynamics and mediation skills along with the use of dilemmas, games and other activities. Discusses the teaching of the skills of conflict resolution to students at the elementary and secondary levels. Requires a final project and extensive class participation. 3 Cr.

EDI 572 Values Education (B). Examines the objectives and theory of moral and values education, explores productive approaches to values education that can be used in the classroom, and instructs students how to make plans for the incorporation of values education into the existing curricula for their grade and subject areas. 3 Cr.

EDI 575 Practicum in Adolescence Education (B). Prerequisites: Completion of Phase III courses and corequisites. For alternate program students only. Provides a student teaching assignment involving professional teaching responsibility in an appropriate secondary and/or middle school subject matter field for one semester. 9 Cr.

EDI 578 Creating Positive Learning Environments (B). Prerequisites: Completion of Phase III courses and corequisites. Specifically examines strategies to establish and maintain positive classroom learning environments and emphasizes reflection on best teaching practices, effective use of class time, understanding group dynamics and interpreting student actions in classroom situations. 3 Cr.

EDI 581 Technology in the Classroom (B). Designed for the computer novice. Introduces teachers (and prospective teachers) to a wide variety of uses for technology in education. Includes topics such as effective use of the Internet in education; integrating "tool" software (word processor, database, spreadsheet) into the classroom; creating standards-based, technology-rich lesson plans; classroom uses of digital cameras and scanners; constructing classroom multimedia presentations; developing school Web pages; graphics and desktop publishing; demonstrations of software and Web sites for classroom use; discussions of pertinent technology topics (such as viruses, copyright law, plagiarism), and the social and ethical implications of using educational technologies. 3 Cr.

EDI 585 Operation Physics (A). Increases the knowledge and conceptual understanding of fundamental physical principles directed toward teachers of grades 4-8. Provides many hands-on activities for use and adaptation by teachers. 3 Cr.

EDI 590 Topics of Instruction (B). Meets the needs of intact groups of clients. Transcript title, content, bibliography and assessment procedures vary in accordance with the predetermined needs and interests of the group of clients served. 1-6 Cr.

EDI 594 Integrating Geography Skills K-12 (B). Examines the five themes of geography-place, location, movement, regions, human environment interactions, as well as the development of map and globe skills with an emphasis on the integration of these topics within the social studies curriculum and within the other subject areas. 3 Cr.

EDI 600 Understanding Educational Research (B). Explores qualitative and quantitative methods of research. Examines action research that pertains to teaching and research interests. Involves action research related to a discipline. Requires students to formulate an action research question for possible use with the project/thesis and develop a literature review for the question, including an evaluation of the research. 3 Cr.

EDI 602 Seminar in Childhood Curriculum (B). Provides an understanding of the processes and programs of the childhood curriculum. Requires students to engage in reading and discussion of curriculum and current topics related to curriculum design and implementation. 3 Cr.

EDI 603 Educational Measurement and Evaluation (B). Provides a survey of practices in educational measurement and evaluation; test and non-test measurement; basic statistical procedures; diagnostic procedures; test interpretation; score conversion; data analysis; and decision making. 3 Cr.

EDI 604 Seminar in Adolescence Curriculum (B). Provides a study of adolescence curriculum problems, effective practices and governance issues. Covers patterns of curriculum organization to serve as basis for individual research papers. 3 Cr.

EDI 605 Inclusion (A). Examines the historical, legal and instructional issues related to educating students with disabilities in settings with their typical, non-disabled peers. Explores theoretical, professional and programmatic implications of practices such as mainstreaming, blended classes and especially inclusion. Emphasizes the interdependency among students, families and educators. Provides students with research, observation and presentation opportunities to increase understanding of the relationship between special and regular education. Students who have received academic credit for DBD 311 or DBD 601 may not receive credit for this course. 3 Cr.

EDI 606 Teaching Adolescence Students with Mild Disabilities (A). Allows students to develop an understanding of the factors which have led to special education services to adolescence students with mild disabilities; increase awareness of how students with mild disabilities affect learning and school performance; evaluate the strengths, weaknesses and efficacy of alternatives to traditional classroom teaching in content area; identify, examine and practice specific methods of assessing, reporting and managing classroom behaviors to provide useful evaluative data for decision making; and summarize the significant issues and special considerations in reading, written expression and math instruction for students with mild disabilities in inclusive adolescence classrooms. 3 Cr.

EDI 607 Brain-based Teaching (B). Allows students to understand how the brain learns; studies multiple intelligences theory; and allows for practice with the tools and procedure for designing effective learning environments for students of different grade levels. 3 Cr.

EDI 608 Foundations of Special Education (B). Prerequisite: EDI 615. Childhood Special Education students only. Helps educators and prospective teachers examine the historical, philosophical, sociological and cultural foundations of the field of special education. Provides a greater understanding of legislation, past and present, and socioeconomic considerations that impact the efficacy and equity of special education services and models. Provides an overview of special education assessment, diagnostic and evaluation tools and discusses the implications for practice based on assessment outcomes. 3 Cr.

EDI 609 Performance Assessment (B). Addresses the growing national concern for more effective assessment practices that involve students in authentic learning tasks, measure learning outcomes, and how they are linked with curriculum. Surveys and studies various methods of assessing student performance, including new assessment practices as indicators of student learning, such as portfolios. Analyzes the link between effective assessment and effective curriculum through implementation and reflective practices with classrooms. 3 Cr. Summer

EDI 610 Behavior-problem Children (A). Provides a comprehensive study of the etiology and treatment of children and adolescents whose deviant behaviors necessitate special treatment and/or management in schools or residential settings. Studies the role of various disciplines involved in the treatment plan. 3 Cr.

EDI 611 Teaching Childhood Science (B). Explores methods and techniques for teaching childhood school science through a hands-on approach. Emphasizes the goals of the New York State Science Syllabus: problem solving, skills of inquiry, science attitudes and science content. 3 Cr.

EDI 612 Bilingual Methods of Teaching Content (B). Provides practical experience in planning, developing materials and instructing in the childhood or adolescence content area of the student's certificate. Examines the relationship between language acquisition and learning content areas. A 50-hour field experience provides positive interaction with student and school personnel, as well as classroom management in a bilingual classroom setting. 3 Cr.

EDI 613 Inclusion and Collaboration for Educators of Exceptional Learners (B). Prerequisite: EDI 615. Childhood Special Education students only. Helps educators and prospective teachers examine effective strategies for integrating and supporting special needs students into classes and programs with non-disabled peers. 3 Cr.

EDI 614 Assessment, Evaluation and Intervention (B). Prerequisite: EDI 615. Childhood Special Education students only. Concentrates on formal and informal testing procedures for exceptional learners and on the prescription of the appropriate teaching methods based on the data. Examines standardized tests, administration of achievement tests, observational skills, anecdotal writing, report writing, learning strengths and weaknesses, multiple intelligences, learning styles, application to content and IEP writing. 3 Cr.

EDI 615 Creating a Learning Environment for Students with Exceptionalities (B). Childhood Special Education students only. Targets the safe learning environment for students with special needs. Emphasizes behavior management, learner centered constructivism, dimensions of learning, classroom organization, intervention strategies, community building and social skills. 3 Cr.

EDI 617 Advanced Methods in Teaching Adolescence Science (B). Explores the methods, materials and techniques for the teaching of adolescence science. Includes topics such as the psychological aspects of teaching and learning, systematic classroom management and effective instruction. 3 Cr.

EDI 622 Advanced Adolescence Curriculum: Mathematics (B). Provides a study of mathematics curriculum with emphasis on development, content and implementation of new programs. Provides students with a deeper understanding of the math they teach and barriers to learning. Expects students to formulate their own action research question for possible use with their project/thesis and develop a literature review for the question, including an evaluation of the research they are reading. 3 Cr.

EDI 623 Reading Research in Adolescence Science (B). Prerequisite: EDI 617. Examines current research and experimentation in adolescence science education. Analyzes methods, procedures, implications and applications for the teaching of science in the secondary school. 3 Cr.

EDI 624 Advanced Adolescence Curriculum: Social Studies (B). Emphasizes the development of middle childhood and adolescence curriculum, based on student-involving experiences and a multimedia approach. Requires students to design curriculum and materials for use in their classrooms after an examination of a number of curricula and teaching materials in the social studies area. 3 Cr.

EDI 626 Urban Education (A). Examines the critical issues relative to urban education. Topics include teacher-student expectations, culturally relevant curriculum, perceptions and voices of minority and low-income students, the racial achievement gap and urban pedagogy. 3 Cr.

EDI 627 Education Change and Organizational Theory (A). Introduces students to theoretical frameworks about complex organizations and the dynamics of educational change at the school level. Asks students to test applicability of these frameworks based on their own experience in schools. 3 Cr.

EDI 628 TESOL: Methods, Materials and Techniques (B). Trains teachers in a bilingual-multicultural program and others who wish to achieve pedagogical competency in the teaching of English as a second language. 3 Cr.

EDI 630 Problems in Teaching Reading (B). Takes a seminar approach to problems selected by individuals who wish to pursue specific aspects of reading instruction at an advanced level. Since the interests and needs of course clientele vary from semester to semester, does not identify specific areas of reading. 3 Cr.

EDI 631 Foundations of Whole Language (B). Examines the theoretical background and practical application of whole language instruction as a means to developing literacy at the elementary school level. Does not require prior experience in this area. 3 Cr.

EDI 633 Teaching Adolescence Reading (B). Examines the identification and appraisal of reading needs of secondary students. Provides a survey of methods, materials and organizational procedures for developmental and remedial reading instruction. Requires the analysis of reading skills and abilities in the content areas. 3 Cr.

EDI 634 Teaching Reading to Children with Special Needs (B). Prerequisites: Two reading courses equivalent to Literacy II, instructor's permission or EDI 730. Childhood Literacy students only in Spring. Open to others in Fall. Explores reading as an extension of the language process, focusing on children with special needs (e.g., the learning disabled, the gifted, the linguistically different, the emotionally disturbed, the mentally retarded, etc.). Emphasizes the learning environment. 3 Cr.

EDI 645 Reading and Responding to Literature, K-12 (B). Provides a survey of the major theories of literary interpretation and methods of applying them to various kinds of standard works of literature in school grades, K-12. 3 Cr.

EDI 648 Teaching of Written Composition, K-12 (B). A workshop for school teachers who wish to improve their own writing skills and their teaching of written composition. Requires students to produce varied pieces of writing, discuss their writing in class, read materials and texts dealing with teaching writing, and survey techniques for teaching writing and producing a term paper. 3 Cr.

EDI 651 Teaching the Gifted and Talented (B). Examines the problems and issues related to teaching gifted and talented students. Includes topics such as characteristics, identification, programs and methods. Explores special issues, such as handicapped gifted and minority gifted. 3 Cr.

EDI 652 Learning Strategies for Exceptional Learners (B). Prerequisite: EDI 615. Childhood Special Education students only. Acquaints the program interns with overall strategies of working with children with mild to moderate disabilities. Allows interns to demonstrate the ability to think and act like a special education teacher and begin to apply the various strategies to the classroom setting. Focuses on using authentic assessment and portfolios, planning for individual learning, implementing differentiated instruction, making modifications, teaching to the various multiple intelligences and learning styles, and teaching social skills. 3 Cr.

EDI 653 Teaching Diverse Populations: Part I (B). Prerequisite: EDI 615. Childhood Special Education students only. Provides advanced knowledge of and strategies for working with individuals who have learning disabilities (LD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD). Emphasizes causes, characteristics, developmental implications, teaching strategies, social implications and post school needs. 3 Cr.

EDI 657 Teaching Childhood Writing (B). For childhood school teachers who wish to improve their own writing skills and teaching of written composition in the elementary grades. Requires students to produce expressive, expository and persuasive writing; discuss their writing in class; summarize recent research in elementary school writing; review effective techniques for teaching children's writing; and create lessons for classroom use. 3 Cr.

EDI 658 Teaching Diverse Populations Part II (B). Prerequisite: EDI 615. Childhood Special Education students only. Helps educators and prospective teachers examine the instructional, curricular and social-emotional aspects of mental retardation (MR) and developmental disabilities (DD). Emphasizes etiologies, characteristics, developmental implications, teaching strategies, social implications, collaborative teaching and collaboration with families and community resources. Provides a greater understanding of MR/DD from early childhood perspective through adulthood (post-school). Examines assessment, diagnostic and evaluation tools and the educational and social-emotional implications for practice, based on ongoing formal and informal assessment outcomes. 3 Cr.

EDI 664 Learning Disabilities/Strategies (B). Designed for teachers and other human service professionals who seek to understand differences in learning ability. Gives special attention to special strategies for students with learning difficulties. Includes topics such as strategies for thinking, problem-solving, studying, memorizing and planning. 3 Cr.

EDI 665 Classroom Management (B). Provides participants with an understanding and application of some of the most recent theoretical models employed in the practice of classroom management. Emphasizes problem-solving techniques. Allows participants to explore the role of the teacher as the manager of the classroom environment, the students and the curriculum. Emphasizes the design of a comprehensive classroom management plan. 3 Cr.

EDI 670 Issues in Social Studies Education (A). Analyzes current scholarship in history, anthropology and other social science disciplines in order to analyze a variety of perspectives on historical topics. Gives special attention to the first phase of the research and writing that will become the basis for the master's thesis and is an important component of the class. Requires the completion of a review of the literature in the student's chosen area. 3 Cr.

EDI 671 Teaching Childhood Social Studies (B). Provides a comprehensive study of the curriculum and methods of guiding learning in childhood social studies. Examines current trends and issues in social studies instruction. Also provides opportunities for individual in-depth study of selected topics. 3 Cr.

EDI 674 Applied History Seminar (A). Involves students in an eclectic variety of readings and field experiences designed to maximize personal and collegial engagement with history. Uses field experiences, workshops with authorities in their fields, and classroom discussion. Designed to coordinate with Phase II of thesis research. Supports original, individual research in keeping with the types of experiences, readings and workshops conducted during the class. 3 Cr.

EDI 678 Issues in English Education (B). Examines contemporary instructional, curricular and assessment issues. Combines theory and practice in a manner designed to lead students toward formulating their culminating master's projects or theses. 3 Cr.

EDI 681 Teaching Childhood Mathematics (B). Explores past and present trends in teaching childhood mathematics. Considers problems concerning content, grade placement of topics and techniques of evaluating achievement in this subject matter field. Evaluates important research in the area of childhood mathematics. 3 Cr.

EDI 685 Statistics and Research Design (B). Prepares graduate students for interpreting and applying basic statistical tests including correlation, regression, chi-square and t-ratio. Studies these statistical procedures in the context of various research designs. 3 Cr.

EDI 686 Issues in Adolescence Mathematics Education (B). Masters candidates will discuss issues and trends in math, science, and technology education and its impact on classroom practice. They will apply research-based math education methods and curricular topics and implement an extensive action research project. 3 Cr.

EDI 689 Inquiry Teaching in Science, Math and Technology (A). Emphasizes the teaching of science, math and technology as involving the process skills of learning to gather information; to observe, study, and classify; to speculate, hypothesize, and generate theories; to test ideas and reject previously held assumptions in the face of new contradictory evidence; to design investigations and experiments; and to interpret data intelligently. Provides participants with the opportunity to clarify their own evolving definition of inquiry teaching and to explore activities that allow children to examine decisions requiring scientific judgments and make decisions about matters in science, math and technology with intelligence, sensitivity and growing wisdom. 6 Cr.

EDI 690 Topics of Instruction (A). Topic varies. May be repeated with instructor's permission. 1-3 Cr.

EDI 693 Special Education Internship I. Prerequisite: EDI 615. Childhood Special Education students only. Provides special education teaching experiences in childhood settings, including inclusive classrooms and self-contained classrooms, as well as pullout and push-in special education formats. 3 Cr.

EDI 694 Special Education Internship II (B). Prerequisite: EDI 615. Childhood Special Education students only. Continues experiences in childhood settings adding further internship responsibilities and experiences to existing ones. Involves experiences at both the early childhood (birth-grade 2) and childhood (grades 1-6) level as part of the internship. 3 Cr.

EDI 699 Independent Study in Education (B). Designed individually through consultation between student and instructor to suit the student's needs and interests and the special competence of the instructor. Additional requirements may be established by the department. 1-3 Cr.

EDI 703 Seminar in Childhood Education (B). Assists graduate students in childhood education in completing the required thesis or project as part of the MS in Education requirements. 3 Cr.

EDI 705 Principles of Educational Research (B). Prerequisite: EDI 615. Childhood Special Education students only. Guides students through the research process using a step-by-step approach, from defining a research question through the working of results. Explores both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Allows students to participate in collaborative and collegial assistance research methods. 3 Cr.

EDI 722 Seminar in Bilingual Education (B). Requires students to analyze the history and basic bibliography of bilingual education in the United States; to identify trends and practices in current bilingual programs; and to understand the principles of socio- and psycholinguistic analysis as applied to the target population. 3 Cr.

EDI 730 Literacy Assessment (B). Childhood Literacy students only. Informed by current research and standards in the field of literacy, engages teachers in close examination and implementation of a variety of assessment methods. Explores current issues involving different types of literacy assessments, including standardized testing, and the impact of socio-cultural background on assessment results. Provides opportunities to conduct a variety of classroom assessments and analyze those assessments to construct appropriate instructional plans. 3 Cr.

EDI 731 Advanced Developmental Reading Instruction (B). Prerequisite: EDI 730. Childhood Literacy students only. Assumes the prior successful completion of six credits in the teaching of reading at the undergraduate level. Revisits familiar areas, bringing the graduate student to a higher level of understanding while using a format that emphasizes workshops and hard copy products. Covers areas such as the psycholinguistic basis of literacy and instruction in the areas of word identification, word analysis, comprehension and responding to text. 3 Cr.

EDI 732 Clinical Diagnosis of Reading/Writing Difficulties (B). Prerequisite: EDI 730. Childhood Literacy students only. Seminars I and II are the anchor courses of the program. In addition to specific focuses such as research and professionalism, serves as a forum for integrating learning from other courses and field experiences. 3 Cr.

EDI 733 Literacy Practicum (B). Prerequisite: EDI 730. Childhood Literacy students only. A lab course utilizing clinical procedures in assessing the literacy of school-aged children. Requires that students create and carry out instructional plans for individuals and small groups to best serve the needs of the individual student. 3 Cr.

EDI 734 Literacy Seminar I. Prerequisite: EDI 730. Continuation of Seminar I, serving as a forum for integrating learning from other courses and from field experiences. Includes communication and program development. 3 Cr.

EDI 735 Emergent Language and Literacy (B). Prerequisite: EDI 730. Childhood Literacy students only. Examines the development of children's oral and written language from a socio-psycholinguistic perspective. Provides opportunities to explore the cognitive, social and cultural bases for language development and use, including dialect variation and second-language learning. 3 Cr.

EDI 736 Literacy Seminar II (B). Prerequisite: EDI 730. Childhood Literacy students only. Continuation of Seminar I, serving as a forum for integrating learning from other courses and from field experiences. Focuses on communication and program development. 3 Cr.

EDI 738 Reading and Writing in the Content Areas (B). Prerequisite: EDI 730. Childhood Literacy students only. A lab course utilizing clinical procedures in assessing the literacy of school-aged children. Requires that students create and carry out instructional plans for individuals and small groups to best serve the needs of the individual student. 3 Cr.

EDI 739 EDI 739 Language Arts in Literacy Instruction (B). Prerequisite: EDI 730. Childhood Literacy students only. Examines six different areas within the area of literacy: history of reading education, the writing process, spelling development, the affective domain, the conventions of written English, and technology. 3 Cr.

EDI 791 Seminar in English Education (B). Designed to be a culminating experience. Expects creative, innovative and extensive individual work at the highest level of proficiency. Offers three options for meeting the requirements of this course: a curriculum project, an analytic review of professional literature or a professional teaching portfolio. 3 Cr.

EDI 792 Seminar in Mathematics Education (B). Designed to be a culminating experience. Expects creative, innovative and extensive individual work at the highest level of proficiency. Offers three options for meeting the requirements of this course: a curriculum project, an analytic review of professional literature or a professional teaching portfolio. 3 Cr.

EDI 793 Seminar in Science Education (B). Designed to be a culminating experience. Expects creative, innovative and extensive individual work at the highest level of proficiency. Three options are available for meeting the requirements of this course: a curriculum project, an analytical review of professional literature or a professional teaching portfolio. 3 Cr.

EDI 794 Seminar in Social Studies Education (B). Designed to coordinate with the third and final phase of the master's thesis research. A culminating experience that will lead to the completion of the master's degree. 3 Cr.

The information in this publication was current as of June 2005 when the text was compiled. Changes, including but not restricted to, tuition and fees, course descriptions, degree and program requirements, policies, and financial aid availability may have occurred since that time. Whether or not a specific course is scheduled for a given term is contingent on enrollment, budget and staffing. The college reserves the right to make any changes it finds necessary and may announce such changes for student notification in publications other than the College catalogs. For the purpose of degree and program completion, students are bound by the requirements in effect as stated in the printed catalog at the time of their matriculation at SUNY Brockport. Inquiries on the current status of requirements can be addressed to the appropriate College department of office. Also refer to the Brockport Web site home page at www.brockport.edu for current information.