Skip Navigation

Department of Business Administration and Economics

119 Hartwell Hall
(585) 395-2623
www.brockport.edu/bus-econ/

Chairperson and Associate Professor: William Dresnack; Associate Chairperson: Jerald Weaver; Professors: John Gardner, Joseph Mason, Sandeep Singh, John Spitzer; Associate Professors: Steven Breslawski, Gary Briggs, Charles Callahan III, James Cordeiro, Richard Fenton, Baban Hasnat, D. Donald Kent, Susan Stites-Doe, Jeffrey Strieter, Ralph Trecartin, Melissa Waite, Jerald Weaver; Assistant Professors: Thomas Cone, M. Asri Jantan, John Keiser, Yusuf Nur, Gail Rein, Jane Romal, Rong Yang; Emeritus Faculty: Inaam Al-Hashimi, John Chasse, Rawle Farley, Yu-Ku Li, Edward Van Duzer.

Bar

Bar

Programs: The department’s programs are accredited by The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB). AACSB accreditation is a symbol of high program quality and indicates that the department’s programs have undergone extensive external review to ensure they meet the rigorous standards developed by more than 900 leading national and international business organizations and educational institutions. The department offers degree programs in accounting, international business, and business administration. Business administration students specialize in accounting, finance, management, marketing, or pre-law. The department also offers minors in business administration, economics, and finance.

Our Vision: To be recognized by our stakeholders for providing high-quality business education.

Our Mission: The department provides access to high-quality undergraduate business education for students who have demonstrated the prerequisite ability to succeed. The department’s programs accommodate a broad spectrum of students with varied interests, including transfer and non-traditional students. The department contributes to student success by preparing students for entry into professional business careers and graduate studies. Students learn theories of business and economics and develop important business skills. In order of emphasis, faculty engage in teaching, scholarship and service.

Program Goals: All of the department’s programs build on a comprehensive liberal arts education and provide a broad understanding of business-related theory and practice. All programs develop proficiency in written and oral communication, numeracy, and teamwork.

The Accounting Major prepares students to pursue careers in public accountancy as CPAs and as accountants in business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. Graduates may also assume positions that support an organization’s accounting and financial systems.

The Business Administration Major prepares students to assume entry-level positions in an organization’s accounting, financial, marketing, and management systems. Students are able to specialize in accounting, finance, marketing, management, and pre-law.

The International Business and Economics Major provides an interdisciplinary education that includes foreign language proficiency and cross-cultural awareness. Students gain knowledge and develop skills relevant to conducting business in the international domain. Graduates are prepared for careers with organizations with international operations.

Evening Programs: Complementing the day program is a sizeable offering of evening courses. All of the courses required to complete the business administration degree with a specialization in finance, management, or marketing, are offered in the evening on a rotating basis. Courses supporting the accounting degree are also offered on a rotating basis, but the department cannot guarantee optimal sequencing for evening students. The international business degree program cannot be completed at night.

The evening program is intended primarily for part-time students and for full-time students who want to take one or two courses per semester at night. Full-time students should not expect to be able to carry a full-time load at night. Evening courses are offered at the main SUNY Brockport campus. Students planning to complete a degree through evening courses should work closely with their advisor in planning degree completion.

Guidelines and Policies Pertaining to All Department Programs and Courses
All students majoring in the department’s programs are bound by the policies and procedures labeled 1 through 19 below.
  1. Changes in Degree Requirements Students must meet the degree requirements in effect at the time they matriculate (at the time they are formally accepted by SUNY Brockport for admission or readmission into a degree program). The department continuously revises its programs in response to changes in the business environment and the changing expectations of employers. Therefore the degree requirements listed in the Undergraduate Studies Catalog may not be current. Students and prospective students should check the department’s Web site for the most current program requirements, descriptions, and course offerings.
  2. Time Limitation: Courses completed more than 10 years prior to matriculation cannot be used to satisfy degree requirements in any of the department’s majors or minors. Courses completed more than 10 years prior to matriculation must be repeated. Under some circumstances, students may request the opportunity to earn course credit by examination rather than repeat a course; contact the department for details. This policy applies to courses taken at SUNY Brockport and courses taken at other institutions.
  3. Advisement: Students majoring in the department’s programs will be assigned a business faculty advisor when they declare their intent to major in business. The advisor’s name will then appear at the top of the student’s Degree Audit Report (DARS); DARS is available on the Web. After an advisor has been assigned, students are required to meet with their advisor each semester and are expected to:
    1. Bring a copy of their DARS report to the meeting.
    2. Prior to the meeting, consult their DARS report and the College’s Undergraduate Studies Catalog or department Web site for the purpose of determining which degree requirements the student has not yet met.
    3. Prior to the meeting, prepare a proposed schedule of classes for the following semester. Advisors assist students by reviewing the courses that the students select each semester and by answering questions about degree requirements, course sequencing, transfer course work, electives, careers, and graduate school. However, advisors will not create the students’ schedule for them.
    4. Prior to the meeting, consult with the online course schedule to confirm that the classes in the student’s proposed schedule are still open, making adjustments as necessary.

    It is the advisor’s prerogative to decline to meet with students who fail to meet these expectations , i.e., students who are unprepared. Unprepared students will be required to reschedule their meeting at a later date, which may result in courses filling before the student has the opportunity to register. This, in turn, may delay the student’s graduation.

    Faculty advisors assist students in academic planning, but each student is ultimately responsible for knowing and meeting their degree requirements as specified in the College catalog and on their Degree Audit Report (DARS).

  4. Registration: Each semester, the College will publish a schedule of the classes available the following semester. The schedule of classes also contains information on registration dates and times. A student’s registration date and time will vary by class rank and last name.

    Students must consult with their advisor and obtain an advisement Personal Identification Number (PIN) prior to registration for the following semester. Students should contact their advisor at least two weeks in advance of their registration date for the purpose of understanding how to schedule advisement. Advisors’ office hours will be posted on their office door or are available from the department secretary at (585) 395-2623 . Some advisors work by appointment while others work on a drop-in basis. Voice and e-mail messages left for advisors should include the student’s name, phone number, e-mail address, and times when the advisor may contact the student. Please speak slowly and clearly when leaving voice mail messages.

    Students who are unable to arrange advisement with their designated advisor, because of work or class schedule conflicts, should call (585) 395-2623 and request an appointment with the department’s general advisement staff. However, students are expected to work with their primary advisor if possible.

    Students who do not contact their faculty advisor on a timely basis or who register for courses after their designated registration date will often find themselves closed out of required courses, causing the students’ graduation date to be delayed.

  5. Closed Courses: The department sets enrollment caps on each course offered. Registration into closed business courses is controlled by the department and not by the instructor, i.e., an instructor cannot give permission to add into a closed course.

    Students seeking to add a closed course must complete a petition available in the department office. In general, the department gives priority to students who 1) need a course to graduate on time, 2) demonstrably cannot take an alternative, open course, and 3) made an attempt to register for the course during their designated registration period, i.e., the student did not register late. Students who fail to register during their designated registration period will not be added to closed sections or otherwise accommodated. As such, it is important that each student register at the designated time.

  6. Required Course Grades: An overall average of 2.0 is required to complete any major or minor offered by the department. In general, students majoring in the department’s programs need to earn a grade of at least “C-” in a course to count the course toward a degree requirement. However, accounting majors must earn at least a “C” in their accounting courses (ACC prefix on course number). Students pursuing a minor need only to pass a course (D- or above) to count the course toward the minor.
    Note: GPA requirement for acceptance as a business administration minor requires a minimum 3.0 GPA.
  7. Three Strikes Policy: To satisfy the minimum grade requirement described in 6 above, students may take a course up to three times. Students who are unable to earn the required grade after three attempts will be blocked from further registration in the course and, as such, will not be able to complete their program of study (the student will need to pursue a major or minor in another department).
    Note: This rule applies only to accounting, business, economics courses, ENL 308 and CIS 106.
  8. General Education Requirements: In addition to their major course work, students majoring in the department’s programs must complete all College General Education requirements; these are described in the College’s Undergraduate Studies Catalog. A student’s required general education requirements will vary depending on the student’s matriculation (entrance) date and transfer status. Each student’s general education requirements are specified in their Degree Audit Report (DARS); DARS is available on the Web.
  9. Transfer Course and Grade Policy: In general, a grade of “C-” or higher is required for transferred courses to be used to satisfy prerequisite, corequisite, business core, and specialty area course requirements. However, accounting majors need to earn a grade of “C” or higher in any accounting course (ACC prefix) that is to be transferred.
  10. Requests for Transfer Credit: The College maintains a large database of transfer course equivalencies. Courses from other schools are often automatically transferred as equivalent to a specific SUNY Brockport course. If a course has been transferred as equivalent to a SUNY Brockport course, the equivalency will be shown on the student’s DARS report.

    Other times, however, courses are transferred for general credit, but no specific course equivalency is indicated on DARS. If you believe that a course taken elsewhere is equivalent to a specific SUNY Brockport course, you will need to complete a course equivalency transfer request form (available in 119 Hartwell Hall) and provide documentation of equivalency (e.g., a detailed syllabus). Submit the form and the documentation to the secretary of the department that offers the course. Your request will then be evaluated in accordance with the department-specific process for evaluation of transfer requests.

    Except as noted below, students completing any of the department’s programs may request transfer credit for (1) any prerequisite course, and (2) any 300-level course not restricted by residency requirements. The student cannot receive transfer credit unless both the department and the College approve the transferred courses, and the number of courses transferred is subject to the residency requirements of the College and department.

    After matriculating at SUNY Brockport (formal admission to the College), students must take all 400-level accounting, business, and economics courses at SUNY Brockport. Freshman-level courses taken at two-year colleges generally cannot be transferred as equivalent to 300-level courses, and no two-year college course work will be transferred as equivalent to any 400-level course. Students must complete BUS 475 Strategic Management at SUNY Brockport.

    Note: A separate set of policies applies to CIS 106 (End User Computing) and ENL 308 (Business Writing). These courses are not generally accepted from other institutions. However, these courses may be waived under certain circumstances. Information on specific conditions and the process for waiver of these courses is available in the department office (119 Hartwell Hall).

  11. Residency Requirement: At least one half of the course work required to complete any department major or minor must be taken at SUNY Brockport. Additionally, as noted in section 10 above, certain courses cannot be transferred. These courses must be taken at SUNY Brockport.

  12. Participation in Assessment Activities: The Department of Business Administration and Economics administers various assessment instruments throughout the curricula of its programs. Assessment activities may take the form of exams, exercises, or surveys. Assessment data is used for quality control and program improvement. Many of the department’s program improvement efforts are based on assessment results.

    However, assessment results are valid only when students give their serious participation and best effort. As such, students are required, as a condition of enrollment in any of the department’s courses, to participate in assessment activities and to give their best and honest effort in all assessment exercises administered by the department. Assessment activities administered in a course are considered a course requirement. This course requirement is no less important than is attendance, homework, or other exams. Students who are absent when assessment exercises are conducted may be required to repeat the exercise as a condition of passing the course.

  13. Internships: The department encourages student participation in internship experiences that are relevant to the student’s degree and area of specialization. Increasingly, employers seek to hire individuals with relevant work experience. An internship is not required for graduation, but students without significant work experience (relevant to their major) are strongly encouraged to complete at least one internship experience. The Department of Business Administration and Economics limits the number of credits and internship experiences a student may complete to a maximum of 15 credits and two internship experiences. Information on internship programs and procedures may be obtained in 110 Hartwell Hall.

  14. Academic Dishonesty (Cheating): The definitions of academic dishonesty are provided in a College publication entitled Your Right To Know & Academic Policies Handbook . Students in the department’s programs are bound by the definitions and policies described in Your Right To Know & Academic Policies Handbook . The department reserves the right to expel, from its programs and courses, any student found to be engaged in premeditated acts of academic dishonesty. This policy is strictly enforced. Your first offense will be your only offense; there are no warnings.

    All work and assignments completed in the department’s courses should be assumed to be individual assignments unless you have received explicit permission from the instructor to work with one or more partners.

    The Your Right To Know & Academic Policies Handbook is produced for distribution every fall. It contains important information every student should know about campus safety, codes of student conduct, and more. You can stop by the office of the Division of Student Affairs on the sixth floor of the Allen Administration Building to pick up a copy.

  15. Student Conduct: Students are expected to treat each other, their instructor, persons in charge, and the department’s staff with common courtesy, decency and respect. Students will recognize the instructor’s authority to lead and direct classroom activities. Students will refrain from all behaviors that interfere with the teaching and learning process as well as behaviors that are disrespectful or belligerent to faculty and staff. All behaviors that, in the judgment of the instructor, interfere with the teaching/learning process will be considered disruptive.

    Campus policies on disruptive behavior and students are detailed in the Your Right To Know & Academic Policies Handbook document (referenced in section 14 above). Disruptive students may be asked by the instructor to leave the classroom; students refusing to do so will be escorted from the premises by University Police. Students who are consistently or seriously disruptive will be dismissed from the department’s programs and may be expelled from the College.

  16. Course Prerequisites: Many of the department’s courses have prerequisite courses. The College catalog details the prerequisites for all established courses; for new courses not listed in the catalog, students should speak with the instructor. The prerequisites for a course must be completed prior to registration for the course. Students who are found to be deficient in the prerequisites for a course may be dropped from the course.

    In particular, the courses BUS 325 Principles of Finance and BUS 475 Strategic Management have a sizeable number of prerequisites. Students who fail to complete prerequisites for these courses in a planned and timely basis are likely to find that they will not be able to graduate as planned.

  17. Timely Completion of Program Entrance Requirement: Students admitted to the College are not automatically admitted to the department’s programs. Students must first meet program entrance requirements, which include prescribed prerequisite course work. Prerequisite courses vary by degree program. There are prerequisite requirements for all department majors and some minors.

    • Full-time students entering as freshmen are expected to complete prerequisite course work by the first semester of their junior year.
    • Full-time students transferring with an associates degree in business are expected to complete prerequisite course work in their first semester at Brockport.
    • Part-time students are expected to complete prerequisite courses before beginning 300- level business courses.

    Timely completion of program prerequisites is the student’s responsibility. Failure to complete program entrance requirements on a timely basis may delay the student’s graduation.

  18. Separation from the College: If a student chooses to leave the College prior to graduation, a leave of absence should be filed with the Career Services Separations Office (Rakov Center). Leaves of absence expire after one year and if the student returns at a later date to complete the degree, the student will need to reapply to the College. Further, the student will need to complete the (potentially new) degree requirements in effect at time of readmission. This includes any changes in the major and in the General Education requirements of the College. Students, therefore, are strongly advised not to separate from the College prior to completing their degrees.

  19. Department Communications: The department uses an e-mail list-server to communicate important announcements, changes in class times and course offerings, new policies, information about department events, etc.

    • Students are responsible for reading communications from the department and responding accordingly.
    • Department communiques will be directed to the student e-mail address provided by the College. Students using a different e-mail account are responsible for redi- recting messages from their SUNY Brockport account to their preferred e-mail address. Call the Information Technology Help Desk at (585) 395-5151 for assistance in this regard.
    • The department’s e-mail list-serve is for official department communiques only, and all communiques will originate from the department office. Under no circumstance is any student allowed to broadcast messages using this list-serve. Unauthorized use of the list-serve will be taken very seriously and the offender referred to the campus Judicial System for appropriate action.

Business Administration Major

The Business Administration Major prepares students to assume entry-level positions in an organization’s accounting, financial, marketing and management systems. It also offers excellent preparation for graduate or law school study. Students are able to specialize in accounting, finance, marketing, management, and pre-law.

Business Administration Degree Requirements
All business administration majors are bound by the policies, terms and conditions described earlier in the section above titled “Guidelines and Policies Pertaining to All Department Programs and Courses.” Business administration majors must complete all SUNY Brockport General Education requirements and degree requirements for students earning the Bachelor of Science. In addition to prescribed business course work, students majoring in business administration must complete a minimum of 60 credits of non-business, non-accounting course work. Up to nine credits of economics courses and up to six credits of statistics may be included in this 60-credit total. Students earning a degree in business administration must complete four groups of courses: (1) prerequisites, (2) corequisites, (3) the business core, and (4) a specialization of their choosing (accounting, finance, management, marketing, or pre-law). See “Course Requirements for the Business Administration Major” below for details.

Course-Grade and GPA Requirements for the Major in Business Administration
Students pursuing the business administration major must satisfy four course-grade and GPA requirements as follows:

  1. A student’s cumulative GPA in the prerequisite courses is used to determine whether the student will be admitted to the major. Students must earn a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the prerequisite courses, with no grade lower than “C-,” to be granted admission to the major in business administration. Transfer grades are included in this GPA.
  2. Students must earn a grade of at least “C-” in each course used to satisfy a business administration major requirement. This applies to the prerequisite, corequisite, business core, and specialization course requirements described in Course Requirements for the Business Administration Major” below.
  3. Students must earn an overall cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in the SUNY Brockport courses used to satisfy the corequisite, business core, and specialization course requirements described in “Course Requirements for the Business Administration Major” below.
  4. All General Education, upper-division (300/400 level) course work, and GPA requirements of SUNY Brockport must be met, including an overall cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in all SUNY Brockport course work used to meet bachelor’s degree requirements.

Course Requirements for the Business Administration Major
Students must satisfy prerequisite, corequisite, business core, and specialization course requirements as specified below. Students may complete multiple specializations, but should remember that a maximum of 54 credits of course work with a BUS prefix, including transferred courses, internships, and independent studies, can be applied towards the 120 credits required to graduate.

1. Prerequisite Course Requirements (21 credits, must be completed before declaring the major): Prerequisite courses provide a foundation for upper-division course work. As described in “Course Grade and GPA Requirements for the Major in Business Administration” above, grades in prerequisite courses are used to determine admission to the major.

 
Credits
CIS 106 End-user Computing
3
ECN 201 Principles of Economics - Micro
3
ECN 202 Principles of Economics - Macro
3
ECN 204 Introduction to Statistics
3
ACC 281 Introduction to Financial Accounting
3
ACC 282 Introduction to Managerial Accounting
3
MTH 201 Calculus I (or MTH 221 Calculus for Business)
3
Total:
21

Notes:
(1) It is expected that full-time students will complete all prerequisite courses no later than the first semester of their junior year. Part-time students should complete prerequisites before beginning 300-level business courses.

(2) An introductory statistics course from another discipline (e.g., psychology) may be substituted for ECN 204. However, credit towards graduation will be allowed for only one introductory statistics course.

2. Major Course Requirements
Completion of the business major requires a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in the corequisite, core, and specialty area courses requirements specified in 2a, 2b, and 2c below. Students must earn a grade of at least “C-” in each course to satisfy degree requirements.

2a. Corequisites Requirements (9 credits)
Credits
ENL 308 Business Writing
3
ECN 304 Intermediate Statistics AND
3
one of the following four courses:
3
BUS 317 Management Information Systems
BUS 461 Production and Operations Management
Total:
9

Note: BUS 317 and BUS 461 may be taken to satisfy the corequisite requirement, or as a management specialty elective, but not both. Each course meets only one requirement.

Corequisite Requirements for Finance Specialty  
ENL 308 Business Writing
3
ECN 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3
ECN 304 Intermediate Statistics
3
Total:
9

 

2b. Business Core Requirements (21 credits)
Credits
BUS 325 Principles of Finance
3
BUS 335 Principles of Marketing
3
BUS 345 International Business Environment
3
BUS 366 Organizational Behavior
3
BUS 375 Business Law I
3
BUS 378 Business, Government, and Society
3
BUS 475 Strategic Management
3
Total:
21

Note: BUS 475 must be taken at SUNY Brockport.

2c. Business Specialty Options (12-15 credits)
Students must complete at least one of the specialty areas described below. Students may take additional specialty courses on an elective basis. Note that, if the accounting or pre-law specialization is selected, at least five courses must be completed. Regardless of which area of specialization is selected, students should consult with their academic advisor to determine which combination of specialty area courses is most consistent with the student’s professional goals. After matriculating at SUNY Brockport, students must take all 400-level business and economics courses at SUNY Brockport.

Accounting Specialty (15 credits)
The accounting specialization is intended for students who have an interest in an accounting-related career, but who are also certain that they do not wish to pursue licensing as a Certified Public Accountant. Students with an interest in accounting should give serious consideration to completing a major in accounting. For details, see Majors in Accounting below.

 
Credits
ACC 385 Intermediate Accounting I
3
ACC 386 Intermediate Accounting II
3
ACC 388 Cost Accounting
3
ACC 485 Federal Income Tax
3
ACC 486 Advanced Accounting
3
ACC 487 Auditing
3
ACC 488 Federal Income Tax II
3
ACC 489 Accounting for Nonprofit Entities
3

Note: (1) A minimum of 12 credits of upper-level accounting must be taken at SUNY Brockport, including all 400-level accounting courses.

Finance Specialty (12 credits)
Finance specialty courses are appropriate for students who have an interest in a finance-related career, including corporate financial analysis, cash management, brokerage, banking, investment banking, marketing financial instruments and insurance, and personal financial and estate planning. In addition to providing a solid foundation for graduate work in business and finance, the specialty also prepares students to pursue professional certification, including the Certified Treasury Professional ® (formerly Certified Cash Manager, CCM) exam, required for the CTP ® designation.

Finance students must take the following two courses:

 
Credits
BUS 421 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management
3
BUS 422 Corporate Financial Polic
3

 

Finance students must also select two electives from the list below.
At least one elective must be from group A.

Group A Finance Electives  
BUS 420 Short-term Financial Management
3
BUS 428 Seminar in Finance
3
BUS 445 International Financial Management
3
Group B Finance Electives  
ACC 385 Intermediate Accounting I
3
ACC 388 Cost Accounting
3
ECN 321 Money and Banking
3
ECN 425 Financial Institutions
3

Notes:
(1) Finance students must take ECN 302 to satisfy their corequisite requirement.
(2) Only one course from Group B may be used to satisfy finance specialty requirements. However, finance students are encouraged to take additional Group B courses as electives or to complete the economics minor.

 Management Specialty (12 credits)
The management specialization prepares students for success in a wide variety of management-related careers. Management students’ career options may include general management, human resource management, information systems management, operations management, retail management, and small business management. The specialty is also ideal for students seeking a general management degree, and is especially appropriate for those who envision going to graduate school and/or seeking promotions in their current career paths.

To complete the management specialty, students must take the following two courses:

 
Credits
BUS 368 Management Skills
3
BUS 369 Survey of Current Topics in Management
3

and two electives from the list below:

BUS 317 Management Information Systems
3
BUS 415 Data Management
3
BUS 417 Systems Analysis and Design
3
BUS 418 Advanced MIS (formerly BUS 318)
3
BUS 461 Production and Operations Management
3
BUS 462 Quality Management Systems
3
BUS 463 Small Business Management
3
BUS 464 Electronic Commerce
3
BUS 465 Human Resources Management
3
BUS 467 Employment Law and Compliance
3
BUS 468 Advanced Human Resources Management
3

Note: Neither BUS 317 nor BUS 461 may be counted for both the corequisite requirement and the specialty requirement.

Marketing Specialty (12 credits)
The marketing specialty prepares students for successful careers in business or marketing. Career opportunities in marketing are extensive and diversified, including opportunities in consumer and industrial sales, supply chain management, direct marketing, marketing management, marketing research, merchandising, promotion, public relations, sales management, and retail management. In addition, the marketing specialty provides an excellent foundation for students pursuing graduate studies in business or marketing. To complete the marketing specialty, students must successfully complete a minimum of four courses from the list below.

BUS 432 Sales Management
3
BUS 433 International Marketing
3
BUS 434 Direct Marketing
3
BUS 435 Consumer Behavior
3
BUS 436 Marketing Research
3
BUS 437 Integrated Marketing Communications
3
BUS 438 Supply Chain Management
3
BUS 439 Retail Management
3
BUS 440 Business-to-business Marketing
3
BUS 441 Marketing Management
3

Pre-law Specialty (15 credits )
Business Administration is one of the most popular pre-law degrees. The pre-law specialization is designed specifically for business students interested in attending law school. Students completing the specialization are able to make informed decisions about pursuing a law degree, elevate skills and cognitive abilities that are key to success in law school, and develop a fuller understanding of various aspects of the law, the legal profession, and the legal environment. Students who choose not to enter law school are able to pursue business-related careers and graduate programs.

To complete the pre-law specialty, students must complete the following three courses:

BUS 376 Business Law II
3
PLS 320 Law and the Legal Process OR CRJ 305 The Adjudication Process
3
CRJ 311 Criminal Law
3

and at least two electives from the list below:

ECN XXX: Any upper-division economics course not used to meet business corequisite requirements.
3
BUS 467 Employment Law and Compliance
3
CRJ 313 Constitutional Criminal Procedure
3
CRJ 315 Constitutional Law of the Detained
3
CRJ 438 Security Law
3
ENL 305 Advanced Composition
3
PHL 305 History of Modern Philosophy
3
PHL 342 Business Ethics OR PHL 321 Medical Ethics
3
PLS 324 Constitutional Law I
3
PLS 326 Constitutional Law II OR CRJ 483 Fair Trial/Free Press Conflicts
3

Notes

  1. Students may substitute an approved six-credit (or greater) internship for one of the elective courses listed above. PLS 492, 493, 495, and OAP 413 (in law practice), are all approved internship experiences. Other experiences may be used, provided that they are approved in writing by the student’s business advisor.
  2. Students completing this specialty should take PHL 102, 104, or 202 to satisfy a General Education humanities requirement. Students should consider using electives to take all three courses.
  3. Students in the pre-law specialty are encouraged to complete a minor in economics, criminal justice, philosophy, or political science. Students may also wish to complete a second specialization in the business administration program.
  4. Students may wish to consult with Dr. John Keiser, area coordinator for pre-law, in designing their program.

Majors in Accounting

The department offers two degrees in accounting, each leading to a Bachelor of Science in Accounting. The first is the 120-hour accounting major designed for individuals pursuing careers as accountants in business, government, or not-for-profit organizations. Students completing this degree are qualified to sit for the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) exam. Students completing this degree prior to August 1, 2009 are also qualified to sit for the Uniform Certified Public Accounting exam (CPA), if registered for the exam before August 1, 2009.

The second degree in accounting, referred to as the “Bachelor of Science In Professional Accounting,” is the 150-hour accounting major designed for students who wish to qualify for the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam in New York state and pursue careers in public accounting as Certified Public Accountants. This degree pertains to students who sit for the Uniform CPA exam in New York after August 1, 2009. This degree program should be pursued by students matriculating as freshmen after August 1, 2004, assuming those students plan to complete college according to a traditional schedule (completing approximately 30 credits per year).

Note: Effective fall 2004, students who wish to sit for the CPA exam in New York state must complete a program in accounting with a minimum of 150 hours if completion of the program and registration for the CPA exam occur after August 1, 2009. Students completing a registered program consisting of 120 hours must do so before August 1, 2009 AND also register to sit for the CPA exam prior to August 1, 2009. It is highly recommended that students work closely with their academic advisors on meeting degree requirements for the CPA exam.

Accounting Degree Requirements Prior to August 1, 2009

All accounting majors are bound by the policies, terms and conditions described earlier in the section titled “Guidelines and Policies Pertaining to All Department Programs and Courses.” In order to graduate, and to meet the New York state requirements for taking the CPA exam prior to August 1, 2009 accounting majors must complete a minimum 60 credits of prescribed business and accounting course work plus a minimum 60 credits of non-business, non-accounting, liberal-arts course work. In completing the required minimum 60 credits of non-business, non-accounting course work, students should ensure that they have met all SUNY Brockport General Education requirements and degree requirements for students earning a bachelor of science. Accounting majors must work closely with their advisor to determine the applicability of both their accounting and non-accounting courses toward the requirements for this degree.

Students majoring in accounting within the 120-credit program must complete four groups of courses: (1) prerequisites, (2) corequisites, (3) business core courses, and (4) a prescribed series of upper-division accounting courses. Students completing the 150-credit program for a major in accounting must complete the four groups mentioned above plus two additional groups: (5) business electives and/or business internship and (6) computer information systems courses. See “Course Requirements” for both accounting majors below for details. Students without significant work experience relevant to accounting are strongly encouraged to complete at least one internship experience.

Course-Grade and GPA Requirements for the Majors in Accounting
Students pursuing an accounting major must meet six course-grade and GPA requirements as follows:

  1. Any course with an ACC prefix, which is counted toward the degree requirements, must be completed with a grade no lower than “C.” This includes program prerequisites, corequisites, and upper-division course work.
  2. Accounting majors must earn a grade of at least “C-” in all other courses used to satisfy a major requirement within the accounting major.
  3. A student’s cumulative GPA in the prerequisite courses is used to determine whether a student will be admitted to the major. Currently, students must earn a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the prerequisite courses, with no grade in an ACC-prefix course lower than “C” and no other grade lower than “C-.” Transfer grades are included in this GPA calculation.
  4. Students must earn an overall cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in the SUNY Brockport courses used to satisfy corequisite, business core, upper-level accounting, business electives and/or business internship, and computer information systems course requirements specified in “Course Requirements for the Accounting Major” below.
  5. All General Education, upper-division (300/400 level) course work, and GPA requirements of SUNY Brockport must be met, including an overall cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in all SUNY Brockport course work used to meet bachelor’s degree requirements.
  6. No courses graded “Pass/Fail” or “Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory” may be counted toward accounting degree requirements.

Transfer Course and Grade Policy: Accounting students are bound by the policies concerning transfer courses and grades described earlier in the section titled “Guidelines and Policies Pertaining to All Department Programs and Courses.” A grade of “C” or higher is required to transfer accounting courses (ACC prefix); other required business and economics courses must be completed with a grade of at least “C-.” In general, the department’s accounting course numbered ACC 386 cannot be transferred. A minimum of 12 credits of 300/400-level accounting course work, including all required 400-level courses, must be taken at SUNY Brockport.

Participation in Assessment Activities: Accounting students are bound by the policies concerning assessment activities described earlier in the section titled “Guidelines and Policies Pertaining to All Department Programs and Courses.” In addition to other required assessment exams, accounting majors are required to participate in an Accounting Assessment Exam given in ACC 487 Auditing every semester. Failure to participate in these assessment activities may result in students receiving an “E” grade for courses.

Course Requirements for the Accounting Major (Prior to August 1, 2009)

1. Prerequisite Course Requirements (21 credits)
Students must earn a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the following seven prerequisite courses, with no grade lower than “C” in courses with an ACC prefix and no grade below “C-” in the other courses to earn admission to the major.

CIS 106 End-user Computing
3
ECN 201 Principles of Economics (Micro)
3
ECN 202 Principles of Economics (Macro)
3
ECN 204 Introduction to Statistics
3
ACC 281 Introduction to Financial Accounting
3

ACC 282 Introduction to Managerial Accounting

3
MTH 201 Calculus I OR MTH 221 Calculus for Business
3
TOTAL
21

Note: An elementary statistics course from another discipline may be substituted for ECN 204. However, credit will be allowed for only one introductory statistics course.

2. Major Course Requirements
Completion of the accounting major requires a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in the courses taken under 2a, 2b, and 2c below, with no grade less than “C” in ACC-prefix courses and no grade less than “C-” in all other courses.

2a. Corequisite Courses (12 credits)
Professional Skills Corequisites: Credits

Professional Skills Corequisites: Credits
ENL 308 Business Writing
3
ACC 283 Introduction to Accounting Systems and Software
3
Analytical Skills Corequisites
ECN 304 Intermediate Statistics
3
AND one of the following four courses:
ECN 301 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
ECN 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3
ECN 305 Managerial Economics
3
BUS 461 Production and Operations Management
3
 
TOTAL
12

Note: (1): ECN 301 and 305 may not both be taken for credit.

2b. Business Core Courses (24 credits) Credits

BUS 325 Principles of Finance
3
BUS 335 Principles of Marketing
3
BUS 345 International Business Environment
3
BUS 366 Organizational Behavior
3
BUS 375 Business Law I
3
BUS 376 Business Law II
3
BUS 475 Strategic Management
3
AND one of the following four finance electives:
BUS 420 Short-term Financial Management
BUS 421 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management
BUS 422 Corporate Financial Policy
ECN 321 Money and Banking
TOTAL
24

Note: BUS 475 Strategic Management must be taken at SUNY Brockport.

2c. Upper-level Accounting Courses (21 credits)

ACC 385 Intermediate Accounting I 3
ACC 386 Intermediate Accounting II 3
ACC 388 Cost Accounting 3
ACC 485 Federal Income Tax I 3
ACC 486 Advanced Accounting 3
ACC 487 Auditing 3
ACC 488 Federal Income Tax II 3
TOTAL 21

Note: All 400-level accounting courses must be taken at SUNY Brockport.

3. Other Requirements:
In addition to the major course work described above, accounting majors must meet all of SUNY Brockport’s General Education requirements. Further, in order to meet the New York state requirements (prior to August 1, 2009) for sitting for the CPA exam, accounting majors must complete 60 credits of non-business, non-accounting liberal arts course work. These students need to work closely with their advisor to understand which of their courses count toward this required minimum 60 credits. Because of the 60-credit liberal arts minimum under CPA Exam requirements, accounting majors are limited in the number of additional (elective) business or accounting courses that can be used toward the 120 credits required for the degree. Again, it is very important for students, especially transfer students, pursuing the accounting major and completing the 120-hour program, to work closely with their advisor to understand the limitations on the number of business and accounting courses that can be counted toward the 120-credit graduation requirement for the CPA exam.

Course Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Professional Accounting (150 Credits Bachelor of Science, required for those enrolling for the CPA exam in New York state after August 1, 2009):

1. Prerequisite Course Requirements (21 credits )
Students must earn a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the following seven prerequisite courses, with no grade lower than “C” in courses with an ACC prefix and no grade below “C-” in the other courses to earn admission to the major.

CIS 106 End-user Computing
3
ECN 201 Principles of Economics (Micro)
3
ECN 202 Principles of Economics (Macro)
3
ECN 204 Introduction to Statistics
3
ACC 281 Introduction to Financial Accounting
3

ACC 282 Introduction to Managerial Accounting

3
MTH 201 Calculus I OR MTH 221 Calculus for Business
3
TOTAL
21

Note: An elementary statistics course from another discipline may be substituted for ECN 204. However, credit will be allowed for only one introductory statistics course.

2. Major Course Requirements
Completion of the accounting major requires a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in the courses taken under 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d and 2e below, with no grade less than “C” in ACC-prefix courses and no grade less than “C-” in all other courses.

2a. Corequisite Courses (12 credits)
Professional Skills Corequisites:
Credits
ENL 308 Business Writing
3
ACC 283 Introduction to Accounting Systems and Software
3
Analytical Skills Corequisites
ECN 304 Intermediate Statistics
3
AND one of the following four courses:
ECN 301 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
ECN 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3
ECN 305 Managerial Economics
3
BUS 461 Production and Operations Management
3
 
TOTAL
12

Note: (1): ECN 301 and 305 may not both be taken for credit.

2b. Business Core Courses (33 credits)
Credits
BUS 317 Management Information Systems
3
BUS 325 Principles of Finance
3
BUS 335 Principles of Marketing
3
BUS 345 International Business Environment
3
BUS 366 Organizational Behavior
3
BUS 375 Business Law I
3
BUS 376 Business Law II
3
BUS 417 Systems Analysis and Design
3
BUS 464 E-Commerce
3
BUS 475 Strategic Management
3
AND one of the following four finance electives:
3
BUS 420 Short-term Financial Management
BUS 421 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management
BUS 422 Corporate Financial Policy
ECN 321 Money and Banking
TOTAL
33

Note: BUS 475 Strategic Management must be taken at SUNY Brockport

2c. Upper-level Accounting Courses (25 credits)
Credits
ACC 385 Intermediate Accounting I
3
ACC 386 Intermediate Accounting II
3
ACC 388 Cost Accounting
3
ACC 389 Accounting Profession Seminar
1
ACC 485 Federal Income Tax I
3
ACC 486 Advanced Accounting
3
ACC 487 Auditing
3
ACC 488 Federal Income Tax II
3
ACC 489 Accounting for Not-for-Profit Entities
3
TOTAL
25

Note: All 400-level accounting courses must be taken at SUNY Brockport.

2 d. Business Electives and/or Business Internship (6 credits)
Credits
Any combination of elective business courses and/or business internship
6
Total:
6

 

2e. Computer Information Systems Courses (10 credits)
Credits
CSC 120 Introduction to Computer Science
3
CSC 203 Fundamentals of Computer Science
4
And one of the following computer information systems courses:
3
CIS 419 Computer Networks and Internet Applications
CIS 422 Physical Design and Implementation of DBMS
CIS 427 Project Management and Practice
Total:
10

3. Other Requirements: In addition to the major course work described above, students must meet all of SUNY Brockport’s General Education requirements. Further, in order to meet the New York state requirements (after August 1, 2009) to sit for the CPA exam, accounting majors completing the 150 hour program must complete a minimum 60 credits of non-business, non-accounting liberal arts course work. Total liberal arts course work (non-business, non-accounting) cannot exceed 80 credits. Students need to work closely with their advisor to understand which of their courses count toward this required minimum 60 credits (maximum 80 credits). Because of the minimum 60-credit liberal arts requirement under CPA Exam requirements, accounting majors pursuing careers as CPAs are limited in the number of additional (elective) business or accounting courses that can be used toward the 150 credits required for the degree. Total course work in business and accounting combined cannot exceed 90 hours. It is very important for all students, including transfer students, pursuing careers as CPAs to work closely with their academic advisor to understand the limitations on the number of business and accounting courses that can be counted towards the 150-credit graduation requirement for the CPA exam.

International Business and Economics Major

The international business and economics major provides an interdisciplinary education that includes foreign-language proficiency and cross-cultural awareness. Students gain knowledge and develop skills relevant to conducting business in the international domain. Graduates are prepared for careers with organizations with international operations.

International Business and Economics Degree Requirements
All international business majors are bound by the policies, terms and conditions described earlier in the section titled “Guidelines and Policies Pertaining to All Department Programs and Courses.” International business majors must complete all SUNY Brockport General Education requirements and degree requirements for students earning a Bachelor of Arts. In addition to prescribed business course work, students majoring in international business must complete a minimum of 60 credits of non-business, non-accounting course work. Up to nine credits of economics courses and up to six credits of statistics may be included in this 60-credit total.

The international business and economics major requires completion of 15 credits of prerequisite courses (I below), 27 credits of international business core courses (II below), foreign-language proficiency at the 212 (four-semester) level or higher (see III below), 12 credits of cross-cultural core courses (IV below), and a significant foreign experience (V below). See “Course Requirements for the International Business and Economics Major” and “Course-Grade and GPA Requirements for the International Business and Economics Major” below for details.

Course-Grade and GPA Requirements for the International Business and Economics Major Students pursuing the international business and economics major must satisfy four course-grade and GPA requirements as follows:

  1. A student’s cumulative GPA in the prerequisite courses is used to determine whether a student will be admitted to the major. Students must earn a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the prerequisite courses, with no grade lower than “C-,” to declare the major in international business and economics.
  2. Students must earn a grade of at least “C-” in each course used to satisfy prerequisite and international business core courses specified in “Course Requirements for the International Business and Economics Major” below.
  3. Completion of the international business and economics major requires an overall cumulative GPA of 2.0 in the courses used to satisfy the international business core, foreign-language, cross-cultural core, and foreign experience requirements specified in “Course Requirements for the International Business and Economics Major” below.
  4. All General Education, upper-division (300/400-level) course work, and GPA require- ments of SUNY Brockport must be met, including an overall cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in all SUNY Brockport course work used to meet bachelor’s degree requirements.

Course Requirements for the International Business and Economics Major
Students must satisfy (1) prerequisite, (2) international business core, (3) foreign lnguage, (4) cross-cultural core and (5) foreign-experience requirements as specified below.

1. Prerequisite Course Requirements (15 credits must be completed before declaring the major)
Prerequisite courses provide a foundation for upper-division course work. As described in Course Grade and GPA Requirements for the Major in International Business above, grades in prerequisite courses are used to determine admission to the major.

 
Credits
ECN 201 Principles of Economics (Micro)
3
ECN 202 Principles of Economics (Macro)
3
ECN 204 Introduction to Statistics
3
ACC 281 Introduction to Financial Accounting
3
MTH 2XX Calculus-level Math requirement (see 2 below)
3
TOTAL
15

Notes:

  1. It is expected that full-time students will complete all prerequisite courses no later than the first semester of their junior year. Part-time students should complete prerequisites before undertaking a substantial number of 300-level business courses.
  2. The MTH 2XX requirement is typically satisfied by taking Calculus I (MTH 201), Business Calculus (MTH 221), or Finite Math (MTH 245). However, any mathematics course at or above the level of MTH 201 (excluding MTH 243, 313 and 441) can be used to satisfy the math requirement.
  3. Students are encouraged to take both ACC 281 and 282.
  4. An introductory statistics course from another discipline (e.g., psychology) may be substituted for ECN 204. However, credit towards graduation will be allowed for only one introductory statistics course.

2. International Business Core Requirements (27 credits)

 
Credits
BUS 317 Introduction to Management Information Systems
3
BUS 325 Principles of Finance
3
BUS 335 Principles of Marketing
3
BUS 345 International Business Environment
3
BUS 433 International Marketing
3
BUS 445 International Financial Management
3
BUS 462 Quality Management Systems
3
ECN 443 International Economics
3
ECN 453 International Business Seminar
3
TOTAL
27

Note: CIS 106 is the prerequisite for BUS 317.

3. Foreign Language (3 or more credits assumed)
Credits
One 212 level or higher course in a foreign or second language.
3

 

4. Cross-cultural Core (12 credits)
Credits
Four cross-cultural courses (see Suggested Cross-cultural Courses below)
12

Cross-cultural courses are typically upper division, internationally focused, social science courses focusing on current cultural issues. With the written approval of the student’s advisor, an appropriate internship may also be used to satisfy up to six hours of this requirement.

5. Additional Requirement: Foreign Experience (required for graduation)

Students are required to participate in a significant foreign experience. Subject to written approval of the student’s advisor and the department, this requirement can be satisfied by (1) completing an overseas (foreign country) internship, (2) participating in a study abroad program, (3) completing an appropriate domestic internship (typically with a local business heavily engaged in international commerce), or (4) completion of two 300-level courses in a foreign language with a grade of “C-” or higher in each course. International business majors may not graduate without completing the foreign experience requirement.

In completing the foreign experience requirement, international business and economics majors can take advantage of one of SUNY Brockport’s many opportunities to study abroad. Overseas programs may take the form of traditional studies or an internship program. With one of the largest study abroad programs in the nation, SUNY Brockport has programs in England, France, Costa Rica, Mexico, Australia, Ghana, Jamaica, Russia, Germany, The Netherlands and many other locations. Summer programs include countries such as Greece, Australia, Mexico, England and Costa Rica. Internship opportunities are available with many organizations and businesses in Australia, Canada, England, Mexico, Costa Rica, Scotland and Germany.

Suggested Cross-cultural Courses
The following courses are approved for use in satisfying cross-cultural core requirements. Additional and/or alternative courses may be approved by the department for inclusion in the cross-cultural core. The department maintains an updated list of qualified courses in Hartwell Hall, Room 119.

AAS 302 History of South Africa  
AAS 317 Prejudice, Personality and Culture (every semester)  
AAS 360 Africa Today (every semester) (A,D,I,W)  
AAS 404 Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa  
AAS 408 Pan-Africanism (fall)  
AAS 420 Overseas Seminar in Africa (1-15 Cr.)  
AAS 460 Modern Africa (I)  
AAS 485 The Jamaica Seminars  
ANT 322 Culture and Power  
ANT 315 The Migration Experience (spring (I,W)  
ANT 316 Food and Culture (I, W)  
ANT 321Culture Change (spring) (I,W)  
ANT 330 (AJ) World Poverty and Underdevelopment  
ANT 332 (AJ) China in Transition  
CMC 418 Cross-cultural Communication  
CRJ 465 Terrorism and the Criminal Justice System  
CRJ 451 International Criminal Justice Systems  
DCC 310 Human Heritage and Experince  
DCC 315 Society and Culture II  
ENL 353 The Bible and Modernism (C, I)  
ENL 357 Postmodern Culture  
ENL 366 Arabic Culture and the West  
ENL 455 Sociolinguistics  
ENL 474 Caribbean Literature (W)  
ENL 495 Literature of the Holocaust (I,W)  
FCE 375 Latin-American Women (C,I,W)  
FCE 420 Multiculturalism in the USA  
FRN 325 France Today  
FRN 355 France Under the Fifth Republic  
HST 341 Middle East Crisis  
HST 343 (AJ) History of the Soviet Union  
HST 361 History of Japan  
HST 363 Islam  
HST 364 History of Britain (spring)  
HST 376 Modern Latin America  
HST 388 Traditional China  
HST 389 Modern China  
HST 421 America Since 1929 (spring)  
HST 424 United States and the World  
HST 434 Modern Caribbean History  
HST 438 Women and Gender in Latin American History  
HST 460 (I) Modern Africa  
HST 467 Modern South Asia (C)  
PLS 304 International Relations Simulations  
PLS 305 Politics of European Integration  
PLS 333 American Foreign Policy  
PLS 338 Global Issues  
PLS 340 European Political System  
PLS 342 Latin-American Politics  
PLS 343 Canadian Politics and Society  
PLS 346 Russian and Eastern European Politics  
PLS 348 Asian Politics  
PLS 383 Mid-East in World Politics  
PLS 410 International Political Economy  
PLS 444 National Security  
PLS 470 Nationalism  
PLS 475 Political Geography  
PSH 437 Psychology and Jewish Studies  
REL 315 International Tourism  
SOC 306 Development and Globalization  
SOC 317 Prejudice, Personality and Culture  
SOC 325 Social Class, Status and Power  
SOC 464 Gender and Social Change  
SPN 352 Hispanic World Today  
SPN 353 Literature and Cultures of Spain I  
SPN 363 Literature and Cultures of Spain II  
SWO 321 Human Diversity  
WMS 323 History of European and American Women  
WMS 375 Latin American Women  
WMS 438 Women and Gender in Latin American History  

Minor in Business Administration

All students pursuing the minor in business are bound by the policies, terms and conditions described earlier in the section above titled “Guidelines and Policies Pertaining to All Department Programs and Courses.” A minor in business consists of 21 credits of selected business and economics course work as described in “Course Requirements” below, with a minimum of 12 credits of course work completed at SUNY Brockport. A student’s cumulative GPA, in the Brockport courses used to satisfy requirements of the minor, must be at least 2.0.

Declaring the Minor in Business Administration
To declare the minor in business administration, students are required to have (1) a 3.0 GPA or higher over a minimum of 30 credits, and (2) a grade of “B” or better in one of the following math courses: MTH 121, 122, 201, 202, 221, 245 or 281. Students not meeting the GPA requirement may petition the department to be allowed to declare the minor but only extreme, extenuating circumstances will even be considered for such a waiver; students who do not meet these grade requirements should assume they will NOT be permitted to declare and complete the minor. Students should declare the minor in business immediately after completing any one of the required courses. It is important to declare a minor as soon as possible as it will allow the department to plan for enrollments and ensure that an adequate number of course seats are available for students enrolled in the minor in business administration. The forms required to declare the minor are available in 119 Hartwell Hall.

Course Requirements
Credits
ECN 201 or 202 Introductory Economics(or ECN 100)
3
ACC 280 Introduction to Accounting
3
ECN 204 Introduction to Statistics or equivalent
3
BUS 325 Principles of Finance
3
(prerequisites include MTH 121 or equivalent)
BUS 335 Principles of Marketing
3
BUS 365 Principles of Management
3
One additional BUS/ECN course at the 300/400 level, excluding BUS 366
3
Total:
21

Notes:

  1. Students may substitute the ACC 281 and ACC 282 sequence for ACC 280.
  2. An introductory statistics course from another discipline (e.g., psychology) may be substituted for ECN 204. However, credit towards graduation will be allowed for only one introductory statistics course.
  3. Students must complete the minor with an overall GPA of 2.0 in the courses taken at SUNY Brockport.
  4. Students majoring in accounting, business administration, or international business and economics may not declare a business minor.
  5. The number of minors may be limited to ensure an adequate number of seats for business majors; students should declare the minor as soon as possible to ensure admission.

Advisement: The student’s advisor provides pre-registration approval for courses in the minor. Department faculty can serve as informal advisors in helping the student select the required upper-division elective course.

Minor in Economics
All students pursuing a minor in economics are bound by the policies, terms and conditions described earlier in the section above titled “Guidelines and Policies Pertaining to All Department Programs and Courses.”

A. Economics Minor with a Liberal Arts Major
Eighteen credits must be successfully completed, including: ECN 201, 202, 301, 302, and two additional upper-division economics courses. ECN 305 may be substituted for ECN 301, but both courses may not be taken for credit. A minimum of nine credits of course work must be completed at SUNY Brockport. A student’s cumulative GPA in the Brockport courses used to satisfy requirements of the minor must be at least 2.0.

B . Economics Minor with a Business Administration Major or Accounting Major
ECN 201, 202, 302, 304, and 301 or 305, plus one additional upper-division economics course must be successfully completed. A minimum of nine credits of course work must be completed at SUNY Brockport. A student’s cumulative GPA in the Brockport courses used to satisfy requirements of the minor must be at least 2.0. The minor in economics is not open to students majoring in international business and economics.

Minor in Finance
All students pursuing the minor in finance are bound by the policies, terms and conditions described earlier in the section above titled “Guidelines and Policies Pertaining to All Department Programs and Courses.” A minor in finance consists of 21 credits of selected business and economics course work as described in “Course Requirements” below, with a minimum of 12 credits of course work completed at SUNY Brockport. A student’s cumulative GPA, in the SUNY Brockport courses used to satisfy requirements of the minor, must be at least 2.0. The minor in finance is not open to declared majors in accounting, business administration, or international business and economics. The minor in finance is excellent preparation for students who are planning to take the actuary exam but are not majoring in a business discipline. Students are required to have successfully completed (C- or higher) CSC 104 or CIS106 or possess equivalent word processing and spreadsheet skills.

Course Requirements
Credits
ACC 280 or ACC 281 Introductory Accounting 3
3
ECN 201 Principles of Microeconomics
3
ECN 204 Introduction to Statistics
3
BUS 325 Principles of Finance
3
BUS 421 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management
3
BUS 422 Corporate Financial Policy
3

One additional finance elective chosen from BUS 420, BUS 428, BUS 445, or ECN 425

3
Total:
21

 

Note: Minors should carefully check the catalog to see if they have completed the prerequisites for the electives that they choose.

Departmental course descriptions are listed under Accounting (ACC), Business Administration (BUS) and Economics (ECN):

Note: Whenever the terms “MTH 121 or higher” or “MTH 201 or higher” are used, the following math courses are excluded: MTH 243, 313 and 441.

Note: All programs are subject to change and new programs may be offered, pending approval from all of the relevant authorities, including the College Senate, the College president, SUNY System Administration, and the New York State Department of Education. Interested parties should seek up-to-date information from the home page of the Department of Business Administration and Economics at www.brockport.edu/bus-econ/ or may contact the department office at (585) 395-2623.

Accounting Courses

ACC 280 Introduction to Accounting (B). Prerequisite: MTH 121 or equivalent. Surveys aspects of financial and managerial accounting with an emphasis on analysis and interpretation of financial statements and the preparation and uses of management reports for decision-making. Intended for majors outside the Department and does not meet the requirements for any majors offered by the Department. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ACC 281 Introduction to Financial Accounting (B). Prerequisite: MTH 121 or equivalent. Provides an introduction to generally accepted accounting principles used to classify, value, and record assets, liabilities, stockholder equity, revenues and expenses. Preparation, interpretation and analysis of financial statements are discussed. Also, the importance of accounting information for interested parties outside the enterprise is addressed. Ethical codes and professional conduct of accountants are examined. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ACC 282 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (B). Prerequisite: ACC 281. Provides an introduction to accounting information used by business managers to make short- and long-term decisions. Topics include cost accumulation and product costing, cost/volume/profit analysis, budgeting, standard costing and variance analysis, job order and process costing, activity-based costing, and capital budgeting. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ACC 283 Introduction to Accounting Systems and Software (B). Prerequisites: ACC 281 and CIS 106. Provides an introduction to accounting information systems. Topics include the role of the accountant in information systems, ethics issues, risks in information systems, ERP systems, e-commerce, business processes, internal control, documenting accounting information systems (task modeling) and REA model for data modeling. Computer software applications include Excel, Access, and a general ledger program with an extensive amount of software use required. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ACC 385 Intermediate Accounting I (B). Prerequisite: ACC 282. Covers the accounting cycle, generally accepted accounting principles, and preparation of general purpose financial statements in depth. Also addresses accounting measurements for cash, receivables, current liabilities, inventories, plant assets, and intangible assets. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ACC 386 Intermediate Accounting II (B). Prerequisite: ACC 385. Examines the theoretical, conceptual and procedural aspects of generally accepted accounting principles related to corporate bonds and notes, leases, pensions and stockholders' equity. Revenue recognition methods, accounting for income taxes, and preparation of the statement of cash flows are also examined. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ACC 388 Cost Accounting (B). Prerequisite: ACC 282. Focuses on the internal accounting problems of business dealing with cost behavior, cost accounting systems, budgeting, and performance measurement. Includes topics such as cost-volume-profit analysis, variance analysis, standard costing procedures, and managerial decision analysis. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ACC 389 Accounting Profession Seminar (B). Prerequisites: ACC 282, ACC 385 (may be taken concurrently). Develops the professional acumen of accounting students, consistent with the expectations of accounting firms. Examines accounting as a profession, focusing on expected professional comportment and work behaviors of accounting professionals. Requires students to conform to a mandatory dress code and to participate in events sponsored by professional accounting organizations. Accounting majors should complete this seminar in their junior year. 1 Cr. Fall

ACC 485 Federal Income Tax I (B). Prerequisites: ACC 385, ACC 283 and either MTH 201 or MTH 221. An introduction to the US Federal system of income taxation. Emphasis is on understanding conceptual basis of taxation and tax treatment of common transactions, including items of income, exclusion, deduction, and credit. Property transactions and tax research are introduced. In addition, the use of software to prepare tax returns is addressed. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ACC 486 Advanced Accounting (B). Prerequisites: ACC 283, ACC 386 and either MTH 201 or MTH 221. Examines accounting and reporting for partnerships, branch operations, consolidated financial statements, and multi-national corporations. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ACC 487 Auditing (B). Prerequisites: ACC 283, ACC 386 and either MTH 201 or MTH 221. Examines the theory, concepts, principles, and procedures under generally accepted auditing standards for external audits by CPAs. Topics include evidence, internal control, audit risk, statistical sampling, tests of controls, and substantive tests. The AICPA Code of Conduct and legal liability are also discussed, with the emphasis on ethical conduct and responsibility of auditors. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ACC 488 Federal Income Tax II (B). Prerequisites: ACC 283; ACC 485 and either MTH 201 or MTH 221. Examines the Federal income taxation of corporations, shareholders, partners and partnerships. Topics include tax effects of entity formation, operations, distributions and liquidations. Emphasizes factors in choosing a type of business entity. Estate and gift taxation are introduced. Tax software is used to prepare tax returns and to perform tax research. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ACC 489 Accounting for Not-for-Profit Entities (B). Prerequisites: ACC 386 and either MTH 201 or MTH 221. Examines the unique accounting characteristics of governmental and not-for-profit entities. Course content includes basic coverage of funds and fund accounting, as well as theory and procedures from GASB statements, including implementation of GASB standard No. 34. Students are introduced to the basic accounting procedures related to various funds, legally required budgetary accounts, financial statement preparation, proper footnote disclosure, and other reporting issues. 3 Cr. Spring

ACC 498 Accounting Internship (A). Prerequisite: ACC 283. Provides supervised experience in an accounting environment, with an opportunity to apply concepts learned in accounting course work. Also provides an opportunity for students to better understand (1) accounting career opportunities, (2) the accounting work culture, and (3) the high level of professional acumen required to be successful in accounting. Recommended for all accounting majors without accounting work experience. 1-6 Cr. Every Semester

ACC 499 Independent Study in Accounting (A). Prerequisites: ACC 283 and ACC 385. Allows students to pursue accounting topics and/or projects beyond those covered in regularly scheduled accounting courses. Arranged in consultation with the instructor-sponsor who will supervise and direct the student. Registration requires completion of forms prior to the beginning of the semester. 1-6 Cr. Every Semester

Business Courses

BUS 317 Introduction to Management Information Systems (A,T). Prerequisites: CIS 106 and either ACC 280 or ACC 281. Explores the use of information systems in organizations. Examines how different types of information systems are used to enhance performance of organizations, management, and employees. Introduces the systems development process and the management of information resources, including data, hardware, software, infrastructures and personnel. Introduces and applies the key theories and frameworks in the discipline, such as systems theory and value chains. Develops an intermediate level of end-user computing skills and assumes introductory-level knowledge of MS Office applications. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 325 Principles of Finance (A). Prerequisites: ACC 280 or 281, ECN 201 and 202, ECN 204, MTH 121 or higher. Provides a foundation in corporate financial decision-making. Covers the corporate environment, time value of money, risk and return, diversification, market efficiency, and valuation. Applies these concepts to financial analysis and planning, capital budgeting and financing. (Note: Declared minors in business may enroll in the course with ECN 100 or ECN 201 or ECN 202.) 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 335 Principles of Marketing (A). Examines the business function that identifies current unfilled needs and wants, defines and measures their magnitudes, determines which target markets the organization can best serve, and decides upon appropriate products, services, and programs to serve these markets. Topics include product development and test-marketing, product planning and new product introduction, and methods of product promotion and service marketing. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 345 International Business Environment (A). Analyzes the environmental aspects of foreign countries, the ability to promote trade with other countries, and the sovereign rights of other nations and their people. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 365 Principles of Management (A). Discusses the relationship of the management function with other functional areas, and provides an overview of the full span of managerial responsibilities in business organizations. Does not fulfill any requirement for any business administration major. Is a required course for business administration minors. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 366 Organizational Behavior (A). Prerequisites: ENL 308 and CIS 106. Examines individual behavior in organizational settings. Emphasis is given to the coordinated efforts of managing diverse work forces into fully functional organizational entities, highlighting theories and practices that facilitate motivation, control, and success of the organization. Includes topics such as human motivation, leadership, group dynamics, communications, organizational development, organizational culture, cross-cultural and global issues. Open to majors and intents only in business administration and accounting. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 368 Management Skills (A). Prerequisites: ENL 308 and CIS 106 . This course seeks to develop skills that are key to success as a manager, with emphasis on applying interpersonal, leadership, time management, conflict resolution, communication, team and presentation skills. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 369 Management Topics Seminar (A). Prerequisites: BUS 366, ENL 308 and CIS 106, or instructor's permission, declared majors only. Using business cases, contemporary examples and the business press, students explore topics pertinent to the management field. Projects and readings are both applied and analytical in content. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 375 Business Law I (A). Provides basic knowledge of the legal environment of business, including, but not limited to, the judicial system, criminal law, torts, and contracts. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 376 Business Law II (A). Prerequisite: BUS 375 or instructor's permission. Continues the concepts of BUS 375 with topics including but not limited to, sales, agency, business entities, securities regulations, secured transactions, bankruptcy, and negotiable instruments. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 378 Business, Government and Society (A). Prerequisites: Declared major or minor and BUS 375 and ENL 308. Investigates the of market and nonmarket business environments to develop the student's ability to critically analyze commercial, social, and ethical situations from the perspectives of different organizational shareholders. Topics include globalization, public policy, government regulation, consumer rights, corporate social respon- sibility, the environment and employment rights. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 389 Business Careers Seminar (A). Students should complete this seminar before their senior year. Helps students develop their own competitive profile and plan for post-graduation. Develops the students' understanding of the career resources available to them, career paths, and opportunities in business, and how to find and prepare for jobs and interviews. Internships and graduate school options are also discussed. Requires students to conform to a mandatory dress code of professional business attire. 1 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 415 Data Management (A). Prerequisite: BUS 317 or instructor's permission. Develops knowledge and skills with regard to issues of data management and database design. Focuses on data management issues of importance to business organizations including database administration, security, and privacy. Introduces emerging data management issues including data warehousing, data mining, and shared database access through a LAN or the Web. Continues to develop student skills with database software. 3 Cr. Fall

BUS 417 Systems Analysis and Design (A). Prerequisite: BUS 317 or CIS 304. Provides an in-depth examination of the processes, methods, and tools used to develop information systems. 3 Cr. Spring

BUS 418 Advanced Management Information Systems (A). Prerequisite: BUS 317 or CIS 304 and completion of ENL strongly advised. Addresses contemporary issues, methods, and applications reflecting emerging trends and technology in the field of Management Information Systems. Emphasizes knowledge and skills relevant to the contemporary workplace, including end-user and business applications. Utilizes relevant literature and instructional materials, analysis of cases and situations, and use of software packages as appropriate. Topics change over time so students should check with instructor prior to registration to confirm interest in subjects to be addressed. 3 Cr. Fall

BUS 420 Short-Term Financial Management (A). Prerequisite: BUS 325. A CTP® Associate course. Provides a comprehensive introduction to short-term financial management and working capital management, including cash management systems, management of corporate liquidity, receivables and payables management, banking and payments systems. Allows students who successfully complete the course with a grade of "B" or better to be currently eligible to take the Certified Treasury Professional® (CTP®) exam and acquire the CTP® designation. 3 Cr. Fall

BUS 421 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management (A). Prerequisite: BUS 325. Provides an introduction to modern investment theory and analysis. Covers the organization and functioning of securities markets, risk and return relationships, modern portfolio theory, asset pricing models, efficient markets and arbitrage concepts, stocks, bonds, options, futures, mutual funds, convertibles, and warrants. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 422 Corporate Financial Policy (A). Prerequisite: BUS 325. Provides in-depth coverage of corporate financial analysis and policy stressing agency theory, valuation, market efficiency, capital budgeting under conditions of certainty and uncertainty, capital structure, bankruptcy, underwriting, and dividend policy. Extensive analysis of real-world data, case studies, and spreadsheet analysis. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 428 Seminar in Finance (A). Prerequisites: ECN 304 and either BUS 421 or BUS 422. Addresses recent developments in the area of corporate financial policy and/or investment analysis. Includes a review of recent literature, analysis of cases and situations, and use of software packages as appropriate. Topics rotate, so students should check with instructor to confirm interest in the subjects to be addressed. 3 Cr.

BUS 431 Global Market Exporting (A). Gives students hand-on exposure to a wide variety of specific, business-related topics that must be considered when conducting business in other countries. Includes these topics: marketing, logistics, databases and other information sources, the internet, political and economic factors, legal considerations, banking and financial implications. Primarily a seminar format. 3 Cr.

BUS 432 Sales Management (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Treats the responsibilities and challenges of managing the sales function. Stresses analytical and interpersonal skills, including planning, organizing, directing, motivating, and controlling a sales organization. Examines legal and ethical issues. 3 Cr. Spring

BUS 433 International Marketing (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Examines and analyzes the similarities and differences among domestic and foreign markets. Includes in the analysis consumers, 4 Ps (product, price, place, promotion), uncontrollable variables, and implementation of the marketing concept in a foreign market. Also investigates the coordination and integration of a firm's national marketing program with its foreign marketing program. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 434 Direct Marketing (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Discusses one of the fastest growing marketing sectors. Covers database creation and management, direct mail, catalogs, telemarketing, and use of the media as stand-alones or integrated into a marketing mix. 3 Cr.

BUS 435 Consumer Behavior (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Explores how individual and group behavior affects marketing decisions, and how to market the right product/service to proper market segments. Relates behavior characteristics to product, price, place and promotion. 3 Cr. Fall

BUS 436 Marketing Research (A). Prerequisites: BUS 335 and ECN 304. Covers marketing information, proper techniques for problem identification, and use of research methodology and techniques to define problems, using primary and secondary data sources. 3 Cr. Spring

BUS 437 Integrated Marketing Communications (A). Prerequisites: BUS 435 and BUS 335. Provides an overview of promotional policies, the relationship between promotional policy and marketing process, and the promotional policy in the context of the behavioral sciences. Discusses how to evaluate and select the best form of communication for the potential customer. 3 Cr. Spring

BUS 438 Supply Chain Management (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Explores the management of resource transformations between raw material and end user, via value-added in manufacturing, marketing, or logistics. 3 Cr. Fall

BUS 439 Retail Management (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Covers basic marketing functions of merchandising, promotion, control, and organization as they relate to retail organizations. 3 Cr.

BUS 440 Business-to-Business Marketing (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335. Explores the marketing of goods and services to manufacturers, public entities, government agencies, and other private and public organizations for use in the production of goods and services. 3 Cr. Fall

BUS 441 Marketing Management (A). Prerequisite: BUS 335 and senior status. Provides an introduction to marketing problems as they relate to proprietary and public organizations, and decisions needed in product and service pricing, distribution and promotional strategy. Uses case analyses. 3 Cr. Spring

BUS 445 International Financial Management (A). Prerequisite: BUS 345 or instructor's permission. Covers the theories and practical aspects of international financial management. Includes topics such as international payments mechanisms, exchange market operations, arbitrage and hedging, spot and forward exchange, long-term international capital movements, international financial institutions, accounting, and taxation. 3 Cr. Fall

BUS 461 Production and Operations Management (A). Prerequisites: ECN 204; CIS 106 and one of MTH 201, MTH 221 or MTH 245. Completion of ENL 308 strongly advised. Focuses on issues and techniques associated with managing the day-to-day operations of the firm. Includes these topics: decision making, forecasting, project management, quality, inventory management, production planning, production methods, product design, location planning, facilities layout, scheduling, purchasing, and capacity planning. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 462 Quality Management Systems (A). Prerequisites: ECN 204 and BUS 345. Completion of ENL 308 strongly advised. Discusses and contrasts various organizational systems and behaviors that promote product and service quality. Investigates micro-level individual behaviors and macro-level organizational issues and policies that impact quality. Helps students understand how some management and organizational systems represent barriers to quality. Explores how approaches to quality differ across the international business community. Includes these topics: TQM, continuous improvement, process reengineering, benchmarking, statistical process control, and ISO standards. 3 Cr. Spring

BUS 463 Small Business Management (A). Prerequisite: BUS 317. Declared business major or minor only. For the prospective small business manager who needs the tools and techniques essential for starting, building and maintaining a successful enterprise. Includes topics helpful to the successful operation of the small business, especially finance, marketing, production, personnel, inventory control, purchasing, planning, cost control, computer systems and entrepreneurial leadership. 3 Cr. Fall

BUS 464 Electronic Commerce (A). Prerequisites: ENL 308 and BUS 317 or instructor's permission. Business majors must complete ENL 308 before enrolling. Explores issues, methods, and opportunities associated with electronic forms of business focusing on Web-based commerce. Topics include: business models, transaction processing, marketing issues, legal issues, security concepts and issues, hardware, software, technology, business planning, and management issues. Teaches students the various aspects of designing and running an Internet business. 3 Cr. Spring

BUS 465 Human Resource Management (A). Prerequisites: BUS 366 and ENL 308. Undertakes a broad survey of the human resources management issues faced by contemporary organizations. Topics include: human resource planning, recruitment, selection, orientation, training and development, performance management, compensation and benefits, employment law, unions, and collective bargaining. Students should take BUS 465 before enrolling in BUS 467 or 468. 3 Cr. Fall

BUS 467 Employment Law and Compliance (A). Prerequisite: BUS 375. It is recommended that students complete BUS 465 prior to taking this course. Examines the relationship between public policy and current human resource management practices. Places major emphasis on developing an understanding of the legal rights and responsibilities of employees and employers in the employment relationship. Considers the content, enforcement, interpretation, and day-to-day application of employment laws. 3 Cr.

BUS 468 Advanced Human Resource Topics (A). Prerequisite: BUS 465 or instructor's permission. Explores and further elaborates on key topics introduced in BUS 465. Topics include recruitment and selection, performance management and development, and compensation and benefits administration. Places particular emphasis on developing skills and knowledge necessary for entry-level positions in human resource management. 3 Cr. Spring

BUS 475 Strategic Management (A). Prerequisites: BUS 325, BUS 335, BUS 345, BUS 366, ENL 308, declared business or accounting major, and senior status. Capstone course that integrates material from earlier core courses and applies theories and models of strategic management to analyze real-world data, solve complex business problems, and analyze business case studies. Group-based research, analysis, and presentation are an integral part of this course. 3 Cr. Every Semester

BUS 490 Senior Thesis Research (A). Prerequisites: Minimum GPA 3.25, declared business major, completion of 18 upper-division business credits. Part of a two-semester course of study aimed at providing students an opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge in a specialized area. Allows students to select a faculty member willing to serve as their thesis advisor. Requires students to identify a research topic and conduct background research to include the preparation of an introduction and bibliography. Requires the data to be collected by the end of the semester. 3 Cr. By Arrangement

BUS 491 Senior Thesis (A). Prerequisite: BUS 490. Provides a continuation of BUS 490. Requires students to analyze collected data, explain the results and prepare conclusions. Requires the thesis to be in proper thesis format according to departmental procedures. 3 Cr. By Arrangement

BUS 498 Internship (A). Prerequisites: Junior or senior status, declared major in business administration (any concentration) or major in international business and economics. Students must have a minimum 2.75 GPA in the major and a minimum overall 2.5 GPA. Internship not open to intents to major. Open to declared majors in business administration or international business and economics with junior or senior standing. Students must have a 2.75 GPA in the major and an overall 2.5 GPA. This internship is not open to "Intents to Major." Provides supervised experience in a business environment. Required application forms are available through the department's internship coordinator or on the Web at: http://www.brockport.edu/bus-econ/career/students/interns_overview.htm. 1-6 Cr. By Arrangement

BUS 499 Independent Study in Business Administration (A). Entails special projects in business under the direction of individual staff members. Arranged in consultation with the instructor-sponsor and in accordance with the procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 1-6 Cr. By Arrangement

Economics Courses

ECN 100 Contemporary Economic Problems (A,S). Covers economic reasoning through the application of essential economic principles, basic principles underlying competing economic systems, and differences between macro- and micro-economic theory as applied to current issues confronting the American economic system. ECN 100 does not meet the requirements for any major in the department.

ECN 201 Principles of Economics - Micro (A). Prerequisite: MTH 121 or equivalent. Covers issues of scarcity and choice; determination of prices, demand and supply, production, cost, behavior of the firm, and the role of government. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ECN 202 Principles of Economics - Macro (A). Covers problems of the aggregate economy and the policies used to control those problems. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ECN 204 Introduction to Statistics (A). Prerequisite: MTH 121 or equivalent. Covers basic concepts of statistical analysis, including descriptive statistics, probability and expected value, sampling, and estimation. Note: Students who have received credit for BIO 431, MTH 243, PSH 202, PLS 300, SOC 200, or transfer credit for an elementary statistics course at another institution may waive ECN 204. Students will not receive credit for both ECN 204 and another elementary statistics course. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ECN 301 Intermediate Microeconomics (A). Prerequisites: ECN 201, ECN 202 and MTH 121. Covers the basic tools and techniques of microeconomic analysis, the theory of consumer behavior and demand, theory of the firm and market equilibria, and input markets. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ECN 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics (A). Prerequisites: ECN 201, ECN 202 and MTH 121. Covers the basic tools of macroeconomic analysis, including the determination of national income, employment and price levels, an analysis of macroeconomic stabilization policies, and economic growth. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ECN 304 Intermediate Statistics (A). Prerequisites: ECN 204 and MTH 121. Includes inferential statistics, index numbers, regression and correlation analysis, time series analysis, and chi-square tests. Emphasizes both the proper use and possible abuse of statistical methods in the context of business and economic applications. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ECN 305 Managerial Economics (A). Prerequisites: ECN 201, ECN 202 and MTH 121. Provides an introduction to the economic analysis of business decisions. Includes decision theory, demand theory, and the economic theory of production and costs. 3 Cr. Spring

ECN 321 Money and Banking (A). Prerequisites: ECN 201 and ECN 202. Covers the role of money in the modern economy, emphasizing the role of depository institutions, and the evolution of the central banking structure together with domestic and international monetary policy. 3 Cr. Fall

ECN 333 Health Economics (A). Prerequisite: ECN 201. Analyzes both narrow questions, such as the distribution, efficiency and equity of health delivery systems, and broader issues of the relation between public health and economic activity. 3 Cr.

ECN 361 Labor Market Analysis (A). Prerequisites: ECN 100 or ECN 201. Focuses on the issues and the analysis of labor markets. Includes wage determination and income distribution, skill structure of the work force, unionism and unemployment. 3 Cr. Fall

ECN 425 Financial Institutions (A). Prerequisite: ECN 302. Covers financial institutions, their operations, and the interrelationships among those that operate in the domestic and international money and capital markets, with emphasis on current problems and issues. 3 Cr. Spring

ECN 443 International Economics (A). Prerequisites: ECN 201 and ECN 202. Uses basic economic tools to study pure trade theory and interrelations between the domestic and the international economy. Examines the basis of trade; gains from trade; theory and practice of protection; nature, disturbance, and readjustment of the balance of payments; international monetary systems; internal and external balance; macroeconomic coordination; exchange rate variation; and other topics. 3 Cr. Spring

ECN 453 International Business Seminar (A). Prerequisites: ECN 201 and ECN 202. Addresses contemporary and emerging issues in international business, including strategic issues. 3 Cr. Fall

ECN 461 Human Resource Economics (A). Prerequisites: ECN 201 and ECN 202. Covers the development and utilization of labor as a productive resource. Has a policy emphasis. 3 Cr.

ECN 485 Economic Research (A). Prerequisites: ECN 304; ECN 302 and either ECN 305 or ECN 301. Emphasizes the skills of inquiry, analysis, and communication required of a professional economist. Helps students learn to find information, analyze it, and communicate the results of their analysis. 3 Cr.

ECN 490 Senior Thesis Research (A). Part of a two-semester course of study aimed at providing students with an opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge in a specialized area. Allows students to select a faculty member willing to serve as their thesis advisor. Requires students to identify a research topic, and conduct background research to include the preparation of an introduction and bibliography. The data should be collected by the end of the semester. 3 Cr. By Arrangement

ECN 498 Economics Internship (A). Provides supervised experience in a work environment, with an opportunity to apply concepts learned in economics course work. Provides an opportunity for students to better understand career opportunities in the field of economics, including careers related to economic development, economic planning, international trade, banking systems, and banking policy. Helps students understand the professional expectations of employers and the work culture. 1-6 Cr. Every Semester

ECN 499 Independent Study in Economics (A). Entails special projects in economics under direction of individual staff members. Arranged in consultation with the instructor-sponsor and in accordance with procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 1-6 Cr. By Arrangement

The information in this publication was current as of June 2005 when the text was compiled. Changes, including but not restricted to, tuition and fees, course descriptions, degree and program requirements, policies, and financial aid availability may have occurred since that time. Whether or not a specific course is scheduled for a given term is contingent on enrollment, budget and staffing. The college reserves the right to make any changes it finds necessary and may announce such changes for student notification in publications other than the College catalogs. For the purpose of degree and program completion, students are bound by the requirements in effect as stated in the printed catalog at the time of their matriculation at SUNY Brockport. Inquiries on the current status of requirements can be addressed to the appropriate College department of office. Also refer to the Brockport Web site home page at www.brockport.edu for current information.