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Graduate Studies Catalog 2007-2009

Department of Health Science

(585) 395-2643

Chairperson and Associate Professor: Douglas Scheidt, PhD, University of Buffalo; Associate Dean of Professions and Professor: Eileen L. Daniel, DEd, University of Oregon; Professor: Thomas Golaszewski, EdD, SUNY Buffalo; Associate Professors: Joseph E. Balog, PhD, University of Maryland; Linda F. Balog, PhD, University of Maryland; Priya Banerjee, PhD, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale; Gary J. Metz, MPA, SUNY Brockport; Celia Watt, PhD, University of Texas-Austin; Assistant Professors: Jennifer R. Boyle, PhD, University of Maryland; Patti A. Follansbee, PhD, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale; Gregg M. Kirchofer, PhD University of Toledo. Visiting Assistant Professor: Leonie C.R. Smith, MPH, Hunter College (PhD Candidate, Kent State University).

Degree Program

MSEd Health Education
The Department of Health Science offers the MSEd Health Education program for the preparation of professional health educators. Professional preparation for the field of health education focuses on skills for the promotion of health, and strategies for enhancing and encouraging change toward positive health behaviors. Students may pursue one of the following options:

  1. Community Health Education
    The MSEd offers opportunities for advanced study related to the planning, implementation and evaluation of health-education programs in a variety of community settings, including public health departments, voluntary health associations, medical and mental-health care organizations, work-site settings and health advocacy organizations. Completion of this degree prepares the candidate to be eligible to become credentialed as a Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES), as set forth by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing.
  2. New York State Professional Certification to Teach Health (K-12)
    The MSEd also meets the academic requirements established by the New York State Department of Education for professional certification as a health teacher.
  3. Background
    In New York state, the field of teacher education is in the midst of an era of unprecedented change. Effective February 2, 2004, the educational requirements for teaching certifications changed, as did the certificate titles themselves.

    What was called a provisional certificate is now titled an initial certificate. Similarly, what was called a permanent certificate is now titled a professional certificate. Please note that initial certification is the first certification level that prospective teachers earn under the revised 2004 New York state certification requirements; professional certification is the final required certification.

    Programs leading to certification are subject to New York State Department of Education revision. Please contact the graduate coordinator for the latest information on these programs.

    For those with initial certification in health education
    The 36-credit program can be completed within 15 months by a student attending full-time or completed over longer periods of time for part-time students. This program satisfies the New York State Department of Education requirements for professional certification as a health teacher.

    For those with initial certification in another content area
    Additional health content courses beyond the 36-credit core curriculum may be required to satisfy New York State Department of Education requirements for professional certification as a health teacher.

    For those not possessing certification to teach
    In addition to student teaching (nine credits), this alternate program may require a field experience, and additional health content courses beyond the 36-hour core curriculum to satisfy New York State Department Education requirements for professional certification as a health teacher.

Admission Requirements
Applications packets are available through the Office of Graduate Admissions at (585) 395-5465 or via e-mail to gradadmit@brockport.edu. All applicants for the master of science in education (health education) program must have completed a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university (see the Graduate Admissions section in this catalog for further details). All applicants will be evaluated on an individual basis to determine the course requirements for their program. Academic standards for acceptance into the program include the following:

  1. An undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0; (An applicant with an undergraduate GPA of less than 3.0 may present his/her written rationale for acceptance in the application materials.)
  2. Three (3) satisfactory letters of recommendation. The letters should comment on the ­applicant’s:
    1. competence in professional work performance;
    2. academic performance in college;
    3. ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing; and
    4. ability to relate effectively with colleagues, students, clients, superior and subordinate personnel, and the general public.
  3. Performance on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test including writing competency examination.
  4. Evidence of having successfully completed (“C” or better) at least two semesters of anatomy and physiology (or equivalent course) and one semester of statistics at the undergraduate level.

Note: Courses completed prior to matriculation may or may not be approved for subsequent inclusion in a successful applicant’s Plan of Study, at the discretion of the department. No more than six credits taken before matriculation will be applied to a graduate student’s degree ­program.

Applications, official transcripts from all colleges attended, GRE scores and three recommendations should be submitted to the College’s Office of Graduate Admissions. Contact the Office of Graduate Admissions for further information, or visit www.brockport.edu/graduate for details on the application deadlines for this program.

The decision to recommend acceptance or rejection of an application lies wholly within the department’s jurisdiction. The Department of Health Science has a professional responsibility to deny admission or continuation in any of its graduate programs to any applicant/student whose level of performance and/or personal characteristics or dispositions do not adequately meet academic, professional or ethical standards.

Program Requirements and Curriculum
To earn a graduate degree at SUNY Brockport, students must complete all degree requirements with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. Students in the MSEd Health Science program must earn a “B–” or better in all core courses (HLS 600, 602, 640, 641, 645, 684 and 686). In other courses, a minimum grade of “C+” is required. Students whose GPA falls below a 3.0, or who are deemed as not making reasonable progress toward the degree, will be academically dismissed from the program by the department.

Criteria determining “not making reasonable progress:”

  1. Failure to earn at least one credit during the previous 12 months and not receiving a written leave of absence approval from the department; or
  2. Maintaining an incomplete grade beyond the contracted time period (which may include a written extension of the incomplete grade); or
  3. Not completing the program in the allotted five years from the date of matriculation ­(unless granted an extension by the Office of Graduate Studies upon petition from the advisor or based on an approved leave of absence); or
  4. Failure to maintain continuous enrollment once beginning work on the major paper or thesis, by registering for at least one credit in HLS 698 or HLS 700 each fall and spring semester until the project is completed and approved.
  5. For Alternate MSEd applicants only, students must have passed the Liberal Arts and Sciences Test (LAST) of the New York State Teacher Certification Examination (NYSTCE) with a score accepted by the New York State Department of Education prior to HLS 586 Field Experience placement.

Master of Science in Education (Health Education)

Required core courses: Credits
HLS 600 Issues in Health and Wellness 3
HLS 602 Principles and Philosophy of Health Education 3
HLS 640 Program Planning and Educational Strategies 3
HLS 641 Health Education Organization in the School and Community 3
HLS 645 Applied Strategies in Health Education 3
HLS 684 Measurement for Health Education Evaluation 3
HLS 686 Seminar in Research Design 3
HLS 698 Major Paper 3
or
HLS 700 Thesis 6
Graduate Electives by Advisement 9–12*
Total: 36**

*Students choosing HLS 698 Major Paper must complete 12 credits of electives subject to approval by their advisor. Students choosing HLS 700 Thesis must complete nine credits of electives subject to approval by their advisor.
**Students who are pursuing certification and have their initial certification in another content area may be required to complete additional health content course work. Students who are pursuing professional certification and do not possess any certification will be required to complete student teaching (nine credits), and may be required to complete a field experience and additional health content courses beyond the 36-hour core curriculum.

15-Month Plan
This 36-hour program can be completed by a student who maintains full-time enrollment. This program is an appropriate choice for students who (1) have initial certification in health education and wish to pursue professional certification; or (2) wish to work in community health settings including public health departments, voluntary health associations, medical organizations, work-site settings and health advocacy organizations.

Summer Fall Spring Summer
Elective* HLS 602 HLS 600 HLS 698
Elective* HLS 640 HLS 645
Elective* HLS 684 HLS 641
Elective* HLS 686

*Students should consult with their academic advisor to determine appropriate elective choices; some electives may be offered on a fall-only or spring-only basis and during Summer and Winter Sessions.

Electives in Alcohol and Substance Abuse Studies
The Department of Health Science offers a set of electives in alcohol and substance abuse studies. These electives may be pursued by non-degree status (non-matriculated) graduate students (such as students seeking to obtain or maintain a Credentialed Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Counselor status with New York state), as well as by matriculated students working towards their MSEd who may use some of these electives for the nine to 12 credits of electives in consultation with their advisor. MSEd students who would like to complete the concentration in alcohol and substance abuse studies, designed to partially fulfill the requirements to sit for the New York State CASAC examinations, would need to take HLS 509 or 518, 521, 522, 523, 535, 545, 597, and 598, in addition to the MSEd core courses.

Alcohol/Substance Abuse Studies (specialization, non-degree) Credits
HLS 509 Introduction to Alcohol and Other Drugs* 3
OR
HLS 518 Alcohol Use and Abuse*
HLS 521 Group Counseling for Alcohol and Other Drugs 3
HLS 522 Individual Treatment Planning for Alcohol and Other Drugs 3
HLS 523 Theories on Alcohol and Other Drugs 3
HLS 524 Counseling Diverse Populations for Alcohol and Other Drugs 3
HLS 535 Evaluation and Assessment of Alcohol and Other Drugs 3
HLS 545 Psychopharmacology of Alcohol and Other Drugs 3
HLS 597 Internship Seminar for Alcohol and Other Drugs** 3
HLS 598 Internship for Alcohol and Other Drugs 6–12
Total: 30–36

*HLS 509 or HLS 518 is a prerequisite or corequisite for all other courses in this specialization.
**To be taken concurrently with HLS 598.

HEALTH SCIENCE COURSES

HLS 502 Women’s Health (A). Cross-listed as WMS 502. Studies women as healthy functioning human beings. Includes lectures and discussion with guest speakers to present positive information and insights on anatomical, physiological, mental, spiritual and emotional aspects of today’s woman. 3 Cr.

HLS 509 Introduction to Alcohol and Other Drugs (A). Introduces students to a variety of drug problems, including alcohol and tobacco, in contemporary society. Analyzes the diverse determinants (e.g., pharmacological, behavioral, social, economic, historic) of these problems. Discusses effective substance abuse prevention and treatment strategies. 3 Cr. HLS 518 Alcohol Use and Abuse (A

HLS 518 Alcohol Use and Abuse (A). Examines patterns and symptomatology of alcohol use and abuse, the Medical Model/Disease Concept of Alcoholism, the DSM III-R criteria for alcohol abuse and dependency, and other various models of alcohol use. Explores theories of co dependency, treatment modalities, and evaluation methodologies for clinical and educational interventions. Also examines the significance of alcohol and other drugs as they impact the criminal justice, traffic safety, employee wellness and adolescent health care systems. 3 Cr.

HLS 519 Human Sexuality (A). Cross-listed as WMS 519. Provides each student with the opportunity to gain an awareness of him/herself and others as sexual beings. Examines sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors throughout the various life stages, in order to integrate human sexuality into one’s total health and well-being. 3 Cr. Every Semester

HLS 521 Group Counseling for Alcohol and Other Drugs (B). Prerequisite or corequisite: HLS 509 or HLS 518. Introduces students to the basic foundations of group dynamics and group therapy in alcoholism counseling. Addresses the historical development of the group process movement in addition to stages of group therapy, techniques of group therapy, curative aspects of the group process, interpersonal learning and problems associated with group process. 3 Cr.

HLS 522 Individualized Treatment Planning for Alcohol and Other Drugs (B). Prerequisite or corequisite: either HLS 518 or HLS 509 (may be taken concurrently). Introduces students to the elements of individualized treatment planning. Covers client goal formulation in addition to writing attainable client objectives and evaluation of these objectives. Also examines the biopsychosocial-spiritual aspects of the individualized treatment plan and client case management. 3 Cr.

HLS 523 Theories of Alcohol and Other Drugs (A). Prerequisites or corequisites: HLS 518 or HLS 509. Reviews major contemporary theories on alcoholism and other addictions (disease model, psychoanalytic formulations, conditioning models, social learning analyses, family systems perspectives, socio-cultural viewpoints, transtheoretical model [stages of change] and harm reduction). Critically evaluates the concepts and research generated from each perspective. Analyzes the usefulness of each theory in the practice of substance abuse prevention and counseling. 3 Cr.

HLS 524 Counseling Diverse Populations for Alcohol and Other Drugs (A). Prerequisites or corequisites: HLS 518 or HLS 509 (may be taken concurrently). Prepares students for working in a counseling setting with alcohol/substance abusers having multiple emotional and developmental disabilities, criminal justice clients and individuals from diverse population groups, including Native Americans, Latinos, people of color, women and gays/lesbians. 3 Cr.

HLS 525 Women and Safety (A). Cross-listed as WMS 525. Examines issues of violent crime and personal victimization, especially for women, and the implications for personal crime prevention. Includes an in-depth examination of these violent crimes (e.g., sexual assault, relationship violence), followed by a focus on individual strategies for maintaining personal safety and reducing crime risks. Considers crime prevention for children and other special populations. 3 Cr.

HLS 526 HIV/AIDS: Issues and Implications (A). Examines HIV/AIDS issues and implications facing the United States and the world today: understanding the disease, its perceived causes, pathways for transmissions and prevention strategies. Also examines educational strategies for schools and community agencies. 3 Cr.

HLS 528 Substance Abuse and the Criminal Justice System (A). Introduces criminal justice students to the impact of alcohol and illicit substances on the criminal justice system. Discusses drug identification, administration, psycho-pharmacology theories of alcohol and substance abuse, and investigation techniques. Addresses the role of alcohol and substance abuse in the criminal justice system and law enforcement community. 3 Cr.

HLS 535 Evaluation and Assessment of Alcohol and Other Drugs (B). Prerequisites or corequisites: HLS 518 or HLS 509 (may be taken concurrently). Examines theory and methodology of measurement, assessment and evaluation in alcohol and substance abuse and dependence. Studies the more widely researched and utilized methods of assessment: clinical interviews, structured interviews and standardized instruments. Reviews instruments used in screening, diagnosis, treatment planning and neuropsychological evaluation. Also covers documentation, report writing and the ethics of assessment. Involves extensive use of clinical materials to illustrate the uses and limitations of various techniques. 3 Cr.

HLS 545 Psychopharmacology of Alcohol and Other Drugs (A). Prerequisites or corequisites: HLS 518 or HLS 509 (may be taken concurrently). Cross-listed as PSH 545. Studies the effects of alcohol, sedatives, stimulants, opiates, hallucinogens and other drugs, especially on the central nervous system, behavior and mood. Relates the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to intoxication, tolerance, withdrawal, abuse and dependence of each drug. Also explores the learning and motivational components of drug tolerance and addiction. 3 Cr.

HLS 570 Health Implications of Stress (A). Involves comprehensive study of research, theory and empirical knowledge of the psychosomatic implications of stress on health and disease. Examines the nature of stress, the effects of stress on the human organism, including an examination of physiological, psychological and behavioral symptoms and changes. Investigates causes of stress during various stages of life, as well as occupational and family sources of stress. Studies and allows for the practice of behavioral interventions and specific techniques. 3 Cr.

HLS 571 Childhood and Adolescent Stress (A). Provides an overview of stress and its effects on children and adolescents in today’s society; and the nature, symptoms and causes of stress in children and adolescents. Explores positive and negative ways children and adolescents manage stress; useful techniques for controlling and reducing stress in a healthful manner; and how parents, teachers and health professionals can help young people manage stress. 3 Cr.

HLS 575 Computer Applications in Health Education (A). Provides students with an introduction to the potential issues of microcomputers in health education. Covers a range of hardware and examines general and specific software applications of microcomputer technology to the practice of health education. Explores important social, educational, legal and ethical issues related to the use of technology in health education. 3 Cr. Every Semester

HLS 586 Field Experience (A). Prerequisites: All 600-level core courses completed and program coordinator’s approval. Provides a field experience in a school site requiring a minimum of two days per week for each six-week placement. Includes planning, teaching and evaluation of health education plus other complementary responsibilities at each school setting. 3 Cr. Fall

HLS 590 Selected Topics in Health Science (A). To be defined by the instructor in accordance with a specific topic to be covered that semester. May be repeated under another topic area. 1-6 Cr.

HLS 595 Practicum School Health Education (B). Prerequisites: All HLS core courses, completed electives and departmental approval. Enables students to plan, teach and evaluate their effectiveness in utilizing eight methodologies of school health education; determine student needs and engage in student-teacher planning; and apply health education knowledge and skills to promote health services. Requires students to teach at elementary and secondary levels. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading). 9 Cr. Spring

HLS 597 Internship Seminar for Alcohol and Other Drugs (A). Course fee. Prerequisites: either HLS 509 or HLS 518; HLS 521; HLS 522; HLS 523; HLS 524; HLS 535, HLS 545 and instructor’s permission. Designed to be taken concurrently with HLS 598. Allows students to process their experience in the field in a clinical group supervision format. Addresses issues which present themselves within the internship setting, including situations with clients, peers and supervisors. Covers ethics, confidentiality and diversity issues. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading). 3 Cr.

HLS 598 Internship for Alcohol and Other Drugs (B). Course fee. Prerequisites: either HLS 509 or HLS 518; HLS 521; HLS 522; HLS 523; HLS 524; HLS 535, HLS 545 and program coordinator’s permission. Enables students to apply their knowledge from course work in a variety of treatment settings with people in varying stages of alcohol and substance abuse and dependence. Allows students to gain experience in assessment, evaluation, treatment planning, referrals, counseling, therapeutic treatment and making referrals. Examines professional ethics in the practice setting. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading). 1-12 Cr.

HLS 599 Independent Study in Health Science (A). Permits students to pursue in greater depth topics studied previously in conventional graduate-level courses. Designed individually through consultation between student and instructor to suit the student’s needs and interests and the special competence of the instructor. May involve additional requirements established by the department. May be repeated with advisor’s approval. 1-6 Cr.

HLS 600 Issues in Health and Wellness (A). Explores current research, theory and knowledge of the relationship between lifestyle and wellness, individual responsibility and wellness, and disease prevention and health behaviors. Identifies and analyzes current critical health and wellness issues in the US. 3 Cr. Spring

HLS 602 Principles and Philosophy of Health Education (A). Explores and analyzes various views of health, disease, illness and health education. Considers alternative concepts of health and their implications for directions in health education. Examines contemporary and important bioethical issues that confront health educators and impact on the role of health education, including the biotechnological and health policy issues. 3 Cr. Fall

HLS 604 Mind Body Relationships in Health (A). Takes a practical, scientific approach to problems of interrelatedness of mental, emotional and physical aspects of health. Relates and applies facts from fields of anatomy, physiology and psychology as a basis for realizing ideas of optimum health, both in teaching and in personal life. 3 Cr.

HLS 640 Program Planning and Educational Strategies (B). Prerequisites or corequisites: HLS 600 and HLS 602. Examines the process of program planning for the field of health education. Presents a comprehensive framework of how to apply fundamental planning and health-education principles for promoting health and preventing disease in community and school settings. Includes analysis, development and application of health-education strategies designed to affect health behaviors in school and community settings. 3 Cr.

HLS 641 Health Education Organization in School and Community (A). Examines the school and community organizational context within which health education flourishes. Gives attention to the identification of the existing school and community health resource network associated with the delivery of health-education services, and allows students to develop specific proposals for establishing an effective school and community partnership for health promotion and the prevention of disease, disability and premature death. 3 Cr. Spring

HLS 645 Applied Education Strategies in Health Education (B). Prerequisites: HLS 600, HLS 602 and HLS 640. Provides an application of educational theory related to health behavior. Emphasizes the use of theoretical frameworks in developing group or individual instructional methodologies to affect psychosocial variables which effect health behavior. Also emphasizes the implementation of health education programs in school and community settings. 3 Cr.

HLS 684 Statistics Measurement for Health Education Evaluation (B). Provides students with fundamental statistical, evaluation and research methods that are used in health education to measure health knowledge, attitudes, skills and behaviors. Covers traditional descriptive and inferential techniques used in health education research and evaluation. Uses microcomputer software packages to provide students with computer skills for statistical analyses. 3 Cr.

HLS 686 Seminar in Research Design (A). Prerequisite: HLS 684. Covers the review, appraisal, analysis and design of common research procedures; applications of statistical procedures, library methods, evaluation procedures and experimental methods; and preparation for the development of proposals for a thesis or a major paper. 3 Cr. HLS 693 Internship and Seminar i

HLS 693 Internship and Seminar in Community Health (A). Prerequisite: Internship

HLS 698 Major Paper in Health Education (A). Prerequisites: Advisor’s permission and a graduate GPA of 3.0. Written usually after completion of most, if not all, classroom courses. Achieves integration of concepts, methods and information relative to a specific topic or issue in health education. Focuses on problems, theory or practice. May reflect library research, field study, curricula development or program evaluation. Students will register for a minimum one credit every semester once they begin to work with their advisor on the paper. HLS 698 may be repeated, but only three credits may be used toward the credits required for graduation. Students must maintain continuous registration (fall and spring semesters) from the first semester that they begin working on their proposal until their major paper is completed and accepted. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading). 1-3 Cr.

HLS 699 Independent Study in Health Science (A). Permits students to pursue in greater depth topics studied previously in conventional graduate-level courses. Designed individually through consultation between student and instructor to suit the student’s needs and interests and the special competence of the instructor. May involve additional requirements established by the department. 1-6 Cr.

HLS 700 Thesis (A). Prerequisite: Advisor’s permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0. Entails individual investigation, preparation and oral defense of a substantial research project in health science. Done in tutorial consultation with a graduate faculty member. Students will register for a minimum one credit every semester once they begin to work with their advisor on the thesis. HLS 700 may be repeated, but only six credits may be used toward the credits required for graduation. Students must maintain continuous registration (fall and spring semesters) from the first semester that they begin working on their proposal until their thesis is completed, defended and accepted. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading). 1-6 Cr.

The information in this publication was current as of Summer 2007 when the text was compiled. Changes, including but not restricted to, tuition and fees, course descriptions, degree and program requirements, policies, and financial aid eligibility may have occurred since that time. Whether or not a specific course is scheduled for a given term is contingent on enrollment, budget support and staffing. The College reserves the right to make any changes it finds necessary and may announce such changes for student notification in publications other than the College catalogs. For the purposes of degree and program completion, students are bound by the requirements in effect as stated in the printed catalog at the time of their matriculation at SUNY Brockport. Students matriculated in summer are bound by the catalog in effect the following fall semester. Inquiries on the current status of requirements can be addressed to the appropriate College department or office. Also refer to the Brockport Web site home page at www.brockport.edu for current information. Printed Summer 2007

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