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Undergraduate Studies Catalog 2007-2009

Environmental Science and Biology

105 Lennon Hall
(585) 395-5975
E-mail: jhaynes@brockport.edu

Chair and Professor: James M. Haynes, PhD, University of Minnesota; Distinguished Service Professor: Joseph C. Makarewicz, PhD, Cornell University; Professor: Christopher J. Norment, PhD, University of Kansas; Assistant Professors: Mark D. Norris, PhD, University of Minnesota; Jacques Rinchard, PhD, Universitaires Notre Dame de la Paix Namur; Instructional Support Associate: Hilary L. Richardson; Environmental Science Program Faculty: Whitney J. Autin, Associate Professor of Earth Sciences, PhD, Louisiana State University; Mark R. Noll, Associate Professor of Earth Sciences, PhD, University of Delaware; Paul L. Richards, Assistant Professor of Earth Sciences, PhD, Pennsylvania State University; James A. Zollweg, Associate Professor of Earth Sciences, PhD, Cornell University; Mark P. Heitz, Associate Professor of Chemistry, PhD, SUNY Buffalo; Markus M. Hoffmann, Associate Professor of Chemistry, PhD, Washington University; Adjunct Faculty: David H. Kosowski (NYDEC retired); Theodore W. Lewis (Research Associate); Charles R. O’Neill (New York Sea Grant;) Gary N. Neuderfer (NYDEC retired); Norma A. Polizzi (JD).

Environmental problems are among the most urgent issues facing our civilization. In order to manage Earth’s environment well, we must understand the processes that shape its surface; control the chemistry of the air, water and soil; and produce and maintain the biological and other resources upon which humans depend. We must also understand the interactions of animals, plants and other living organisms with their physical and chemical environments or their ecology. Through a curriculum with a common core and a focused track, environmental science majors develop conceptual knowledge and technical skills to use the disciplines of biology, ecology, chemistry and the earth sciences to understand and solve environmental problems. Four concentrations are offered in the environmental science major: aquatic ecology/biology, terrestrial ecology/biology, environmental chemistry, and the earth sciences. After declaring a major in environmental science with the department secretary in 105 Lennon Hall, (585) 395-5975, a faculty advisor in the selected track will be assigned.

Minors in environmental science and in environmental studies are offered for non-majors. Contact the department secretary in 105 Lennon Hall, (585)395-5975, for information and for an appointment with the department Chair to set up an individual course of study.

Students majoring in environmental science can achieve New York State Teacher Certification to teach biology, chemistry or earth science. After making the decision to pursue certification, see your advisor in the Department of Environmental Science and Biology immediately.

Major Requirements

The major requires a minimum of 62-73 credits balanced between required courses in the core curriculum (38 credits) and required, elective, or co-requisite courses in the area of concentration (24-36 credits).

Courses (required of all majors)
Fall Semester Courses
Credits
ENV 202 Environmental Science
4
ENV 452 Environmental Laws and Regulations
3
CHM 205 College Chemistry I
4
GEL 201 Physical Geology
4
MTH 201 Calculus I
4
Spring Semester Courses
Credits
ENV 202 Environmental Science
4
ENV 204 Biology of Organisms
4
ENV 303 Ecology
4
ENV 452 Environmental Laws and Regulations
3
ENV 492 Global Environmental Issues
3
CHM 206 College Chemistry II
4
CHM 303 Analytical Chemistry
4
MTH 201 Calculus I
4



Concentrations (Required or elective courses)
Credits
Corequisite
  Aquatic Ecology/Biology
20
4
  Terrestrial Ecology/Biology
20
4
  Environmental Chemistry
21
14
  Earth Sciences
20
4
   
________
________
  Total Concentration Credits:
20-21
4-14




Concentration in Aquatic Ecology/Biology

Fall Semester
Credits
ENV 419 Limnology (required)
3
ENV 421 Limnology Laboratory (required)
2
ENV 319 Biological Oceanography
3
ENV 437 Biostatistics
3
ENV 439 Conservation Biology
3
ENV 464 Aquaculture I
4
ENV 474 Aquaculture II
4
ENV 476 Animal Ecophysiology
3
ENV 490 Fishery Techniques and Fish Identification
2
ENV 498 Collaborative Research
1-3
ESC 425 Wetland Systems
3
ESC 412 Hydrology
4
Spring Semester
Credits
ENV 423 Pollution Biology
3
ENV 436 Water Quality Analysis
4
ENV 462 Aquatic Toxicology
4
ENV 483 Aquatic Invertebrates
4
ENV 484 Fish Ecology
3
ENV 488 Environmental Impact Analysis (summer only)
4-6
ENV 498 Collaborative Research
1-3
GEL 462 Groundwater
4
   
Co-requisite course:
CHM 305 Organic Chemistry I
4




Concentration in Terrestrial Ecology

Fall Semester
Credits
ENV 400 Plant Diversity
4
ENV 405 Plant Ecology
4
ENV 406 Wildlife Ecology
4
ENV 437 Biostatistics
3
ENV 439 Conservation Biology
3
ENV 459 Mammalogy
4
ENV 476 Animal Ecophysiology
3
ENV 498 Collaborative Research
1-3
ENV 325 Wetland Systems
3
ESC 455 Soils Science
4
Spring Semester
Credits
ENV 423 Pollution Biology
3
ENV 430 Ornithology
4
ENV 440 Herpetology
4
ENV 444 Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology
3
ENV 477 Field Biology (summer only)
4
ENV 488 Environmental Impact Analysis (summer only)
4-6
ENV 498 Collaborative Research
1-3
ESC 313 Environmental Climatology
3
ESC 431 Environmental Applications of Geographic Information Systems
3
   
Co-requisite course:
CHM 305 Organic Chemistry I
4




Concentration in Environmental Chemistry

Required Courses
Fall Semester
Credits
CHM 301 Chemical Safety
1
CHM 305 Organic Chemistry I
4
CHM 400 Chemistry Seminar
1
CHM 405 Physical Chemistry I
3
Spring Semester
Credits
CHM 306 Organic Chemistry II
4
CHM 401 Chemistry Seminar
1
CHM 406 Physical Chemistry II
3
CHM 457 Geochemistry
4

Elective courses (one required):
ENV 436 Water Quality Analysis
4
ENV 488 Environmental Impact Analysis (summer only)
4-6
ENV 498 Collaborative Research
1-3
CHM 408 Physical Chemistry Lab I
1
CHM 409 Physical Chemistry Lab II
1
Corequisite courses (all required):
MTH 202 Calculus II
3
MTH 203 Calculus III
3
PHS 201 College Physics I
4
PHS 202 College Physics II
4



Concentration in Earth Sciences

Fall Semester
Credits
ENV 419 Limnology
3
ENV 421 Limnology Laboratory
2
ENV 498 Collaborative Research
1-3
ESC 325 Wetland Systems
3
ESC 350 Computational Methods
3
ESC 412 Hydrology
4
ESC 455 Soils Science
3
ESC 464 Environmental Internship
1-3
GEL 415 Geomorphology
4
Spring Semester
Credits
ENV 436 Water Quality Analysis
4
ENV 488 Environmental Impact Analysis (summer only)
4-6
ENV 498 Collaborative Research
1-3
ESC 313 Environmental Climatology
3
ESC 314 Climate Laboratory
1
ESC 350 Computational Methods
3
ESC 418 Watershed Sciences
3
ESC 421 Air Pollution Meteorology
3
ESC 420 Atmospheric Sensing Methods
3
ESC 431 Environmental Applications of Geographic Information Systems
4
GEL 457 Geochemistry
3
GEL 462 Groundwater
3
   
Corequisite course (choose one):
PHS 115 General Physics with lab
4
PHS 201 College Physics with lab
4
CHM 305 Organic Chemistry I
4


Environmental Minors-Environmental Science/Environmental Studies

The environmental science minor (18 credits) prepares students for postgraduate education or employment in environmentally related fields. To ensure maximum breadth and depth of training, the schedule of elective courses for the minor in environmental science must be in disciplines other than the student’s own major and be formally developed with the department Chair.

Required courses:
Credits
ENV 202 Environmental Science
4
ENV 303 Ecology
4
ENV 452 Environmental Laws and Regulations
3
300 and 400-level electives by advisement (7 credits minimum)*
*Biological sciences majors are required to take CHM 303 Analytical Chemistry as one elective course.

The environmental studies minor (18 credits) offers students a variety of scientific, social, economic, political, and literary perspectives on environmental issues. Gaining these perspectives will help students become environmentally literate citizens and employees.

Required courses:
Credits
ENV 202 Environmental Science
4
ENV 303 Ecology
4
ENV 452 Environmental Laws and Regulations
3
   
Elective courses by advisement (7 credits minimum):
ANT 316 Food and Culture
3
ANT 330 World Poverty and Underdevelopment
3
CHM 372 Environmental Issues
3
ENV 469 American Environmental Literature
3
ESC 364 Water Resource Issues
3
HLS 303 Environmental Health
3
GEL 362 Energy and Mineral Resources Issues
3
HST 302 History of Science and Technology in America
3
HST 407 American Environmental History
3
PLS 338 Global Issues
3
SOC 306 Development and Globalization
3

Environmental Science and Biology Courses

ENV 201 Environmental Science (A,N). Non-majors only. Environmental science is an interdisciplinary field combining ideas and information from the natural and social sciences. The eight integrated themes of lecture and discussion are biodiversity, sustainability, connections in nature, pollution and its prevention, population growth, energy consumption and efficiency, solutions to environmental problems, and the importance of individuals changing their lifestyles and working with others to bring about environmental change. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENV 202 Environmental Science (A,L). Required for majors. Open to non-majors. Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary field combining ideas and information from the natural and social sciences. The eight integrated themes of lecture and discussion are biodiversity, sustainability, connections in nature, pollution and its prevention, population growth, energy consumption and efficiency, solutions to environmental problems, and the importance of individuals changing their lifestyles and working with others to bring about environmental change. Laboratory and field activities emphasize hands-on applications of environmental science methods, problem solving, and proper writing of laboratory reports. 4 Cr. Every Semester

ENV 203 Biology of Organisms (A,N). Non-majors only. Explores basic concepts in the biological sciences from a whole organism (animals and plants) and environmental science perspective. The unifying theme for the course is evolution, and T. H. Dobzhansky’s dictum that “Nothing in biology is understandable except in the light of evolution.” Topics include the scientific method, molecular and population genetics, fundamentals of cell biology, diversity of life, and evolution and natural selection. 3 Cr. Spring

ENV 204 Biology of Organisms (A,L). Required for majors. Open to non-majors. Explores basic concepts in the biological sciences from a whole organism (animals and plants) and environmental science perspective. The unifying theme for the course is evolution, and T. H. Dobzhansky’s dictum that “Nothing in biology is understandable except in the light of evolution.” Topics covered in lectures and laboratories include scientific method, molecular and population genetics, cell biology, diversity of life, and evolution and natural selection. 4 Cr. Spring

ENV 303 Ecology (A). Cross-listed as BIO 303. Prerequisites: ENV 111 or ENV 202. Ecology addresses interrelationships among organisms and the physical environment. Considers energy flow, nutrient cycling, population and community dynamics, principles of animal behavior, and natural history in lecture, laboratory and field studies. 4 Cr. Spring

ENV 319 Biological Oceanography (A). Cross-listed as ESC 319. Review of the oceans’ physical, geological and chemical properties followed by study of the classification, biology and life history of marine animals and plants. Concludes with ecology of selected marine ecosystems such as intertidal, deep sea and coral reef. 3 Cr.

ENV 400 Plant Diversity (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the diversity of plants from an evolutionary perspective to taxonomic and botanical characteristics. Laboratory and field work surveys plant structures and principles of plant classifications and identification from the cellular to organismal level. Projects include plant collection and preservation, plant propagation, plant reproduction, and review and presentation of botanical literature. 4 Cr. Even Fall

ENV 405 Plant Ecology (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the relationships between plants and the environment including physiological ecology and describing the plant environment; population ecology and interactions between plants and other organisms; and community ecology including plant diversity and temporal dynamics. Field exercises explore local plant communities using experimental and quantitative techniques. Students analyze and discuss current readings in plant ecology. 4 Cr. Odd Fall

ENV 406 Wildlife Ecology (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the scientific study of wildlife biology. Lecture topics include population ecology, behavior, nutrition, disease, habitat management, predator prey systems, economics, and the human dimensions of wildlife management. Laboratories and field work include radio telemetry, census methods, aging white-tailed deer, and computer modeling. 4 Cr. Even Fall

ENV 413 Topics in Plant Biology (A). Students with a substantial background in plant biology or ecology review recent scientific literature while addressing selected topics in plant biology, ecology or systematics. 3 Cr.

ENV 419 Limnology (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduces students to the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of lakes and streams. Topics include top-down: bottom-up control of food webs, eutrophication, nutrient cycling, acid precipitation effects on lakes, paleolimnology, etc. Recommended for students interested in oceanography and marine biology. Required for students in the aquatic ecology track of the environmental science major. ENV 421 is the complementary laboratory. 3 Cr. Fall

ENV 421 Limnology Laboratory (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduces students to the laboratory and field methods of limnology. Topics include sampling and identification of selected aquatic organisms, chemical analysis of water, and operation of physical and chemical sampling gear. Includes field exercises on lakes, using department vessels, and streams. Recommended for students interested in oceanography and marine biology. Required for students in the aquatic ecology track of the environmental science major. ENV 419 is the complementary lecture course. 2 Cr. Fall

ENV 423 Biology of Pollution (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the chemistry and biology of pollution. Primary focus on water pollution problems and effects of pollutants on organisms at the molecular, cellular, physiological and behavioral levels, plus effects on populations, communities and ecosystems. Overview of toxicity testing techniques and data analysis. 3 Cr. Odd Spring

ENV 427 Animal Behavior (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the science of animal behavior. Explores the behavior of animals in relation to adaptions and phylogenetic history. Topics include methods of studying behavior, the effects of genes and environment on behavior, relationships between neural and endocrine function and behavior, foraging strategies, mating strategies and systems, and social systems. 3 Cr. Even Fall

ENV 430 Ornithology (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the scientific study of birds. Explores their form, function, ecology, and evolution. Topics include anatomy, physiology, origins and biophysics of flight, migration and annual cycle, mating systems, and population and community ecology of birds. Includes lab and field study of anatomy and flight, identification techniques, census methods, and trapping and banding. 4 Cr. Even Spring

ENV 436 Water Quality Analysis (A). Prerequisite: CHM 206. Introduces standard methods and analytical techniques associated with environmental chemistry. Students gain experience, including set up and trouble shooting, with UV-V spectrophotometry, wet chemical techniques by autoanlyser, fluorometry, gas chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry, by analyzing unknowns. Although the medium for analysis is water, methods are applicable to air samples, tissues and soils. 4 Cr. Spring

ENV 437 Biostatistics (A). Prerequisite: MTH 121 or higher. Introduction to statistical analysis including descriptive statistics, test selection (including t-tests, regression, ANOVA, and nonparametric alternatives), calculation, interpretation, hypothesis formation and testing, Consideration is given to experimental design and appropriate evaluation of statistical application and interpretation. 3 Cr. Fall

ENV 439 Conservation Biology (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the scientific study of conservation biology. Examines current theories and data from evolutionary biology, ecology, and genetics as they relate to the conservation of biological diversity. Topics include causes of extinction, habitat loss and fragmentation, design of nature reserves, landscape ecology, application of basic principles of population biology to species conservation, and restoration ecology. 3 Cr. Even Fall

ENV 440 Herpetology (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the scientific study of reptiles and amphibians. Explores their form, function, ecology, and evolution. Topics include anatomy, physiology, mating systems, population and community ecology of herpefauna, and their conservation biology. Includes lab and field study of identification techniques and capture and census methods. 4 Cr. Odd Spring

ENV 444 Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology (A). Introduction to the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world and the stresses they face due to global environmental change such as rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, global warming, declining biodiversity, invasive species and elevated nitrogen deposition. Systems will be compared and contrasted with respect to their major characteristics, including vegetation, energy flow, and nutrient cycling and inputs. 3 Cr. Even Spring

ENV 452 Environmental Laws and Regulations (A). Introduction to key federal and state environmental laws, how branches of government interact to enforce environmental laws and regulations, and the roles scientists and lawyers play in resolving environmental issues. 3 Cr. Every Semester

ENV 457 Marine Biology-Bahamas (A). Cross-listed as ESC 457. Prerequisite: One laboratory science course. Prepare in the fall semester for a two-week January intersession field experience in coral reef biology and geology on San Salvador island in the Bahamas. Study identification, behavior, and ecology of marine organisms in five habitats associated with coral reefs. Learn how to prepare a scientific field notebook and to design, conduct, and report on a personal research project. 3 Cr. Fall

ENV 459 Mammalogy (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the scientific study of mammals. Explores their form, function, ecology, and evolution. Topics include origins, anatomy, physiology, diet and feeding strategies, population and community ecology, and social systems. Laboratory and field activities emphasize mammalian classification, habitat selection, and population biology. 4 Cr. Odd Fall

ENV 462 Aquatic Toxicology (A). Students will learn to perfume aquatic tests on water and sediment using standard fish and aquatic invertebrate test species. This will be accomplished through lectures, hands-on labs, data analyses, and student presentations. 4 Cr. Even Spring

ENV 464 Aquaculture I (A). Prerequisite ENV 303: Introduction to the principles and practices of intensive and extensive aquaculture. Topics include system design and operation; water quality maintenance; diet and nutrition; reproduction, selective breeding and genetics; disease identification and treatment; and the biology of cultured organisms. 4 Cr. Odd Fall

ENV 469 American Environmental Literature (A). This interdisciplinary course explores American environmental writing from both scientific and literary perspectives and investigates the relationship between natural science, natural history and environmental literature. Examines how subjective and objective investigations of the natural world enrich one another and lead to a more complete sense of place. Course includes lectures, discussions, group presentations and field exercises emphasizing description, measurement and aesthetic response. 3 Cr. Odd Fall

ENV 474 Aquaculture II (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the business aspects of aquaculture. Topics include aquaculture inputs, aquaculture production, farm management, processing, distribution, marketing, consumer behavior, pricing, government policy, modeling, international trade, transfer of technology, international cooperation, and environmental impacts. 4 Cr. Even Fall

ENV 476 Animal Ecophysiology (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to physiological adaptations of animals to their physical environment and the influence of these adaptations on animal distributions. Topics include temperature and energy metabolism, water and ion balance, oxygen availability, sensory and reproductive adaptations. Biochemical, cellular, and organism responses to these factors will be examined using an integrative and comparative approach. 3 Cr. Odd Fall

ENV 477 Field Biology (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the flora and fauna of various habitats in Western New York. Topics include structure and function of communities, species identification, qualitative and quantitative assessment of communities and ecosystems, and general conservation theory and practice. 1-4 Cr. Summer

ENV 483 Aquatic Invertebrates (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the scientific study of aquatic invertebrates and their importance in stream and lake ecosystems. Topics include invertebrate biology and ecology, classification and identification (insects, crustaceans, mites, annelids, mollusks, etc.), use of dichotomous keys and sampling equipment, and preparation techniques. Prepares students to predict habitat or water quality conditions based on the invertebrate fauna present. 4 Cr. Odd Spring

ENV 484 Fish Ecology. Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the scientific study of fish and fisheries. Topics include fish anatomy and physiology in relation to fish behavior and ecology, classification to the ordinal level, population dynamics (recruitment, growth, mortality, environment) and fishery management. ENV 490 is the complementary laboratory. 3 Cr. Even Spring

ENV 488 Environmental Impact Analysis (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to the process of preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) for a realistic local development project. Topics include the National Environmental Policy Act, the NY State Environmental Quality Review Act, relevant regulations and permit requirements (federal, state, local), and analysis of environmental impacts and alternatives. Depending on the number of credits and session offered, may include field work. 4-6 Cr. Summer

ENV 490 Fishery Techniques and Fish Identification (A). Prerequisite: ENV 303. Introduction to laboratory and field techniques used by fisheries scientists. Hands-on activities include fish collection methods (electrofishing, nets) fish anatomy, fish identification, and quantitative analysis of fisheries data. ENV 484 is the complementary lecture course. 2 Cr. Fall

ENV 492 Global Environmental Issues (A). This capstone course for senior environmental science majors will explore one or more major global environmental issues during the semester. Students will research the topic, analyze primary literature, engage in class discussion and formal speaking, and write a paper critically evaluating the issue and what should be done about it. 3 Cr. Spring

ENV 495 Topics in Environmental Science (A). Introduces a special field of study in the environmental sciences not offered in the regular curriculum. Details reflect student demand, needs, topics of interest, and instructor availability. 3-4 Cr. By Arrangement

ENV 498 Collaborative Research (A). In collaboration with a faculty mentor, the student designs, conducts and prepares a scientific report on a research project in the field or laboratory. A total of three credits from ENV 498 and ENV 499 (Independent Study) combined can be applied toward the Environmental Science major. 1-3 Cr. By Arrangement

ENV 499 Independent Study (A). In collaboration with a faculty mentor, the student reviews literature and prepares a report on a topic of interest in the environmental sciences. A total of three credits from ENV 499 and ENV 498 (Collaborative Research) combined can be applied toward the Environmental Science major. 1-3 Cr. By Arrangement


The information in this publication was current as of June 2007 when the text was compiled. Changes, including but not restricted to, tuition and fees, course descriptions, degree and program requirements, policies, and financial aid availability may have occurred since that time. Whether or not a specific course is scheduled for a given term is contingent on enrollment, budget and staffing. The college reserves the right to make any changes it finds necessary and may announce such changes for student notification in publications other than the College catalogs. For the purpose of degree and program completion, students are bound by the requirements in effect as stated in the printed catalog at the time of their matriculation at SUNY Brockport. Inquiries on the current status of requirements can be addressed to the appropriate College department of office. Also refer to the Brockport Web site home page at www.brockport.edu for current information.

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