Skip Navigation

Undergraduate Studies Catalog 2007-2009

Department of Military Science - United States Army ROTC

C29 Cooper Hall
(585) 395-2249

Chair and Professor: William S. Cragg, MSA, Central Michigan University; Assistant Professors: Christopher Fahrenbach, BA, Vanderbilt University; Daniel Fletcher, BA, SUNY Brockport; Charles Meyer, MSEd, SUNY Oswego; Stanley Schall, MS, Troy State University; Nicholas A. Teta, BA, SUNY Albany; Instructors: Timothy Hall, AAS, Jefferson Community College; John Leggat; Support Staff: Marvin Pawlowski, Rodney Brinkman.

The military science program offers courses of study leading to an academic minor in military science and an officer’s commission in the United States Army. Students may enroll in lower-division courses without incurring a military service obligation. The courses provide theoretical and practical training in leadership and management principles and applications, basic military skills, and officer responsibilities.

The military science program at the upper-division level consists of instruction in military skills, tactics, communications, and practical leadership experience.
The lower-division portion must be completed before enrollment in the upper division is approved. All contracted students receive a stipend of $300-$500 per month for each month in school up to $4,500 per academic year. Admission to the upper-division program requires the acceptance and approval of the Professor of Military Science, (585) 395-2249.

Additional military training available through participation in the program includes the US Army’s Airborne School, Air Assault School, Northern Warfare School, and Army Nurse Training. Other typical activities during a semester include field training exercises at an Army installation and military formals. Merit-based scholarships are available to interested and qualified students. All scholarships pay for full tuition and fees, a flat rate for textbooks valued at $900 ($450 each semester), and an allowance of up to $4,500 for every year the scholarship is in effect.


The department offers minors under two options.

Option 1—Academic Minor in Military Science and US Army Officer’s Commission

Lower Division Course Prerequisites for the minor: Credits
MSC 101 Leadership and Personal Development
2
MSC 102 Foundations in Leadership
2
MSC 201 Innovative Tactical Leadership
3
MSC 202 Leadership in Changing Environments
3
Four approved three-credit liberal arts core courses
with grades of “C” or better (standard breadth components)
12
   
______
Total:
22

There are three alternatives for completing the lower division MSC course prerequisites.

Satisfy any of the following requirements with the approval of the Professor of Military Science:

1. Completion of a special accelerated program of study
OR
2. Prior honorable military service, which includes as a minimum successful completion of military basic training
OR
3. Completion of a special five-week summer training program
(Leadership Training Course), conducted off campus; all expenses
paid by the United States Army.

1Upper Division Course Prerequisites for Academic Minor and US Army Officer’s Commission

MSC 301 Adaptive Team Leadership
4
MSC 302 Leadership Development and Assessment
4
MSC 401 Developing Adaptive Leaders
4
MSC 402 Leadership in a Complex World
4
One approved military history course with grade of “C” or better
3
   
_____
Total:
19


Option 2—Minor in Military Science Only2

Lower Division Course Prerequisites:
Credits
MSC 101 Leadership and Personal Development
2
MSC 102 Foundations in Leadership
2
MSC 201 Innovative Tactical Leadership
3
MSC 202 Leadership in Changing Environments
3
Four approved three-credit liberal arts core courses
with grades of “C” or better (standard breadth components)
12
   
_____
Subtotal:
22

There are three alternatives for completing the lower division MSC course prerequisites:

1. Completion of a special accelerated program of study
OR
2. Prior honorable military service, which includes as a minimum successful completion of military basic training
OR
3. Completion of a special five-week summer training program
(Leadership Training Course), conducted off campus; all expenses
paid by the United States Army.

1Applicants for commissioning credit will complete the Leadership Development and Assessment Course following their junior year.

2Applicants for the minor will receive only academic credit, not commissioning credit.

Other Military Training - United States Air Force ROTC

Air Force ROTC is available to all full-time students through cross-registration with Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). Details concerning Air Force ROTC classes and scholarships may be obtained by calling RIT at (585) 475-5196.

Military Science Courses

MSC 101 Leadership and Personal Development (A). Introduces students to the personal challenges and competencies critical for effective leadership. Students learn how personal development of life skills, such as goal setting, time management, physical fitness and stress management, relate to leadership, officership and the Army profession. Focus is placed on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army Leadership Dimensions while gaining an understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. Classes meet for one hour of classroom instruction and two hours of leadership lab per week. Students incur no military obligation. Meets GEP 100 requirement. See Option 1 Academic Minor MSC 101. 2 Cr.

MSC 102 Foundations in Leadership (B). Provides an overview of leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback and using effective writing skills. Explores dimensions of leadership values, attributes, skills and actions in the context of practical, hands-on and interactive exercises. Classes meet for one hour of classroom instruction and two hours of leadership lab per week. Students incur no military obligation. 2 Cr.

MSC 103 Military Fitness and Conditioning (B). Provides skills necessary to develop a balanced, military-type fitness program for a group while maintaining focus on the individualís needs and progression. Also provides an understanding of the whole-body fitness and conditioning principals used by the Army. Helps students develop skills necessary to plan, implement, evaluate and manage a military fitness program. Students incur no military obligation. 1 Cr. Fall

MSC 104 Military Conditioning Lab (B). Provides skills necessary to develop a balanced, military-type fitness program for a group while maintaining focus on the individualís needs and progression. Also provides an understanding of the whole-body fitness and conditioning principals used by the Army. Helps students develop skills necessary to plan, implement, evaluate and manage a military fitness program. Students incur no military obligation. 1 Cr. Spring

MSC 201 Innovative Tactical Leadership (B). Explores dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by studying historical case studies and engaging in interactive student exercises. Students practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing and assessing team exercises. Focuses on the continued development of the knowledge of leadership values and attributes through an understanding of rank, uniform, customs and courtesies. Classes meet for two hours of classroom instruction and two hours of leadership lab per week. Students incur no military obligation. 3 Cr.

MSC 202 Leadership in Changing Environments (B). Examines the challenges of leading in complex contemporary operating environments. Dimensions of the cross-cultural challenges of leadership in a constantly changing world are highlighted and applied to practical Army leadership tasks and situations. Develops greater self-awareness as students practice communication and team-building skills. Contemporary Operating Environment case studies give insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real-world scenarios. Classes meet for two hours of classroom instruction and two hours of leadership lab per week. Students incur no military obligation. 3 Cr.

MSC 301 Adaptive Team Leadership (B). Prerequisite: MSC 202. Challenges cadets to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with the demands of the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Challenging scenarios related to small unit tactical operations are used to develop self-awareness and critical-thinking skills. Cadets receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership abilities. Cadets begin to analyze and evaluate their own leadership values, attributes, skills and actions. Primary attention is given to preparation for LDAC and the development of leadership qualities. Classes meet for three hours of classroom instruction and two hours of leadership lab per week. 4 Cr.

MSC 302 Leader Development and Assessment (B). Prerequisite: MSC 301. Uses increasingly intense situational leadership challenges to build cadet awareness and skills in leading small units. Skills in decision-making, persuading, and motivating team members are explored, evaluated, and developed. Aspects of military operations are reviewed as a means of preparing for the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Cadets are expected to apply basic principles to Army training and motivation to troop-leading procedures. Emphasis also is placed on conducting military briefings and developing proficiency of operation orders. Classes meet for three hours of classroom instruction and two hours of leadership lab per week. 4 Cr.

MSC 310 Survey of American Military History (A). Does not count toward the major in history or fulfillment of General Education requirements for history. Focuses on a narrative of American military history following a chronological format. Emphasizes the role of the American military as an element of national power and how the government wields it in domestic and foreign relationships. Class discussions and course work also cover the impact of technology on war, civil and political-military relationships, growth and the overall organization of the American armed forces and impact of its use on United States and world history. 3 Cr. Every Semester

MSC 401 Developing Adaptive Leaders (B). Prerequisites: MSC 301: MSC 302 and one of HST 327, HST 355, HST 356, HST 362, HST 417 or HST 419. Develops cadet proficiency in planning, executing and assessing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and providing leadership performance feedback to subordinates. Cadets are given situational opportunities to assess risk, make ethical decisions and provide coaching to fellow ROTC cadets. Cadets are challenged to analyze, evaluate and instruct younger cadets. Both their classroom and battalion leadership experiences are designed to prepare cadets for their first unit of assignment. Cadets identify responsibilities of key staff, coordinate staff roles, and use situational opportunities to teach, train and develop subordinates. Classes meet for three hours of classroom instruction and two hours of leadership lab per week. 4 Cr.

MSC 402 Leadership in a Complex World (B). Prerequisites: MSC 401, MSC 301 and MSC 302. Explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations. Cadets examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. Aspects of interacting with non-governmental organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support are examined and evaluated. Significant emphasis is placed on preparing cadets for their first unit of assignment. Case studies, scenarios and decision-making exercises are used to prepare cadets to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as commissioned officers in the United States Army. Classes meet for three hours of classroom instruction and two hours of leadership lab per week. 4 Cr.


The information in this publication was current as of June 2007 when the text was compiled. Changes, including but not restricted to, tuition and fees, course descriptions, degree and program requirements, policies, and financial aid availability may have occurred since that time. Whether or not a specific course is scheduled for a given term is contingent on enrollment, budget and staffing. The college reserves the right to make any changes it finds necessary and may announce such changes for student notification in publications other than the College catalogs. For the purpose of degree and program completion, students are bound by the requirements in effect as stated in the printed catalog at the time of their matriculation at SUNY Brockport. Inquiries on the current status of requirements can be addressed to the appropriate College department of office. Also refer to the Brockport Web site home page at www.brockport.edu for current information.