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Undergraduate Studies Catalog 2007-2009

Department of Theatre

1101 Tower Fine Arts Building
(585) 395-2478

Chair and Associate Professor: Francis X. Kuhn, MFA, Southern Methodist University; Professors: Oh-Kon Cho, PhD, Michigan State University; Richard St. George, MFA, Illinois State University; Associate Professors: Gail Argetsinger, MA, Bowling Green State University; William Hullfish, Jr., EdD, SUNY Buffalo; P. Gibson Ralph, MA, University of Michigan; Assistant Professors: Davida Bloom, PhD, University of Colorado; Ruth Childs, MFA, University of Minnesota-Minneapolis; Natalie Sarrazin, PhD, University of Maryland; Professional Staff: Gary T. Musante, Technical Director, MFA, University of Michigan; Lecturers: Michael Krickmire, MFA, Illinois State University; Herbert Wise, PhD, Eastman School of Music.

The Department of Theatre is committed to providing its students with theatre training within a liberal arts environment. The department is focused on student learning acquired through classes and productions as its highest priority, and is dedicated to upholding the integrity of theatre as it fosters an artistic environment that nurtures developing theatre artists, scholars and technicians. Theatre education is relevant in many applications and is useful to, and enriching for, people in many different occupations.

The department is committed to sustaining a vital artistic synergy with the surrounding community and the greater society through productions and other theatrical and musical presentations by its students, faculty and guest artists.

At SUNY Brockport, theatre classes and productions are open to any student, whatever his or her major or interest.

Suggested career areas in theatre:

Actor/Actress Drama Therapist Scene Designer
Arts Administrator Lighting Designer Sound Designer
Business Manager Lighting Technician Stage Manager
Costume Designer Make-up Specialist Teacher
Critic Producer Technical Director
Director Property Specialist Wardrobe Mistress

Two academic programs are available: (1) major in theatre, BA or BS; (2) minor in theatre. The major in theatre is 43 credits: 29 credits in the common required core, three credits in upper division performance, three credits in upper division dramatic literature, and 8 credits by advisement in the area of emphasis.

Required Core for all Theatre Majors: Credits
THE 201 Theatre Arts (A,P)
3
THE 202 Stagecraft (B)
3
THE 221 Introduction to Acting (A, B)
3
THE 239 Introduction to Design (A)
3
THE 307 Fundamentals of Stage Management (A)
1
THE 308 Stage Management Practicum (A)
1
THE 314 History of Theatre I (A)
3
THE 315 History of Theatre II (A)
3
THE 319 Play Analysis (A, W)
3
THE 351 Directing (A)
3
THE 401 Research in Theatre (A)
1
THE 402 Senior Project in Theatre (A)
2
Common Core Total:
29
   
Plus One Upper Division Performance Course:
THE 322 Intermediate Acting (B)
3
THE 323 Advanced Acting (B)
3
THE 324 Physical Vocal Training (A)
3
THE 422 Acting Lab (B)
3
THE 426 Improvisational Studio (B)
3
THE 493 Special Topics in Theatre–Performance (A)
3
Upper Division Performance Total:
3
 
Plus One Upper Division Dramatic Literature Course:
THE 353 Children’s Theatre (A)
3
THE 410 Contemporary Women Playwrights (A,W)
3
THE 492 Special Topics in Theatre–Literature (A)
3
Upper Division Dramatic Literature Total:
3
Plus Emphasis-Specific Courses by Advisement:
8
______
Total:
43

Minor in Theatre

Students are invited to minor in theatre to enhance their knowledge and experience as well as to participate in theatre. A minimum of 18 credits is required.

The following six credits are required courses: Credits
THE 111 Introduction to Theatre (A,F)
3
OR  
THE 201 Theatre Arts (A,P)
3
AND  
THE 202 Stagecraft (B)
3
OR  
THE 101-107 Practicum (B) (1 credit per semester for 3 semesters)
3
Plus Minimum of Four Additional Theatre Courses
12
______
Total:
18

Stage Management Requirement

All theatre majors are required to serve as a stage manager or assistant stage manager. This requirement can be fulfilled by stage-managing one of the following productions while enrolled in the required course, THE 308 Stage Management:

1. Faculty-directed shows

2. Second-season shows

3. Special projects (plays or scenes assigned from appropriate directing and/or acting classes)

4. Senior projects

5. Mini-tour

Production/Audition Participation Requirement

1. All theatre majors, minors and arts for children—theatre specialty students must participate in the production program of the department.

2. All theatre majors, minors and arts for children—theatre specialty students are urged to participate in auditions for faculty-directed productions based on departmental guidelines.

Interdisciplinary Arts for Children: Theatre Specialty

Students seeking an interdisciplinary major in arts for children with a specialty in theatre are required to complete a 48-credit program consisting of: (1) two interdisciplinary courses, IAC 280 Introduction to Related Arts for Children, and IAC 491 Seminar in Arts for Children; (2) a theatre specialty of 21 credits; and (3) a 21-credit block consisting of two courses in each of the other three arts and one approved elective. Students wishing to major in arts for children with a theatre specialty must participate in the production program of the Department of Theatre. A minimum grade of “C” must be maintained in all required courses.
For detailed information and a comprehensive listing of courses required in this specialty area, refer to the section Arts for Children-Interdisciplinary Major in this catalog.

Theatre Courses

THE 101 Acting Practicum (B). Allows students to develop an understanding of the theatre production process through a practicum experience in acting. Course open to students who have been cast in Mainstage productions. 1 Cr.

THE 102 Lighting Practicum (B). Allows students to develop an understanding of the theatre production process through a practicum experience in stage lighting. 1 Cr.

THE 103 Directing Practicum (B). Allows students to develop an understanding of the theatre production through a practicum experience in directing. 1 Cr.

THE 104 Sound Practicum (B). Allows students to develop an understanding of the theatre production process through a practicum experience in sound. 1 Cr.

THE 105 Painting Practicum (B). Allows students to develop an understanding of the theatre production process through a practicum experience in painting scenery for Mainstage productions. 1 Cr.

THE 106 Costume Practicum (B). Allows students to develop an understanding of the theatre production process through a practicum experience in costume design and construction. 1 Cr.

THE 107 Stage Crew Practicum (B). Allows students to develop an understanding of the theatre production process through a practicum experience as part of a stage crew. 1 Cr.

THE 111 Introduction to Theatre (A,F). Allows students to develop an understanding of the basic elements and unique characteristics of the theatre arts. Studies representative dramatic master- pieces. 3 Cr. Every Semester

THE 112 Looking At Performance (A,F). Introduces students to the principal systems employed by performance forms to communicate meaning. Embraces a performance studies perspective, focusing on a wide array of performance activities in the fine arts (including theater, dance, music, visual art and interdisciplinary performance forms) as well as political debates, sporting events and other “everyday” performances. Addresses primary questions such as: How do we experience and understand performance? How is meaning constructed and encoded in performance? What role do the fine arts play in society and how does performance manifest the culture from which it emanates? Involves assigned readings, lectures, demonstrations, video/audio samples and attendance at assigned performance events. 3 Cr.

THE 200 Voice and Diction (A). Provides a basis for improving the voice, including proper breathing, resonance, phonation and articulation. Emphasizes elimination of regional accents, proficiency in articulation of vowel, diphthong and consonant sounds and increased awareness of variety in pitch, inflection and volume. Includes study of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). 3 Cr.

THE 201 Theatre Arts (A,P). Provides an introduction to theatre from a production perspective. The course includes basic analysis of the play script, development of production concepts, exploring production styles from an historical perspective, and following the page to stage process of departmental production. Course requires participation on the crew of a Mainstage production. 3 Cr. Every Semester

THE 202 Stagecraft (B). Familiarizes students with the theatre technician’s tools, areas of theatre, and factors that comprise production work in scenery construction. 3 Cr. Every Semester. THE 221 Introduc

THE 232 Improvisational Theatre (A,P). Covers principles and techniques of improvisation as an art form, and fundamentals of ensemble-playing, characterization and play-making (creation of scenarios). Explores the effect of the dramatic process on communication skills and human development. 3 Cr. Every Semester

THE 235 Stage Lighting I (A). Prerequisite: THE 202. Introduces the use of various types of lighting equipment. Studies basic design and color theory and practice. Requires students to serve as lighting crew for departmental productions. 3 Cr. THE 236 Theatre Graphics (B). In

THE 239 Introduction to Design for the Theatre (A). An introduction to: the elements and principles of design for theatre; the roles of the scenic, costume, lighting, and sound designer in the production process; the analysis of text from the design perspective and the methods and media used to represent design concepts. Research and analysis includes contemporary and historical concepts and practices in the visual aspects of theatre design. 3 Cr.

THE 244 Costume Construction I (A). Studies theories and procedures in building stage costumes, including pattern draping, fabric modification and embellishment, basic costume construction techniques, and shop safety. Allows students to acquire basic sewing skills as well as practical backstage experience. 3 Cr.

THE 281 Creative Drama (A). Covers theories of creative drama. Provides discussion and demonstrations of the process mode art form, application to child development and to curriculum, and micro teaching units with lab class emphasizing improvisation exercises and story dramatization. 3 Cr.

THE 307 Fundamentals of Stage Management (A). Provides a basic introduction to the role and responsibilities of a production stage manager in the production process. Emphasis is placed on the skills required to stage manage a fully realized production. 1 Cr.

THE 308 Stage Management Practicum (B). Prerequisite: THE 307. Allows students to develop an understanding of the theatre production process through a practicum experience in the stage management of a department production. 1 Cr.

THE 314 History of Theatre I: Classical through Renaissance (A). Surveys the origin and development, production techniques, acting styles, and significant plays from the classical period through the Renaissance. Also includes the discussion of aesthetics, rituals, functions, and theatre traditions of non-Western cultures: India, China, Japan, Korea, Africa, Latin America, etc. 3 Cr. Fall

THE 315 History of Theatre II: Romanticism Through Modern (A). Covers the development of theatre and drama from the 19th century to the present. 3 Cr. Spring

THE 319 Play Analysis (A,W). Studies selected plays from the directorial point of view. Includes analysis of themes, characters, structures, and styles; discussion of women’s perspectives based on the plays written by women; understanding characteristics of the plays written by ethnic minority writers; and critique of productions. 3 Cr.

THE 322 Intermediate Acting (B). Continues the exploration of acting. Emphasizes character development and analysis through scene work and discussion. 3 Cr.

THE 323 Advanced Acting (B). Prerequisite: THE 322. Provides advanced work in developing the craft of acting with particular emphasis on characterization and script analysis. The student will also be expected to be able to articulate and justify his/her acting choices. 3 Cr.

THE 324 Physical and Vocal Training I (A). Prerequisite: THE 200. Provides a basic introduction to the coordination of the voice and body as an instrument of communication. Emphasizes proper body alignment and efficient vocalization, including relaxation techniques, proper breathing and resonance exercise, and exploration of the mind-body voice as a unified entity. 3 Cr.

THE 332 Scene Design I (A). Prerequisite: THE 239. Requires students to translate a visual metaphor into a design for the stage, use the basic elements of design and the principles of composition and communicate that design to others via the graphic process. Analyzes design and explores our age in the history of theatrical design, both Western and Non-Western. 3 Cr.

THE 333 Scene Design II (B). Prerequisite: THE 332. Explores historical and conceptual styles of scenic design, advanced model and rendering techniques and advanced portfolio development. 3 Cr.

THE 334 Scene Painting (B). Provides an introduction to the principles of large scale painting including application techniques suitable for representation of a variety of surface types, color mixing theory, enlargement from renderings and hard/soft cover techniques. 3 Cr.

THE 336 Stage Lighting II (B). Prerequisite: THE 235. Provides an advance study of lighting design and practice. Includes draft lighting plots and related paperwork. Students will work with computer control systems, AutoCAD and other computer applications in current use in stage lighting. May provide practical design assignments. 3 Cr.

THE 338 Technical Production I (A). Prerequisite: THE 202. Advance study of shop equipment; construction techniques for two-dimensional and three-dimensional scenery; and theoretical knowledge of production. Students will produce both theoretical and practical projects. Supervision of student crews is required. 3 Cr.

THE 341 History of Costume (A). Covers history of apparel from ancient to modern times using primary source material. Considers the roles of social, political, and technological changes in the evolution of style. Prepares the student to evaluate and adapt historical dress for stage design. Requires a research paper. 3 Cr.

THE 345 Stage Makeup I (A). Covers techniques in stage makeup, including uses and characteristics of makeup materials and methods of application, character analysis and design of realistic, old age, wounds and scars, caricature and fantasy. 3 Cr.

THE 347 Costume Design I (A). Covers the fundamentals of costume design: principles, character analysis, and use of historical source material; analysis of how clothing reveals character and motive; and selection of colors, forms, fibers, and weaves appropriate to the mood, style, period, and interpretation of a play. 3 Cr.

THE 348 Costume Design II (A). Prerequisite: THE 347. Advanced projects in costume design and technology, such as exploring styles and techniques in designing film, theatre and dance costumes, involving a variety of historical, contemporary, and non-traditional theatre pieces. Allows students to design/assist in workshop/lab/Mainstage theatre productions in order to apply theory to practical experience. 3 Cr.

THE 351 Directing I (A). Prerequisite: THE 221. Prepares students for directing, including intensive analysis of the playscript, review of the rehearsal process, basic principles of composition, picturization and movement. 3 Cr.

THE 353 Children’S Theatre (A). Covers dramatic literature for young audiences, representative forms and theatres, historical perspective and current trends. Includes theory and practice. 3 Cr.

THE 363 Playwriting (A,W). Cross-listed as WMS 363. Covers principles of playwriting. Requires preparation, with class discussion and critiques of an original one-act play. Includes optional rehearsed reading. 3 Cr.

THE 365 Puppet Theatre (A). Covers the historical roots of puppetry and its relationship to other arts, especially theatre; and designing, constructing, and manipulating various kinds of puppets. Emphasis is placed upon puppet design and construction and the development of puppet theatre scripts. 3 Cr.

THE 399 Independent Study in Theatre (A). Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. To be defined in consultation with the instructor-sponsor and in accordance with the procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 1-3 Cr.

THE 400 Theatre Viewing (A). Provides students with the tools and opportunity to critically analyze, evaluate and appreciate theatre productions. Enables students to view several professional theatre productions and participate in backstage tours and discussion with artistic staff. 3 Cr.

THE 401 Research in Theatre (A). Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. Covers research methods used in theatre. Requires students to design and formulate a project in the area of their specialization in theatre, which will be completed in THE 402, including necessary research and a written proposal for the project. 1 Cr. Every Semester

THE 402 Senior Project in Theatre (A). Prerequisite: THE 401. Requires preparation and execution of a research project. 2 Cr. Every Semester

THE 410 Contemporary Women Playwrights (A,D,W). Cross-listed as WMS 410. Explores ways in which contemporary female playwrights present gender and gendered experiences, and how the construction of women is staged in a variety of cultural contexts through an examination of selected works by 20th-century female playwrights from America, Africa, China and England (with units on African-American, Chicana, Lesbian and Asian-American writers). Includes an investigation of feminist theory as it applies to theatre practices. 3 Cr.

THE 414 American Theatre (A,W). Covers the development of American theatre from the Colonial period to present time, particularly theatre architecture, production techniques, scene design, styles of acting, producers, plays, and playwrights. 3 Cr.

THE 420 Theatre and Dilemmas of the Society (A,I). Explores the role played by the theatre in raising consciousness toward significant social, political, educational, religious, and technological developments. 3 Cr.

THE 422 Acting Lab (B). Prerequisite: THE 323 or instructor’s permission. Provides the opportunity to explore advanced acting issues, such as developing a character based on movement, phonetic transcription, dialects, and audition techniques. The class includes public performance. 3 Cr.

THE 426 Improvisational Studio (B). Prerequisite: THE 232 and instructor’s permission. Provides advanced work in giving dramatic structure to ideas and stories. Requires performance for and leadership of groups of various ages in improvisation. 3 Cr.

THE 450 Field Experiences in Theatre (A). Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Allows students to identify methods, techniques, and procedures involved in the project being studied, perform these functions and/or observations, and plan a design for implementing the project in a different situation. 1-12 Cr.

THE 483 Creative Drama Practicum (B). Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission and THE 281. Examines current theories in creative drama in the United States and England. Requires research and preparation of appropriate activities as part of training leaders, and 20 hours of independent work in an educational institution or community agency. 3 Cr.

THE 490 Special Topics in Academic Theatre (A). Covers topics such as non-Western theatre, dramatic theory and criticism, and contemporary trends in theatre. The exact nature of the topic and instructional methodology are defined by the instructor. 3 Cr.

THE 491 Special Topics in Theatre Production (B). Topics such as advanced directing and advanced problems in scenery, costume and lighting will be offered periodically. The exact nature of the topic and instructional methodology will be defined by the instructor. 3 Cr.

THE 492 Special Topics in Theatre - Literature (A). Covers topics in the study, analysis, creation and criticism of dramatic literature. The exact nature of the topic and instructional methodology are defined by the instructor. 3 Cr. By Arrangement

THE 493 Special Topics in Theatre-Performance (A). Covers topics in the study, analysis, and creation of theatrical performance. Topics may include but are not restricted to Non-Western performance styles, contemporary schools of performance, guerilla theatre, and the theories of Boal. The exact nature of the topic and instructional methodology are defined by the instructor. 3 Cr. By Arrangement

THE 499 Advanced Independent Study in Theatre (A). Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. To be defined in consultation with the instructor- sponsor and in accordance with the procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 1-3 Cr.


The information in this publication was current as of June 2007 when the text was compiled. Changes, including but not restricted to, tuition and fees, course descriptions, degree and program requirements, policies, and financial aid availability may have occurred since that time. Whether or not a specific course is scheduled for a given term is contingent on enrollment, budget and staffing. The college reserves the right to make any changes it finds necessary and may announce such changes for student notification in publications other than the College catalogs. For the purpose of degree and program completion, students are bound by the requirements in effect as stated in the printed catalog at the time of their matriculation at SUNY Brockport. Inquiries on the current status of requirements can be addressed to the appropriate College department of office. Also refer to the Brockport Web site home page at www.brockport.edu for current information.

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