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Department of English

Fall 2014 English and Film Courses

Majors reservation week is March 31 - April 4.  English majors, see your advisor that week to discuss your schedule and sign up early for Fall 2014 English classes.  English minors, Film Studies minors, and all others will register according to the schedule set up by the Office of Registration and Records.

For many English courses, the approach and reading list vary according to the instructor. The instructor-specific course descriptions that are listed below will help you plan.  Do check the official schedule on Banner as well.

Professor Anne Panning is away from Brockport on sabbatical.  If she is your advisor, you have been assigned a temporary advisor this semester.  Check the bulletin board near the English Department office in Hartwell or email jwhorton@brockport.edu.  



Fall 2014 Undergraduate Course Descriptions


ENG 210.01 Creative Writing

CRN #5417
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.   R
Dr. Stephen Fellner
Location:  TBD

Often creative writing classes become bogged down in perfunctory affirmation and rote criticisms. A key component in this class will be developing a heightened awareness of the ways in which texts are evaluated, discussed. Through intensive self-reflection and conversation, we will challenge and find alternatives to the myth of the creative writer as someone whose sole goal is "to fully express himself" in seclusion, battling inner demons and the worthless society that fails to understand his Art. Even though the class will ultimately settle into a workshop format readings will be intensive, emphasizing texts that present the readers with distinct formal challenges. Students will be required to turn in two pieces that best exploits their talents, needs.

Because the best ways to improve as a writer are to read, to write, and to revise, this course will focus heavily on all three of these activities. It is my strong belief that reading and writing with passionate regularity (and irregular passion) are the best ways to grow as a writer, so the reading for this course will be extensive.

The writing workshop requires much from each writer in order to be successful. Participation is crucial to success (both academic and artistic) in the course. We will discuss the ins and outs of workshop at length, but at this point, I want you all to feel welcome and free in this course to express yourselves, and to remind you that in order to create the comfortable atmosphere conducive to a superlative workshop experience, we must all follow a high set of standards, both of preparedness and of courtesy.


ENG 210.02 Creative Writing

CRN #5418
9:30 – 10:45 a.m.   T R
Mr. Thomas Metzger
LAB

ENG 210 is an introductory level course that will give students opportunities to explore poetry, and short fiction. Besides basic writer's craft, editing and critical response will be
emphasized.


ENG 210.03 Creative Writing

CRN #5419
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.   T R
Mr. Thomas Metzger
LAB

Same as above.


ENG 210.04 Creative Writing

CRN #5420
2:30 – 3:20 p.m.   M W F
Mrs. M.J. Iuppa
LAB

This gateway course is a four genre smorgasbord that's guaranteed to whet the creative writer's appetite. Students will explore the fundamental skills of poetry, fiction, nonfiction and play writing. For some, this creative writing workshop experience will be new– unlike any other they've experienced; while others may find this workshop an opportunity to push their writing skills further. The course is designed around the belief that one must read widely and closely in order to write. This is an intensive writing course, meant for students who are dedicated readers and serious about the process of writing. We will examine the works of both established and emerging writers in hopes of discerning and emulating the qualities of good poetry, fiction, nonfiction and play writing. Frequent writing exercises will provide the opportunity to practice, to imitate, and to experiment. Class members will work together to create a welcoming and productive workshop, including extensive in-class discussion of both published writers and student work. Students will write four critical shorts that explore elements of writer's craft.

At the end of the semester, each student will submit a portfolio of selected (revised) creative works. Get ready for an all you can write semester.


ENG 210.05 Creative Writing

CRN #5421
3:35 – 4:50 p.m.   M W
Mrs. M.J. Iuppa
LAB

Same as above.


ENG 220.01 Early World Literature: Gods, Heroes, Devils
Meets the World Literature requirement

CRN #5700
1:25 – 2:15 p.m.   M W F
Dr. Sevinc Turkkan
LAB

This course studies the epic, religious, and dramatic traditions of the ancient world from the beginnings until around 14th century of the Common Era. The selected readings offer insights into the literary, religious, and philosophical traditions of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, showing their continuities and discontinuities among each other as well as between them and those of Europe. We will critically examine notions such as "West" and "non-West" and will discuss the premises of cultural and civilizational differences in relation to the assigned readings. The literary heritage of the world spans five millennia of recorded history: from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, and Japan to modern times around the globe. No single course could possibly represent the infinite magnitude of the world's literary heritage; nevertheless, we must seriously work at expanding our awareness and understanding of the world in which we live based on the literary tradition we have inherited.


ENG 220.02 Early World Literature
Meets the World Literature requirement

CRN #5701
2:30 – 3:20 p.m.   M W F
Dr. Sevinc Turkkan
LAB

Same as above.


ENG 223.01 Modern World Literature
Meets the World Literature requirement

CRN #5474
11:15 – 12:05 p.m.   M W F
Ms. Herma Volpe-van Dijk      
LAB

Explores literatures of the world since 1700 with a focus on texts outside the British and American literary traditions.  Introduces major themes and developments in modern world literature, from a global and comparative perspective; situates the Western literary tradition within that larger framework.


ENG 223.02 Modern World Literature
Meets the World Literature requirement

CRN #5475
12:20 – 1:10 p.m.   M W F
Dr. J. Roger Kurtz      
LAB

"What's the use of stories that aren't even true?"  That's the question that Haroun asks his story-telling father in the first book that we will read in this class, and it's a question we will also ask throughout the semester as we read a wide range of stories from around the world and through time.

 This course has these major goals:

 ·         To read a variety of literature from a wide range of cultural contexts.
 ·         To understand some of the ways that stories (fiction) in fact influence and shape who we are.
 ·         To appreciate the ability of literary works to transcend cultural difference.
 ·         To appreciate the ability of literary works to intensify cultural difference.
 ·         To understand the possible relationship of literary works to social conflict arising from issues such as racism, ethnic hatred, or religious intolerance.

This is a liberal arts course (A), it meets the general education requirement for a course in the humanities (H), and it is a course that studies "other world civilizations" (O).  If you are an English major, it may count as one of your World Literature requirements.


ENG 224.01 Filming Rome
Meets the World Literature requirement

CRN #
9:30 – 10:45 a.m.   T R
Dr. J. Austin Busch
Location:  TBD

This course studies the history, institutions, and society of the Roman Empire, including Rome's emergence as a global imperial power and the roles women and slaves played in cosmopolitan Roman society. People today often think of Rome as the historical foundation of Western Culture, and imagine multi-culturalism as a modern political orientation—perhaps one to embrace; perhaps to resist. We will in fact spend a good deal of time this semester examining contemporary cinematic and televised representations of Rome that explicitly assimilate it to such an ideological model. But when we examine the literary, artistic, and historical remnants of the Roman Empire itself, we will find that it was a mix of peoples as diverse as Celtic pagans and Coptic Christians, Greek philosophers and North African religious extremists. In studying the Empire, we are studying a relatively stable but highly complex, multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, religiously diverse, and linguistically polyglot social and political community. As we examine discrete issues of Roman history, we will keep in mind that the "Roman view" of slavery, for example, or of women, or of gladiatorial combat, was always polymorphous, as diverse and contended as was the Empire itself.


ENG 230.01 British Literature I
Meets the British before 1800 requirement

CRN #5413
11:15 – 12:05 p.m.   M W F
Dr. Elizabeth Whittingham
Location:  TBD

Ever fought an underwater battle? visited Fairyland? competed in a storytelling contest? fought a dragon or a giant green knight? walked in the garden of Eden? Then come join us for a vicarious experience through early English literature that will cover the 1000 years from Beowulf to Milton.

We will read works by such authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. We will follow the development of the English language, and examine these works within their social, cultural, and political context. Requirements include a challenging reading load, two papers involving research, class participation, and pop quizzes. This course fulfills the British Literature before 1800 requirement.


ENG 234.01 Austen & Pop Culture
Meets the British after 1800 requirement

CRN #6723
11:00 – 12:15 p.m.   T R
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot  
LAB

Jane Austen published six novels between the years 1811 and 1818, and we are still reading, adapting, re-imagining, and modernizing them today. This course will ask you to consider why Jane Austen's life and work continue to be relevant to readers today, and also what Jane Austen's popular cultural context looked like. Our emphasis will be on women's reading and writing, and the development of the Romance and novelistic genres in both the early nineteenth century and in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Why are we still so obsessed with the works of Jane Austen today? What does this obsession say about gender roles and identities, about women's writing, and about the way that Austen's works are used to imagine and perform these gender roles? The early nineteenth century marked an era in which women writers were increasingly aligned with novels and novel writing, while they also had to maintain a balance between public and private identities: is this still the case today? We will consider the importance of understanding the early contexts of Austen's novels in order to attempt to understand their current popularity and the way that modern and postmodern authors, filmmakers, and marketers adapt and change these early contexts for today's readers and audiences.


ENG 235.01 Intro. to African American Literature
Meets the American after 1900 requirement

CRN #5422
2:30 – 3:20 p.m.   M W F
Dr. Althea Tait
Location: TBD

This course is designed for students to study the literature by African Americans written between the 18th and 21st centuries. While much of the material covered is considered canonical, we will also examine the works of lesser known authors. As a community we will consider important questions such as: is there a Black literary aesthetic? Is art ever a-political for African American wordsmiths? Can a work be overburdened by the political? How does an African American literary work become canonized? How does one theorize about African American literary works? And did early African American writers contribute to criticism and theories about their work? The course is interdisciplinary in nature, allowing for a greater understanding of the works’ reflection on issues that have affected African Americans over time. We will conduct close-listening sessions of music from different epochs, have community readings of select pieces, screen related films and documentaries, as well as, read a variety of works and correlating criticism.


ENG 235.02 Intro Afro-American Literature
Meets the American after 1900 requirement

CRN #6810
12:20 – 1:10 p.m.   M W F
Dr. Althea Tait    
Location: TBD

 Same as above.


ENG 241.01 American Literature II
Meets the American after 1900 requirement
CRN #5416
2:00 - 3:15 p.m.   T R
Dr. Megan Obourn
Location:  TBD

American Literature II is a survey class that covers U.S. literary writing from the post-Civil War era to the present. Though we will focus on canonical literary works, we will also be looking at some less canonical, emergent writers toward the end of the semester. We will examine major literary movements such as realism, modernism and post-modernism. We will also look at social and political contexts—including Reconstruction and its failure, turn-of-the-century immigration, the World Wars, the Great Migration, New Social Movements—and their relation to broad literary movements and particular literary texts. By the end of the semester, I expect you to have a good grasp of literary time periods, historical contexts, and close reading techniques.


ENG 300.01 Advanced Composition
Fulfills Adolescence Education certification requirement

CRN #5439
2:30 - 1:45 p.m.   T R
Dr. Alissa Karl
LAB


ENG 303.01 Introduction to Literary Analysis

CRN #5435
10:10 - 11:00 a.m.   M W F
Dr. Miriam Burstein    
Location: TBD

This course offers students a "toolkit" for close reading. We will work with multiple genres—poetry, fiction, drama, film—and practice the skills necessary for analyzing and appreciating each. Among other things, students will practice basic poetic scansion, learn what constitutes different genres, and develop a working knowledge of critical vocabulary. This is a hands-on course, not a lecture: students should come prepared for in-class discussion and regular exercises. Readings include extensive poetry selections; Shakespeare's Hamlet; Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead; John Updike's Gertrude and Claudius; and Scott G. F. Bailey's The Astrologer. Three essays, midterm, final, group oral presentation.


ENG 303.02 Introduction to Literary Analysis

CRN #5436
2:00 – 3:15 p.m.   T R
Dr. Alissa Karl    
Location:  TBD


ENG 303.03 Introduction to Literary Analysis

CRN #5437
12:20 - 1:10 p.m.   M W F
Dr. Gregory Garvey
Location: TBD

Aristotle divided literature into three forms: lyric, in which one voice speaks; dramatic, in which two or more voices speak back and forth; and narrative, which combines the first two. This course will draw on these distinctions to introduce methodological and theoretical approaches to literary analysis. In it, you will develop sophisticated reading and analytical skills by practicing the close reading of a small set of texts. In both its writing and discussion components, the focus of this course is the practice of literary interpretation--how to analyze a text to develop an interpretation and how to explain it to others once we have clarified our own understanding. We will read examples of major literary genres—short stories, a novel, poetry, and plays--and study methods of interpreting and explaining our understanding of these literary forms. In addition to developing writing and explanatory skills through close reading and presentation, we will study and apply theories of how literature can be understood from different intellectual points of view. We will explore theoretical perspectives such as Psychoanalytic reading, Gender analysis, Race analysis, and Historical analysis.


ENG 303.04 Introduction to Literary Analysis

CRN #5438
9:30 – 10:45 a.m.   T R
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot    
LAB

This course will introduce you to the skills you will need to read and analyze literature. Along the way, it should also help you develop your vocabulary and enable you to open your mind to new thoughts and new ways of expressing those thoughts. We will focus on four genres of literature: the short story, the novel, poetry, and drama. You will learn how to read closely and to consider the relationship between elements of a short story/novel/poem/play and the text as a whole, as well as a work's relationship to cultural and historical contexts. We will consider not only the form and structure of a work, but also how that form and structure relate to the more abstract philosophical ideas that the work conveys. You will also learn about different critical approaches to reading literature and will develop your own critical voice.


ENG 304.01 Fiction Workshop

CRN #5423
3:30 - 4:45 p.m.   T R
Dr. Anne Panning  
LAB

Prerequisite:  English 210 or permission of instructor.  In this class, students will study the craft, artistry, and vocabulary of writing fiction.  In addition to reading a wide variety of published work (mostly short stories), students will produce 2 short stories of their own.  Many class sessions will be devoted to workshops in which student stories will be discussed and critiqued by the class as a whole.  Course grade will be determined by the quality of short stories, criticism of student work submitted, a short critical paper, and participation.  This course is limited to 18 students and fills quickly, so please register immediately if you've had the prerequisite and know you need the course.


ENG 304.02 Fiction Writers Workshop

CRN #6732
1:25 - 2:15 p.m.   M W F
Dr. James Whorton
LAB

This is an intermediate course in fiction writing.  We will study stories by Anton Chekhov and Alice Munro, among others.  Each student will write two short stories to be discussed in the workshop.  Written critiques will be due at every meeting, and revised stories will be due at the end of the semester.  Prerequisite: ENG 210.

Required text: Strunk and White.  The Elements of Style.  4th ed.  Allyn & Bacon, 1999.  ISBN 0-205-31342-6


ENG 305.01 Poetry Writer's Workshop

CRN #5433
3:30 - 4:45 p.m.   R (HYB)
Dr. Stephen Fellner    
Location: TBD

Often creative writing classes become bogged down in perfunctory affirmation and rote criticisms.  A key component in this class will be developing a heightened awareness of the ways in which texts are evaluated, discussed.  Through intensive self-reflection and conversation, we will challenge and find alternatives to the myth of the creative writer as someone whose sole goal is "to fully express himself" in seclusion, battling inner demons and the worthless society that fails to understand his Art.  Even though the class will ultimately settle into a workshop format., readings will be intensive, emphasizing texts that present the readers with distinct formal challenges.  Students will be required to turn in two portfolios that best exploits their talents, needs.

Because the best ways to improve as a writer are to read, to write, and to revise, this course will focus heavily on all three of these activities.  It is my strong belief that reading and writing with passionate regularity (and irregular passion) are the best ways to grow as a writer, so the reading for this course will be extensive.

The writing workshop requires much from each writer in order to be successful.  Participation is crucial to success (both academic and artistic) in the course.  We will discuss the ins and outs of workshop at length, but at this point, I want you all to feel welcome and free in this course to express yourselves, and to remind you that in order to create the comfortable atmosphere conducive to a superlative workshop experience, we must all follow a high set of standards, both of preparedness and of courtesy.


ENG 305.02 Poetry Writer's Workshop

CRN #5434
3:35 - 4:50 p.m.   M W
Dr. Ralph Black
LAB

English 305 is a seminar designed to study and practice the art and craft of poetry writing, its uses, methods, and traditions. My assumption is that, though you may not be widely read or practiced in poetry writing, you have had some experience as readers and writers of poetry (in ENG 210, and in various literature courses). I assume that you are serious about the commitment that any serious art form demands. Much of our time will be spent reading and discussing your own poems (some written in response to particular assignments, others written from deeper kinds of necessity). A variety of writing assignments ("creative" and critical) will get you writing regularly, and rethinking your assumptions about what poetry is, what it's for, how it functions, etc. Grades based on a portfolio of revised poems, a critical paper, presentations and quizzes.


ENG 319.01 Comparative Literature: Crossings
Meets the World Literature requirement

CRN #6733
11:00 - 12:15 p.m.   T R
Dr. Sharon Lubkemann Allen
LAB

Any comparative study of literature involves the critic's crossing—between texts, geo-cultural and/or critical contexts, and so on. In this course, we cross-examine texts themselves concerned with crossings, with literal, linguistic, and literary transgressions, transpositions, and transformations. While we will try to understand these texts partly in terms of their discrete cultural contexts, our comparative inquiry will be focused on close reading of the text. The scope of our understanding will be both broadened and refined by examining texts crossing between different cultural geographies and genres, through layered critical lenses.

Our writing about strangers and the sense of estrangement in these strange literary texts is aimed at cultivating the creative and critical capacities inherent in defamiliarization and dialogue. My hope is that the dislocations that render our own language relative will generate more reflexively critical, nuanced and insightful analyses. More aware of discursive conventions because of our crossings between cultures and discourses, we refine our capacities to communicate and create. We recognize ourselves in Soyinka's description of the writer in his essay on Rushdie: "a creature in a permanent state of exile" crossing frontiers in the real world through re-orientations in language and imagination.

The texts we read are aligned up to allow us to explore particular literary motifs and methods with increasing sophistication, nuance, critical self-awareness and insight. We begin with short fiction and "non-fictional" essays on outsideness by Rawet, Bakhtin, Brodsky, and Aciman, then turn to Khrzhanovsky's film A Room and a Half as bridge between fiction and non-fiction, cinematic documentary and fiction, reading it as both adaptation of Brodsky's memoir and as Khrzhanovsky's own cultural autobiography and film essay on aesthetics. The central motifs we consider here include the relation between language and landscape (literal and literary), boundaries of genre and cultural geography. We read these short texts closely in order to understand not only different dimensions, but also dynamics of memory (cultural and personal memory, intertextual memory, etc.). As we learn to navigate these texts, we chart our course by learning to recognize discrete literary structures, strategies, devices. We refine our capacity to navigate with these tools as we read longer, more complex texts.

The second section of the course turns to novels and non-fictional narratives by Hoffman, Makine, Bouraoui and Yang, concerned with coming of age caught between worlds and words, landscapes and languages, cultural geographies and speech genres. In the third section of the course, we look at works that retrace crossings in the context of cultural ruptures and that disrupt generic conventions. In works by Sis, Kundera, and Satrapi, we critically consider the relation between art, music, and writing, both as these structure consciousness within the texts and as they structure the texts. Our fourth section concerns modes and limits of reconfiguration, re-invention, regeneration in works by Barreto, Sant'Anna, Ulitskaya, and Agualusa. In the fifth part of the course, we consider films by Akerman, Kieslowski, Kogut, and Costa, comparing these with fiction by Antunes—works concerned with return, resonances, response and responsibility, re-mapping and re-casting cultural memory, revenge and reconciliation. Finally, we read and pursue a creative and critical project concerned with the traces left on people, things, books in their crossings.


ENG 322.01 Victorian Childhood
Meets the British after 1800 requirement

CRN #6743
1:25 - 2:15 p.m.   M W F
Dr. Miriam Burstein
LAB

To a very real extent, the ideal of childhood as we know it—a time of play, innocence, and freedom from physical labor—emerged during the nineteenth century. However, as the Victorians themselves frequently mourned, nineteenth-century childhoods all too often failed to conform to that utopian narrative. This course introduces students to the multiple and often deeply conflicted ways in which the Victorians imagined childhood, drawing on works created both for and about children.   In particular, students will analyze how the Victorians understood childhood voice and agency—the possibility, that is, that children could actively shape and reshape not just their domestic environments, but also the nation and, perhaps, even the empire. Readings include Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland; Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist; Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown's Schooldays; Charles Kingsley, The Water-Babies; andRudyard Kipling, Kim. Two papers, midterm, final, individual and group presentations.


ENG 323 Shakespeare History & Tragedies
Meets the British before 1800 requirement

CRN #6517
10:10 - 11:00 a.m.   M W F
Dr. Michael Slater
Location: TBD

This course introduces students to Shakespearean drama by focusing on genres of History and Tragedy. We will develop skills of close reading and analysis through focused discussion and reading of key passages in class. Students will also be introduced to relevant early modern historical and cultural contexts, including theories of drama, humanism, political theology, sovereignty, ethics, Renaissance medicine and physiology, and other philosophical issues taken up by Shakespeare.


ENG 324.01 Shakespeare: Comedies & Romances
Meets the British before 1800 requirement

CRN #5476
3:30 - 4:45 p.m.   T R
Dr. Brooke Conti    
LAB

While the popularity of many authors has risen and fallen over the years, the works of William Shakespeare have remained a central part of English and American culture for centuries. However, while we generally expect an educated person to be familiar with his plays, Shakespeare's works are more than elite cultural touchstones: they are lively and compelling tales of love and death, heroism and deceit, sex and intrigue. This semester we will read ten of Shakespeare's plays, chosen from among his comedies and romances. We will be focusing especially on plays that involve negotiating and coping with loss—whether that loss is the result of death, exile, romantic failure, or simply growing up. Because these are comedies rather than tragedies, most of these plays have some kind of happy ending, but none of them ignores or allows us to forget the losses that mark even the most contented lives.

By focusing on these two genres, we will gain a more detailed and in-depth understanding of some of the issues and themes central to Shakespeare's works. Throughout the semester we will be considering these plays as both literary and performance texts, with some attention also to the works' original context and staging. Although such background is essential, our primary focus will be on the poetic, thematic, and dramatic elements that cause these plays to resonate so profoundly even today.

Requirements: two essays, a midterm, a final, weekly quizzes, and occasional homework assignments. Regular attendance and participation essential.


ENG/WMS 348.01 Sex and Gender in Literary Theory

CRN #5477
3:30 - 4:45 p.m.   T R
Dr. Megan Obourn
LAB

This course provides an advanced introduction to the traditions of literary theory and criticism related to sex and gender studies. We will closely analyze primary theoretical material as well as literature in relation to theories of gender and sexuality. The course is organized according to the "school" of criticism or theory that each of our critics works within. Most gender and sexuality theories draw on multiple schools of thought; be prepared to see overlaps in critics' approaches. Though theories of sex and gender have a long, complex and international history, we will focus on selected contemporary critical approaches largely by authors from Europe and the Americas. We will touch on sex and gender criticism in relation to structuralist, post-structuralist, psychoanalytic, queer, intersex, Marxist, critical race, postcolonial, and disability theory. This is not an exhaustive list but does cover many of the main schools of contemporary critical thinking about gender and sexuality.

The course includes both the theory itself and the applied theory: you will learn not just theoretical descriptions of gender criticism and theory, but how to use this theory in your critical thinking, reading and writing practices. To that end, we will read a novel along with some applied criticism.


ENG 366.01 Literature and Forgiveness (Honors)
Meets the World Literature requirement

CRN #6518
9:05 -9:55 a.m.   M W F
Dr. J. Roger Kurtz
LAB

Forgiveness has recently become a hot topic in a number of academic fields, and the job of this class is to explore its complexities.  We will begin by reading major literary works, such as Shakespeare's The Tempest, that feature the theme of forgiveness.  From there, the class will engage readings from antiquity to the present in various disciplines—philosophy, theology, political science, criminal justice, sociology, and psychology—to ask a series of fascinating intellectual questions about this important concept, such as: 

·         Just what is forgiveness? 
·         What is the opposite of forgiveness? 
·         Is forgiveness necessarily a virtue? 
·         What are the limits of forgiveness? 
·         Can one forgive on behalf of others? 
·         Can one forgive the dead? 
·         What does it mean to forgive oneself? 
·         What are the possibilities of forgiveness in cases of national trauma such as oppression, war or     genocide? 

As a culminating term project, students will explore the possibilities and limits of forgiveness by applying our theoretical study to contemporary, real-life situations (e.g., post-apartheid South Africa, post-genocide Rwanda, the West Nickel Mines shooting of Amish schoolchildren, the concept of amnesty in the immigration debate, the rise of restorative practices in the criminal justice system, etc.).  Extracurricular activities and events will be required.  This course is underwritten in part by an Enduring Questions grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).


ENG 367.01 Women in World Literature: Gender in a World Historical Context
Meets the World Literature requirement

CRN #5902
5:05 -6:20 p.m.   M W
Dr. Sevinc Turkkan
LAB

In David H. Hwang's play M. Butterfly, the beautiful Chinese diva and spy for the Chinese government Song Liling says: "(....) only a man knows how a woman is supposed to act" (2.7.63). Building on the explicit contradiction and implicit veracity of this statement, this semester we will read fiction and watch films to explore various representations of gender across the globe. We will begin from a position that refuses to ascribe permanent quality to the binaries among gender identities. Instead, we will consider the historical formations of colonialism, postcolonialism, and globalization in order to understand how definitions of gender shift, confront, resist, and at times endorse these formations. The fictional stories we read will give us insightful access to other times, places, and cultural formations. They will connect us to others in endless webs of memory, familiarity, error, and enmity. We will witness how uncertainties of various historical, political, and economic situations (colonialism, postcolonialism, and globalization among others) constantly threaten our attempts to form community, public or private, and entangle us in the histories of numerous others, leading to fragmentation and reconfiguration of identities. Is it not precisely because of the unstable and unpredictable nature of history, politics, and economics that we draw on stories to lend sense, unity, and dignity to our fragmented lives and times? Questions of gender, class, race, ethnicity and identity formation; discourses of difference, stereotype, Orientalism, patriarchy, conflict, and cultural communication will be inseparable from our discussions of aesthetics, language, literary influence, and narrative techniques.


ENG 374.01 Tudor & Stuart Drama: Villainy and Vice in Early Modern Theater

Meets the British before 1800 requirement
CRN #6734

12:20 - 1:10 p.m.   M W F
Dr. Michael Slater
LAB

"When you play the game of thrones, you win or you die." Sometimes, you win and you die. Circe's comment—from the well-known Game of Thrones—might work just as well as a description of Renaissance tragedy, a genre literary theorist A. D. Nuttall, in his book Why Does Tragedy Give Pleasure, provocatively labels "the game of death." Tragedy in the Renaissance, which often depicts a contest among royalty or nobles (i.e., a game of thrones), always ends in death, the stage generally cluttered with bodies at the end of the final scene. By the curtains close in Hamlet, at least nine have died—among them, two kings, a queen, and the eponymous prince. In King Lear even more die—a king, a queen, a duke, two duchesses, two earls, and a bastard son (one of the earl's), among a handful of their servants. The death tolls are just as high in plays not by Shakespeare. But if tragedy is aptly characterized as a "game of death," why does it give us pleasure? How does tragedy work, how does it compel our attention and very often our admiration? This class will examine the nature of tragedy in Tudor and Stuart drama, considering—and at times interrogating—such concepts as the "tragic hero," the "tragic flaw," "catharsis," and "recognition." In addition to several theoretical readings on tragedy (from Aristotle to Nietzsche), our investigation will be rooted in early modern plays by Kyd, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Cary, Middleton and Rowley, Webster, and Ford.


ENG 375.01 British Novel I: Adventurers, Quixotes, Lovers, and Readers: The Eighteenth-Century Novel
Meets the British before 1800 requirement

CRN #5903
2:00 - 3:15 p.m.   T R
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot
LAB

This is a course about how adventure, romance, imagination, and the figure of the reading character helped to develop the form of the novel throughout the eighteenth century. In this course we will study the development of the early British novel, from Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, and Charlotte Lennox, to Ann Radcliffe's Gothic novel A Sicilian Romance and Jane Austen's response to her in Northanger Abbey. We will focus on the impact that ideas about adventure, romance, and the quixotic character had on the early British novel (quixotic characters are those who are idealistic and incorrectly apply the novels or other materials they read to real-world circumstances). We will consider the historical context of the novels, the issues of class, gender, race, and ethnicity that they bring to the forefront, and the ways that we should or should not see the growth of the novel in the eighteenth century as a narrative often labeled "the rise of the novel."


ENG 381.01 Origins of American Popular Culture
Meets the American before 1900 Requirement

CRN #6519
10:10 – 11:00 a.m.   M W F
Dr. Gregory Garvey
Location:  TBD

This course examines the emergence of quick rise to dominance of mass produced entertainment between the 1790s and the American Civil War. Far from being a weak shadow of the high culture we associate with museums and elite concert halls, popular culture has always been a vital site for debating issues in the culture—femininity, masculinity, equality of opportunity in work and education. In the period we are studying, popular culture did much to advocate the end of slavery and to launch the struggle for equal rights in both economic and gender. In particular we will focus on three forms in which early American popular culture asserted itself. First, we will address the way popular texts worked to define identities for people in a changing society; second, we will explore popular culture as a forum for expressing taboo desires; and third, we will explore the emergence of popular culture as a political force for social reform.


ENG 385.01 Literature and Culture of the Jazz Age
Meets the American after 1900 Requirement

CRN #6520
10:10 – 11:00 a.m.   M W F
Dr. Jennifer Haytock
LAB

The course examines the "Jazz Age," a term coined by F. Scott Fitzgerald to designate the 1920s as a rowdy decade of parties and creative energy. Our goal is to investigate the cultural context of literary production during these years. What kind of art was produced by a decade marked by innovations in music, advancements for women and African Americans, anti-immigrant sentiment, advertising, and consumerism? How did changing understandings of relationships between men and women figure into, or grow out of, 1920s literature? Our study will take us through issues of race, gender, and class.

Fictional readings will be supplemented by historical material such as advertisements, jazz lyrics, and films as well as contemporary arguments on bobbed hair, consumerism, birth control, and the "companionate marriage." We will take "literature" as our text and cultural artifacts as our context—at least to start.

Readings may include novels, stories, and poems by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Anita Loos, Edith Wharton, Dashiell Hammett, John Dos Passos, Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Claude McKay, and others. Assignments include two formal essays, a group presentation, and a final exam.


ENG 443.01 Beauty and Performance: Black Women's Writing
Meets the American after 1900 requirement

CRN #6807
3:35 – 4:50 p.m.   M W
Dr. Althea Tait
Location: TBD

Beauty has been a topic of interest for ages. Theories of Aesthetics and beauty have existed as earlier as the writings of St. Augustine of Hippo. Perhaps some of the most pronounced theories have come from philosophical discourses. One of the most important contributions from philosophers is the debate revolving around whether or not beauty is natural and, furthermore, whether or not it is a quality we were born to innately perceive? Because of these problematic and complex debates, many questions have been raised in the discourse on beauty: who has the power to define beauty? How have people over the ages used dominant definitions to interpret beauty? Can beauty be abused or used to control other people of other races and cultures? The latter question holds great importance for this class, as we will seek to uncover the ways in which beauty has been an instrument to colonize Black women in a culture where beauty is power; and where there is power, there is often abuse. As such, this course examines the historical and contemporary abusive beauty norms for Black women. Considering the epitomized position Black women hold in the beauty discourse, we will use their political location as a space to examine the issues revolving around beauty as they pertain to all women.

The course will consist of reading the literary works of Black women whose novels/plays/poetry have served as tools of intervention for readers. Additionally, we will cover the necessary theoretical works pertaining to the discourse. Because of the cultural studies influence on the course we also will screen films/documentaries and examine advertisements from key time periods as we seek answers to questions such as: how does race influence theories of beauty? How does race affect cultural norms? How does a Eurocentric gaze affect beauty norms? How does the male gaze affect African American women’s ideals of beauty? Is the white male gaze much different than that of a Black male? Is there a Black female gaze? Do Black women subject themselves to standards of beauty imposed by a sub-community of Black women? Is there a female gaze in general? Are women so weak to be controlled by destructive beauty norms? And finally, where do women go from here?

 
ENG 472.01 Border Crossings: (Re)Visionary Story & History, Fiction & Documentary
CRN #5759
2:00 - 3:15 p.m.   T R
Dr. Sharon Lubkemann Allen
Location: TBD

This senior seminar explores geo-cultural and generic border crossings in contemporary literature, art, and film—critically reconsidering and creatively re-imagining boundaries between documentary and fiction, story and history, verbal and visual representation. Our comparative scope is focused on 20th–21st-century works by eccentrics, exiles, emigrés, immigrants and migrants, i.e. by culturally displaced, digressive, and often dissenting writers, film directors and artists. Through historically contextualized and theoretically informed close comparative readings, independent research, incisive analysis in dialogue with current scholarship, creative response and self-critical reflection, we engage the work of writers ranging from Brodsky to Hemon and Agualusa, filmmakers from Tarkovsky to Akerman and Kogut, artists from Chagall and Kandinsky to Geiger and Varejão. Bearing in mind Makine's claim, "as soon as one begins to write, one becomes a stranger [or foreigner]. Literary language is always a foreign language," we confront what may seem alien and sometimes alienating, disarming and disorienting literary, cinematic, and artistic discourses. We try to understand how their various modes of "defamiliarization" and "deterritorialization" provoke aesthetic and political reorientation, response and responsibility. As we navigate these texts, we try to refine our own trajectories as readers, writers, scholars, artists, thinkers, and fellow human beings.


ENG 472.02 Milton and Revolution

CRN #5478
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.   T
Dr. Brooke Conti
LAB

This class will focus on the life and works of John Milton. One of England's greatest writers and most radical thinkers, Milton lived during a particularly turbulent period of British history and his works are inseparable from the controversies and opportunities of that age. We will study Milton's career in a largely chronological fashion, beginning with his early poems and selections from his daring defenses of divorce, freedom of speech, and political revolution. Most of the semester, however, will be spent on the products of his later years: Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. For literary and historical context, we will also be reading works by contemporaries such as Thomas Hobbes and Samuel Pepys, as well as numerous works of 20th-century literary criticism.

Because this is a senior capstone seminar, it will culminate in a substantial independent research paper. I will assume that all of you have had some prior exposure to Renaissance literature (at least in the form of a Shakespeare class) and some prior exposure to poetry and the language of formal poetics, but you do not need to start the semester as experts in those areas—or even having read anything by Milton. This course is structured to give you everything you need. It is designed to build up to the final research paper, with earlier assignments and in-class work to allow you to review the component skills necessary for that project: there will be a short close-reading essay, to make sure that you're comfortable discussing poetry in formal terms; a short critical essay on a work of literary scholarship, to make sure you can extract the main ideas and engage with them in a meaningful way; and a prospectus and annotated bibliography for the final paper which you will submit before you begin working on that project, so I can give you detailed feedback.

Although we will be focused on understanding Milton in his original literary and historical context, along the way I think you'll find that, although Milton is often considered the second greatest writer of the English Renaissance (after Shakespeare), he actually speaks more immediately than almost any British writer to present-day America and our most urgent political, religious, and intellectual concerns.


ENG 479.01 Linguistics

CRN #5479
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.   W
Ms. Sasha Eloi
LAB


ENG 482.01 Children's Literature: The Family Dynamics of Dynamic Families

CRN #5426
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.   W
Dr. Megan Norcia
LAB          

Readings in this course will investigate family dynamics across a broad range of texts from picture books to poems and novels. We will explore how family structures create both opportunities and challenges for characters from the nineteenth- to the twenty-first centuries. In examining representations of nuclear families, adoptive families, and families fractured by grief and loss, we will consider the political and social contexts in which the texts were written. The goals of this course are to increase students' familiarity with the rich history of children's literature; to help readers gain an understanding of "childhood" as an eighteenth-century construct, and to study the ways in which this construct has been amended, altered, and revised in a contemporary context. Students will develop a facility for thinking and writing about seemingly simple literature, and will craft detailed arguments supported by evidence from the texts. Though this is not a methods course, those who do work with, care for, supervise, and play with children are encouraged to bring their experiences and insights to our discussions. Our mission will be to investigate how childhood and the child are represented in texts written for them by adults


ENG 482.61 Children's Literature: Money Matters

CRN #5428
Dr. Megan Norcia
SLN

The course reading will be guided by the questions: does money matter in children's literature and to child characters? We will evaluate how much money matters in relation to the resources, skills, or personal relationships that the child characters leverage in order to achieve their goals. How do child characters fare in the marketplace when beset by enchanted shoes, goblins vendors, or tempting goods in shop windows? We will also consider the differences between Britain and America and the distinctions drawn between those who hustle for money blacking shoes on the streets versus those whose wealth is inherited. We will examine a range of texts, from fairy tales, poems, and short stories to novels in order to develop an understanding of how money matters, and how it is represented in tales written for child audiences. The goals of this course are to increase students' familiarity with the rich history of children's literature; to help readers gain an understanding of "childhood" as an eighteenth-century construct, and to study the ways in which this construct has been amended, altered, and revised in a contemporary context. Students will develop a facility for thinking and writing about seemingly simple literature, and will craft detailed arguments supported by evidence from the texts. Our mission will be to investigate how childhood and the child are represented in texts written for them by adults. Though this is not a methods course, those who do work with, care for, supervise, and play with children are encouraged to bring their experiences and insights to our discussions.

**This course meets entirely online; there will be no face-to-face meetings.


ENG 484.01 Young Adult Literature:
Race, Gender, Sexuality and Adolescent Transformations
CRN #5429
3:30 - 4:45 p.m.   T R
Dr. Kristen Proehl
LAB

Covering texts ranging from Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women (1868) to Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis(2000), this course will explore some of the major themes, issues, and conventions of young adult literature.  We will focus principally upon the coming-of-age narrative and texts that interrogate, establish, and disrupt its conventions.   Drawing upon secondary readings in critical race studies, the history of childhood, and feminist and queer theory, we will discuss related issues of censorship, social criticism, and the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class in YA literature.  Our readings will include literature marketed to adolescent audiences, as well as texts that are frequently assigned at the middle-and high-school levels.  Key texts may include Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, John Knowles’s A Separate Peace, J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Fellowship of the Ring, Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage, Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, and Suzanne Collins’s The Hunger Games, among others.  Collectively, we will work to understand and develop our own definitions of key terms for this course, such as “adolescence,” “fantasy,” “realism,” “dystopian fiction,” and others.  Through writing assignments, class discussions, research, and close analysis exercises, this course will also further enhance your critical reading, writing, and communication skills. 


ENG 484.02 Young Adult Literature:
Race, Gender, Sexuality and Adolescent Transformations
CRN #5703
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.   R
Dr. Kristen Proehl
LAB

Same as above.

ENG 485.01 Professional & Technical Writing
CRN #6521
3:35 - 4:50 p.m.   M W
Dr. Janie Hinds
LAB

Builds on the close reading and critical thinking skills of Humanities students to strengthen detail-oriented, audience-driven written documents, both print and electronic, appropriate to expectations in a variety of workplaces. For Humanities majors.

The authors of Research Strategies in Technical Communication define some of the features of and skills necessary for productive research in a professional environment; the general objectives of this course are to hone and foster these attributes:

• Curiosity: to learn more, to discover why—or why not, to follow up on questions, to ask new questions, to wonder.

• Interest in detail: to document everything, to work methodically, to check facts, and to discern among facts, theories, hypotheses, and opinions.

• Ability to see trends: to envision the future, to anticipate needs, and to take the next step.

• Awareness of audience: to understand needs and expectations, to empathize, to assist, and to plan what needs to be done next.

• Critical thinking: to look as objectively as possible, to verify, to support, to analyze, to criticize, to evaluate, and to think logically.

• Innovative thinking: to look as creatively as possible, to try something new, to try something different, and to make connections among ideas.

• High ethical standards: to expect logical, honest, and collaborative work from yourself and others; to credit others' work; and to conduct safe and appropriate research.  (Porter and Coggin, 8)

 Specifically, this course will require students to:

• Conduct thorough research appropriate to a variety of professional work assignments.

• Summarize and evaluate sources clearly and professionally.

• Tailor written and oral presentation products, print and electronic, to appropriate audiences.

• Integrate source materials into their own written texts and create persuasive, appropriate written and oral presentation documents.

• Work collaboratively with peer writers and research sources in honest, ethical research, writing, and oral presentation.

• Practice drafting, revising, and editing to produce grammatically and structurally coherent written and oral presentation texts.


ENG 491.01 Advanced Fiction Writers Workshop

CRN #5704
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.   M
Dr. James Whorton
LAB

This is an advanced course in fiction writing.  We will study short stories by a variety of contemporary writers, and each student will write two short stories to be discussed in the workshop and one book review.  Written critiques will be due at every meeting, and revised stories will be due at the end of the semester.  Prerequisites: ENG 305 (Poetry Workshop) and ENG 304 or 306 (Fiction or Nonfiction Workshop).  Email jwhorton@brockport.edu for permission to enroll.

Required text: Strunk and White.  The Elements of Style.  4th ed.  Allyn & Bacon, 1999.  ISBN 0-205-31342-6


ENG 493.01 Advanced Literary Nonfiction

CRN #6523
2:00 - 3:15 p.m.   T R
Dr. Anne Panning
LAB

This course is a creative writing workshop, and in it you will be writing creative nonfiction, which can take on the form of memoir, literary journalism, journalism, travel narratives, and reviews. There will be an on-going discussion as to the nature of the contemporary essay and the basic obligations of a nonfiction writer.  Each student will also write a review essay on a book-length work of nonfiction. 


ENG 495.01 Writer's Craft

CRN #5446
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.   W
Dr. Ralph Black
B0005 Cooper/LAB

Writer's Craft is a literature course.  We will focus on matters of "craft"--those decisions a writer makes in order to shape a poem or story or essay in a particular way.  This might include questions about voice, imagery, perspective, form, subject, diction, etc. The course will explore distinctions in genre--with special attention to the craft of fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction--and we will strive to understand why the writer chose a particular genre for a particular material.  We will read the work of those writers who will appear as part of The Writer's Forum reading series; we will meet briefly with those writers in order to discuss their work, again with a focus on issues of craft.  Attendance at The Writer's Forum readings is mandatory.  Students will be expected to turn in a series of short response papers to culminate in a final portfolio.  In addition, we will view and discuss a number of the interviews from the Writer's Forum Videotape Library.


FLM 250.01 Film History I

3:30 –5:30 p.m.   T R
Dr. Sidney Rosenzweig
103 Edwards

This introductory course in film studies focuses on two main areas of film studies: (1) the technical vocabulary of filmmaking and film art and (2) the basics of film history. The first considers "film language," the techniques filmmakers use to express ideas and emotions, in other words, to create "meaning." The second looks at some major film movements, genres, and directors, concentrating on Classical Hollywood Cinema (American studio-made feature films from the 1930s to the mid 60s) as well as some major silent films and important foreign films. Required for Film Studies minors.


FLM 251.01 Film History, Part 2

6:30 –8:30 p.m.   T R
Dr. Sidney Rosenzweig
103 Edwards

This course traces the evolution of cinema from WWII until the present-day "blockbuster era."  Examines the major films and movements in the cross-cultural evolution of film since the emergence of the "international art cinema" in the 1950s and the New Cinemas of the 1960s. Our main focus will be on the specific history of the film industry, as well as the ways in which film reflects, responds to, and is impacted by larger events in world history (e.g., world wars, technological advances, cultural shifts, etc.).  The aim of the course is to explore the history of Hollywood and world cinema and develop the critical skills to analyze particular film works and movements.  You will learn crucial dates and time periods in the development of cinema, examine important connections and influences that exist between historically significant world film movements, and develop basic formal film analysis (i.e., "close reading") skills with which to analyze specific films and visual media texts.


FLM 301.01 Film Theory and Criticism of Film            

3:30 – 4:45p.m.   T R
Dr. Carter Soles
102 Edwards

From its inception in the late 1890s through the current impacts of digital technology, film as a medium has always been subject to intense scrutiny and inquiry regarding its meanings, aesthetics, and social effects. This course will offer an overview of many of these debates, examining how film scholars and cultural critics have approached the interpretation of film (and other popular media). This class, therefore, will introduce you to the key terms, ideas, and discourses within the theory and criticism of film as a medium. Focusing primarily on film studies as an academic discipline, this course will offer you a set of interpretative tools and analytical frameworks not only for your future academic study of film but for your everyday consumption of film and other visual media. We will pay particular attention to the application of theory and criticism: how do you take the broad ideas of theory and use them in your own interpretations? How do you take the specific interpretations of criticism and develop a broader argument that can be applied to other texts? To that end, we will examine both historically significant films as well as more contemporary films in our examination of film and its ideological meaning(s).


FLM 360.01 Film Noir

6:30 – 7:45 p.m.   T R
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.   R
Dr. Carter Soles
Location: TBD

Film noir is an incredibly multivalent and slippery term that is used to describe a style or mode that is prevalent across many historical and contemporary media forms and genres. According to James Naremore, "film noir has become one of the dominant intellectual categories of the late twentieth century, operating across the entire cultural arena of art, popular memory, and criticism" (2). Using Naremore's rigorously historicist book on film noir, More Than Night, as our guide, we will explore the historical and theoretical parameters of film noir, thereby addressing fundamental questions about the formation of film genres, the role of the critic in the creation of film history, and the complex process of film reception. We will view many of the most "canonical" films noir, all the while questioning the concept of "film noir" as a post facto interpretive/generic category imposed by critics and film audiences. In addition to readings from Naremore and classic essays on film noir from The Film Noir Reader, we will also do formal "close readings" of the films in order to test how the texts themselves reflect both the cultural concerns of their day and "noir-ness" in general.

 


 

 

 Fall 2014 Graduate Course Descriptions

 

ENG 579.01 Linguistics              
CRN #5480
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.   W
Ms. Sasha Eloi
Location:  TBD

ENG 582.01 Children's Literature: The Family Dynamics of Dynamic Families            
CRN #5427
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.   W
Dr. Megan Norcia
LAB

Readings in this course will investigate family dynamics across a broad range of texts from picture books to poems and novels. We will explore how family structures create both opportunities and challenges for characters from the nineteenth- to the twenty-first centuries. In examining representations of nuclear families, adoptive families, and families fractured by grief and loss, we will consider the political and social contexts in which the texts were written. The goals of this course are to increase students' familiarity with the rich history of children's literature; to help readers gain an understanding of "childhood" as an eighteenth-century construct, and to study the ways in which this construct has been amended, altered, and revised in a contemporary context. Students will develop a facility for thinking and writing about seemingly simple literature, and will craft detailed arguments supported by evidence from the texts. Though this is not a methods course, those who do work with, care for, supervise, and play with children are encouraged to bring their experiences and insights to our discussions. Our mission will be to investigate how childhood and the child are represented in texts written for them by adults


ENG 584.01 Young Adult Literature              

CRN #5432
3:30 – 4:45 p.m.   T R
Dr. Kristen Proehl
LAB


ENG 584.02 Young Adult Literature              

CRN #5705
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.   R
Dr. Kristen Proehl
LAB

 

ENG 585.01 Professional & Technical Writing
CRN #6522
3:35 - 4:50 p.m.   M W
Dr. Janie Hinds
LAB

Builds on the close reading and critical thinking skills of Humanities students to strengthen detail-oriented, audience-driven written documents, both print and electronic, appropriate to expectations in a variety of workplaces. For Humanities majors.

The authors of Research Strategies in Technical Communication define some of the features of and skills necessary for productive research in a professional environment; the general objectives of this course are to hone and foster these attributes:

• Curiosity: to learn more, to discover why—or why not, to follow up on questions, to ask new questions, to wonder.

• Interest in detail: to document everything, to work methodically, to check facts, and to discern among facts, theories, hypotheses, and opinions.

• Ability to see trends: to envision the future, to anticipate needs, and to take the next step.

• Awareness of audience: to understand needs and expectations, to empathize, to assist, and to plan what needs to be done next.

• Critical thinking: to look as objectively as possible, to verify, to support, to analyze, to criticize, to evaluate, and to think logically.

• Innovative thinking: to look as creatively as possible, to try something new, to try something different, and to make connections among ideas.

• High ethical standards: to expect logical, honest, and collaborative work from yourself and others; to credit others' work; and to conduct safe and appropriate research.  (Porter and Coggin, 8)

 Specifically, this course will require students to:

• Conduct thorough research appropriate to a variety of professional work assignments.

• Summarize and evaluate sources clearly and professionally.

• Tailor written and oral presentation products, print and electronic, to appropriate audiences.

• Integrate source materials into their own written texts and create persuasive, appropriate written and oral presentation documents.

• Work collaboratively with peer writers and research sources in honest, ethical research, writing, and oral presentation.

• Practice drafting, revising, and editing to produce grammatically and structurally coherent written and oral presentation texts.

ENG 595.01 Writer's Craft              
CRN #6522
6:30 – 9:15 a.m.   W
Dr. Ralph Black
219 Hartwell/B0005 Cooper

Writer's Craft is a literature course.  We will focus on matters of "craft"--those decisions a writer makes in order to shape a poem or story or essay in a particular way.  This might include questions about voice, imagery, perspective, form, subject, diction, etc. The course will explore distinctions in genre--with special attention to the craft of fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction--and we will strive to understand why the writer chose a particular genre for a particular material.  We will read the work of those writers who will appear as part of The Writer's Forum reading series; we will meet briefly with those writers in order to discuss their work, again with a focus on issues of craft.  Attendance at The Writer's Forum readings is mandatory.  Students will be expected to turn in a series of short response papers to culminate in a final portfolio.  In addition, we will view and discuss a number of the interviews from the Writer's Forum Videotape Library.


ENG 615.61 Evil in World Literature 
Meets the World Literature requirement           

CRN #6724
Dr. Austin Busch
SLN

This course explores the theme of evil in world literature through careful examination of a handful of texts from a variety of national literatures and literary traditions, ancient and modern. Two units on broad philosophical and theological themes related to the problem of evil, as it is addressed in foundational ancient literary works, lead to a pair of units focusing on more discrete manifestations of evil in world literature, in particular the evils of revenge and of genocide.  

The course has one overarching pedagogical goal, vital for students of the liberal arts in general, and of literature in particular: you will learn to analyze and interpret works of literary art with an aim toward exploring and understanding the pressing psychological, ethical, philosophical, and even theological problems these texts raise. You will hone your skills of literary interpretation, which requires at times dizzying shifts from detailed textual analysis to broad thematic and philosophical reflection.   


ENG 631.01 Contemporary British Writers   
Meets the British after 1800 requirement           

CRN #6524
5:00 – 6:15 a.m.   T R
Dr. Alissa Karl
LAB


ENG 632.01 The (Super) Natural in Early American Literature
Meets the American before 1900 requirement

CRN #5907
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.   M
Dr. Janie Hinds
LAB

This course will focus on early American writings that engage with the natural world and the supernatural world. In 17th- and 18th-century America, the differences between natural and supernatural was not delineated in the same ways they are today. Some writers considered the natural world to be the visible expression of God, the supernatural; thus, Mary Rowlandson could attribute her safe passage among her Native American captors to God's hand in the visible world. Others saw the visitation of plagues as well as crops to be bound up with this "language" of the supernatural, an attempt to communicate through the physical world, while still others, even contemporaries, looked to the mechanism of nature for all answers to the questions of existence, even when nature turned supernaturally cruel. In the 19th century, operating definitions of "natural" and "supernatural" proliferated, and frequently, what was considered natural to one would be interpreted as supernatural to another. This fact requires us to keep point of view in mind at all times.

As a seminar, the course requires both research and participation; much of the participation involves discussion of individual and collective research. Though research is performed alone, it is fundamentally a "group" experience: its purpose is to "converse," albeit slowly, with others interested in your research field. The "field" (or audience) for this class and your research projects includes others in the class and scholars who have published and/or are now publishing in Early American Literature.


ENG 690.01 Advanced Writing in the Discipline              

CRN #5909
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.   R
Dr. Megan Obourn
Location: TBD

This course is designed to acquaint graduate students with common research and writing practices in the disciplines of literary study. Students are required to practice research skills and produce annotated bibliographies and other summaries of sources. Written projects also include book reviews and peer reviews, abstracts, letters of transmittal, a conference-length paper and an article-length paper. The article-length paper is developed from a paper written from a course already completed.


ENG 691.01 Prose Workshop              

CRN #5910
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.   T
Dr. Anne Panning
LAB


ENG 697.01 Advanced Project              

CRN #5570
Dr. Janie Hinds
TBA

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Updated 5/15/14