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Department of English

Spring 2015 Advising Guides for English Majors

Majors reservation week is November 3 - 7.  English majors, see your advisor that week to sign up early for Spring 2015 English classes.  

Literature Concentration Advising Guide

Creative Writing Concentration Advising Guide

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Graduate Course Descriptions

Professor Stefan Jurasinski is away from Brockport on research leave.  If he is your advisor, you have been assigned a temporary advisor for this year.  Check the bulletin board in the English Department office or email jwhorton@brockport.edu.  

 


 

Literature Track Advising Guide,  Spring 2015

Literary Analysis  

ENG

303.01

Intro to Literary Analysis

MWF

2.30-3.20

Busch, Austin

ENG

303.02

Intro to Literary Analysis

MWF

1.25-2.15

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

303.03

Intro to Literary Analysis

W

6.30-9.15

Conti, Brooke

ENG

303.04

Intro to Literary Analysis

TR

2.00-3.15

Slater, Michael

Shakespeare  

ENG

323.01

Shakespeare Histories and Tragedies

TR

9.30-10.45

Slater, Michael

ENG

324.01

Shakespeare Comedies and Romances

MW

3.35-4.50

Conti, Brooke

British Lit before 1800                                                                                                         

ENG

323.01

Shakespeare Histories and Tragedies

TR

9.30-10.45

Slater, Michael

ENG

324.01

Shakespeare Comedies and Romances

MW

3.35-4.50

Conti, Brooke

ENG

326.01

British Genres. English Essay

TR

3.30-4.45

Kerfoot, Alicia

ENG

422.01

"New Worlds" in Renaissance Lit

TR

11.00-12.15

Slater, Michael

British Lit after 1800  

ENG

231.01

British Literature II

TR

12.30-1.45

Karl, Alissa

ENG

232.01

British Short Fiction

MWF

10.10-11

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

376.01

British Novel II

MWF

12.20-1.10

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

436.01

British Modernism

T

6.30-9.15

Karl, Alissa

American Lit before 1900 

ENG

240.01

American Lit I

MWF

9.05-9.55

Hinds, Janie

ENG

329.01

Captivity and Slavery

MWF

10.10-11

Hinds, Janie

ENG

392.01

Labor & Equality

MWF

2.30-3.20

Garvey, Greg

American Lit after 1900  

ENG

235.01

Intro to Afro-American Lit

TR

2.00-3.15

Marah, John

ENG

241.01

American Lit II

MWF

2.30-3.20

Young, P.

ENG

338.01

Contemp Am Poetry

TR

12.30-1.45

Black, Ralph

ENG

386.01

African American Women Writers

 

 

 

ENG

394.01

Soldiers and Trauma

MWF

10.10-11.00

Haytock, Jennifer

World Literature  

ENG

220.01

Early World Lit

MWF

2.30-3.20

Turkkan, Sevinc

ENG

221.01

Who Wrote the Bible

MWF

12.20-1.10

Busch, Austin

ENG

223.01

Modern World Lit (Honors)

TR

11.00-12.15

Allen, Sharon

ENG

319.01

Comparative Lit

TR

2.00-3.15

Allen, Sharon

ENG

360.01

Magical Realism

MWF

9.05-9.55

Kurtz, Roger

ENG

364.01

Visions & Revisions

TR

9.30-10.45

Allen, Sharon

ENG

365.01

Confronting Death (Honors)

MW

3.35-4.50

Busch, Austin

ENG

367.01

Women in World Lit

MW

5.05-6.20

Turkkan, Sevinc

Capstone

ENG

472.01

Narrative and Human Rights

MW

3.35-4.50

Garvey, Greg

ENG

472.02

Objects in 18th Century Lit

R

6.30-9.15

Kerfoot, Alicia

Upper-division electives may be chosen from the categories above or from the following:  

ENG

300.01

Advanced Composition (Hybrid)

R

9.30-10.45

Karl, Alissa

ENG

304.01

Fiction Workshop

MWF

1.25-2.15

Whorton, Jim

ENG

304.02

Fiction Workshop

TR

12.30-1.45

Metzger, Thom

ENG

305.01

Poetry Workshop

R

3.30-4.45

Fellner, Steve

ENG

305.02

Poetry Workshop

TR

2.00-3.15

Black, Ralph

ENG

473.01

Linguistics and Second Lang. Acquisition

MWF

1.25-2.15

 

ENG

479.01

Linguistics

W

6.30-9.15

Eloi, Sasha

ENG

482.01

Children's Lit

TR

3.30-4.45

Proehl, Kristen

ENG

482.02

Children's Lit

MWF

11.15-12.05

Daniels, April

ENG

484.01

Young Adult Lit

TR

12.30-1.45

Proehl, Kristen

ENG

484.02

Young Adult Lit

R

6.30-9.15

Proehl, Kristen

ENG

491.01

Advanced Fiction Workshop

M

6.30-9.15

Whorton, Jim

ENG

492.01

Advanced Poetry Workshop

T

6.30-9.15

Black, Ralph

ENG

495.01

Writer's Craft

W

6.30-9.15

Panning, Anne

Close Reading:   ENG 304, 305, 319, 326, 329, 338

Texts and Contexts:   ENG 360, 364, 365, 367, 376, 386, 392, 394

400-level Seminar:   ENG 422, 436

 


  

Creative Writing Track Advising Guide, Spring 2015

Literary Analysis  

ENG

303.01

Intro to Literary Analysis

MWF

2.30-3.20

Busch, Austin

ENG

303.02

Intro to Literary Analysis

MWF

1.25-2.15

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

303.03

Intro to Literary Analysis

W

6.30-9.15

Conti, Brooke

ENG

303.04

Intro to Literary Analysis

TR

2.00-3.15

Slater, Michael

Introduction to Creative Writing  

ENG

210.01

Intro to Creative Writing

TR

2.00-3.15

Fellner, Steve

ENG

210.02

Intro to Creative Writing

TR

8-9.15

Metzger

ENG

210.03

Intro to Creative Writing

MW

3.35-4.50

Iuppa

ENG

210.04

Intro to Creative Writing

MW

5.05-6.20

Iuppa

ENG

210.05

Intro to Creative Writing

MWF

11.15-12.05

Cedeno, Sarah

British Literature  

ENG

231.01

British Literature II

TR

12.30-1.45

Karl, Alissa

ENG

232.01

British Short Fiction

MWF

10.10-11

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

323.01

Shakespeare Histories and Tragedies

TR

9.30-10.45

Slater, Michael

ENG

324.01

Shakespeare Comedies and Romances

MW

3.35-4.50

Conti, Brooke

ENG

326.01

British Genres. English Essay

TR

3.30-4.45

Kerfoot, Alicia

ENG

376.01

British Novel II

MWF

12.20-1.10

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

422.01

"New Worlds" in Renaissance Lit

TR

11.00-12.15

Slater, Michael

ENG

436.01

British Modernism

T

6.30-9.15

Karl, Alissa

American Literature  

ENG

235.01

Intro to Afro-American Lit

TR

2.00-3.15

Marah, John

ENG

240.01

American Lit I

MWF

9.05-9.55

Hinds, Janie

ENG

241.01

American Lit II

MWF

2.30-3.20

Young, P.

ENG

329.01

Captivity and Slavery

MWF

10.10-11

Hinds, Janie

ENG

338.01

Contemp Am Poetry

TR

12.30-1.45

Black, Ralph

ENG

386.01

African American Women Writers

 

 

 

ENG

392.01

Labor & Equality

MWF

2.30-3.20

Garvey, Greg

ENG

394.01

Soldiers and Trauma

MWF

10.10-11.00

Haytock, Jennifer

World Literature  

ENG

220.01

Early World Lit

MWF

2.30-3.20

Turkkan, Sevinc

ENG

221.01

Who Wrote the Bible

MWF

12.20-1.10

Busch, Austin

ENG

223.01

Modern World Lit (Honors)

TR

11.00-12.15

Allen, Sharon

ENG

319.01

Comparative Lit

TR

2.00-3.15

Allen, Sharon

ENG

360.01

Magical Realism

MWF

9.05-9.55

Kurtz, Roger

ENG

364.01

Visions & Revisions

TR

9.30-10.45

Allen, Sharon

ENG

365.01

Confronting Death (Honors)

MW

3.35-4.50

Busch, Austin

ENG

367.01

Women in World Lit

MW

5.05-6.20

Turkkan, Sevinc

Fiction or Nonfiction Workshop  

ENG

304.01

Fiction Workshop

MWF

1.25-2.15

Whorton, Jim

ENG

304.02

Fiction Workshop

TR

12.30-1.45

Metzger, Thom

Poetry Workshop  

ENG

305.01

Poetry Workshop

R

3.30-4.45

Fellner, Steve

ENG

305.02

Poetry Workshop

TR

2.00-3.15

Black, Ralph

Advanced Workshop  

ENG

491.01

Advanced Fiction Workshop

M

6.30-9.15

Whorton, Jim

ENG

492.01

Advanced Poetry Workshop

T

6.30-9.15

Black, Ralph

Writer's Craft  

ENG

495.01

Writer's Craft

W

6.30-9.15

Panning, Anne

Upper-division electives may be chosen from the categories above or from the following: 

ENG

300.01

Advanced Composition (Hybrid)

R

9.30-10.45

Karl, Alissa

ENG

472.01

Narrative and Human Rights

MW

3.35-4.50

Garvey, Greg

ENG

472.02

Objects in 18th Century Lit

R

6.30-9.15

Kerfoot, Alicia

ENG

473.01

Linguistics and Second Lang. Acquisition

MWF

1.25-2.15

 

ENG

479.01

Linguistics

W

6.30-9.15

Eloi, Sasha

ENG

482.01

Children's Lit

TR

3.30-4.45

Proehl, Kristen

ENG

482.02

Children's Lit

MWF

11.15-12.05

Daniels, April

ENG

484.01

Young Adult Lit

TR

12.30-1.45

Proehl, Kristen

ENG

484.02

Young Adult Lit

R

6.30-9.15

Proehl, Kristen

 

 



Spring 2015 Undergraduate Course Descriptions


ENG 210.01 Creative Writing
CRN #6704
2:00 – 3:15 p.m.  T R
Dr. Steven Fellner

Often creative writing classes become bogged down in perfunctory affirmation and rote criticisms.  A key component in this class will be developing a heightened awareness of the ways in which texts are evaluated, discussed.  Through intensive self-reflection and conversation, we will challenge and find alternatives to the myth of the creative writer as someone whose sole goal is "to fully express himself" in seclusion, battling inner demons and the worthless society that fails to understand his Art.  Even though the class will ultimately settle into a workshop format readings will be intensive, emphasizing texts that present the readers with distinct formal challenges.  Students will be required to turn in two pieces that best exploits their talents, needs.

Because the best ways to improve as a writer are to read, to write, and to revise, this course will focus heavily on all three of these activities.  It is my strong belief that reading and writing with passionate regularity (and irregular passion) are the best ways to grow as a writer, so the reading for this course will be extensive.

The writing workshop requires much from each writer in order to be successful.  Participation is crucial to success (both academic and artistic) in the course.  We will discuss the ins and outs of workshop at length, but at this point, I want you all to feel welcome and free in this course to express yourselves, and to remind you that in order to create the comfortable atmosphere conducive to a superlative workshop experience, we must all follow a high set of standards, both of preparedness and of courtesy.


ENG 210.02 Creative Writing
CRN #6705
8:00 – 9:15 a.m.   T R
Mr. Thomas Metzger

ENG 210 is an introductory level course that will give students opportunities to explore poetry, and short fiction.  Besides basic writer's craft, editing and critical response will be emphasized. 


ENG 210.03 Creative Writing
CRN #6706
3:35 – 4:50 p.m.   M W
Mrs. M.J. Iuppa

This gateway course is a four genre smorgasbord that's guaranteed to whet the creative writer's appetite. Students will explore the fundamental skills of poetry, fiction, nonfiction and play writing.  For some, this creative writing workshop experience will be new– unlike any other they've experienced; while others may find this workshop an opportunity to push their writing skills further.  The course is designed around the belief that one must read widely and closely in order to write. This is an intensive writing course, meant for students who are dedicated readers and serious about the process of writing. We will examine the works of both established and emerging writers in hopes of discerning and emulating the qualities of good poetry, fiction, nonfiction and play writing. Frequent writing exercises will provide the opportunity to practice, to imitate, and to experiment. Class members will work together to create a welcoming and productive workshop, including extensive in-class discussion of both published writers and student work. Students will write four critical shorts that explore elements of writer's craft.

At the end of the semester, each student will submit a portfolio of  selected (revised) creative works.  Get ready for an all you can write semester.


ENG 210.04 Creative Writing
CRN #6707
5:05 – 6:20 p.m.  M W
Mrs. M.J. Iuppa

Same as above.


ENG 210.05 Intro. to Creative Writing
CRN #7020
11:15 – 12:05 p.m.  M W F
Mrs. Sarah Cedeno

This course will immerse you in the world of creative writing in terms of craft. We'll study short samples from contemporary literary magazines and masters of the contemporary, pairing with writing prompts that put you in action.  You'll emulate the admirable aspects of what we read while working toward your own aesthetic.

You'll visit the Writers Forum twice in the semester to witness a writer (whose work you've read and discussed) in action.

You will write, revise and workshop a piece of your choosing.  You'll engage in lively discussion about the work of your peers.  You'll come away with a new super-power, but mostly, you'll be a better reader, critic, and writer.


ENG 220.01 Early World Literature
CRN #7229
2:30 – 3:20 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Sevinc Turkkan

This course studies the epic, religious, and dramatic traditions of the ancient world from the beginnings until around 14th century of the Common Era.  The selected readings offer insights into the literary, religious, and philosophical traditions of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, showing their continuities and discontinuities among each other as well as between them and those of Europe.  We will critically examine notions such as "West" and "non-West" and will discuss the premises of cultural and civilizational differences in relation to the assigned readings. The literary heritage of the world spans five millennia of recorded history: from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, and Japan to modern times around the globe.  No single course could possibly represent the infinite magnitude of the world's literary heritage; nevertheless, we must seriously work at expanding our awareness and understanding of the world in which we live based on the literary tradition we have inherited.


ENG 221.01 Who Wrote the Bible
CRN #7902
12:20 – 1:10 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Austin Busch

Who wrote the Bible? carefully examines select Old and New Testament writings in order to answer questions of authorship.  Who wrote these books?  How do we know?  Were any based on earlier writings?  What are their literary status?  Historiography?  Pius fiction?  Liturgical or love poetry?  Letters?  Something else entirely?  How do biblical writings relate to other ancient writings?  How do all these questions relate to traditional views of scriptural inspiration held by Jews and Christians today?  How do they relate to broader philosophical questions regarding the feasibility of communication between human beings and a divine other (God)?  We will closely read a selection of biblical writings in order to discover the frequently surprising answers they offer to questions such as these.


ENG 223.01 Modern World Literature (Honors)
CRN #6752
11:00 – 12:15 p.m.  T R
Dr. Sharon Lubkemann-Allen

Urban Contexts, Urbane Consciousness, & the Making of Modern Fiction & Film

Avant-garde art, poetry, fiction and film are often peculiarly urbane constructs.  That is, they often critically represent urban contexts, refracting these through urbane consciousnesses.  As modern writers converge in such cities as London, Paris, St. Petersburg, Prague, Lisbon, Rio de Janeiro, Luanda... the discrete contours of these capitals filter into their fictions, not only as narrative setting where characters and cultural discourses collide.  The city's contours—both literal and literary (imaginary and intertextual)—also filter into form.  Avant-garde work often makes us aware of this, through its reflexive turn, foregrounding the restructuring of art, redrawing the boundaries of genres as well as re-mapping cultural geographies, reconfiguring history, etc.  Avant-garde work critically revisits commonplaces in the city and citytext, to redefine contemporary culture.

First engaging nineteenth-century works ranging from Gogol's Petersburg tales, Poe's stories, and Baudelaire's poetry to Dostoevsky's and Machado de Assis's underground narratives, we enter the twentieth century by exploring the polyphonic, haunted and hallucinatory cities of Bely's Petersburg, Pessoa's O Livro do Desassossego [The Book of Disquietude], Kafka's Der Prozes [The Trial] and "Metamorphosis",and Mário de Andrade's Pauliceia Desvairada [Hallucinated City].  With such writers as our guides, this course explores dark corners of the modern city and subject, attending to urban discourses and debates concentrated within peculiarly disrupted, divided, digressive urbane consciousness.  It explores in these and more recent works of fiction and film (by Lispector, Verrissimo, Borges, Queneau, Petrushevskaia, Tarkovsky, Saramago, Agualusa, etc.), the pressures of the modern city in cultural crisis and the capacity of the writer to arbitrate against a death sentence by reimagining the limits of the literary sentence.

This survey focuses on what Benjamin called "correspondences" between urban contexts, urbane consciousness, and forms of narrative prose, poetry, and cinema.  In particular, it follows nineteenth- and twentieth-century figures of the gamin and flaneur, the scribbler or hack writer, the copy clerk, the deviant and the detective erring in the margins of the city and the page.  Our wandering begins and ends in Paris, where we follow first old men and finally a child.  But we move far beyond this central site for discourse about modernist and postmodernist literature, turning through Lusophone fictions and films that cross between African, European and American cities, after having spent significant time wandering the streets and texts of                St. Petersburg, Prague, Lisbon, Rio de Janeiro, and São Paulo as charted in fiction, poetry, and film of the mid- to late-nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

The central questions we consider in this course include not only how urban contexts and urbane consciousness are represented in literature, but also how the city shapes writing.  What common and particular dimensions filter into the literature of discrete cities?  In what ways do discrete cities become sites of mystery, metamorphosis, memory?  How is the city read as text?  How does it figure in the construction of individual and cultural identity?  How is childhood shaped by urban life?  How does the child's perspective deform or reform the city?  How is the city understood in terms of deception, dissembling, delusion, dream and delirium, doubling and division, digression, deviance, disease, death, dissent and creativity?   Are there distinct kinds of cities (concentric and eccentric cities, for instance, as suggested by Lotman and the Tartu school of cultural semiotics; differently post-colonial cities; etc.) that might allow us to delineate distinct literary dynamics?  Are there different aesthetic implications for the native vs. the newcomer to the city?  How do the transnational, transcultural, translingual experiences of the exile, emigré, and immigrant revise the citytext?  What is the relation between gender and cultural geography?

Our discussions of texts, films, and images will revolve around our writing about them, working from the principle that our writing concentrates our critical thinking in a form that can be cultivated for more incisive interpretations of literary texts, cultural contexts, and critical perspectives.  The course envisions reading and writing as interrelated processes, open-ended and recursive.  Hence the readings and essays build on each other.  The later reading and writing assignments draw on our earlier study of literary texts and critical contexts—complicating and questioning earlier conceptions of the urban/e text, developing skills in close reading and expanding comparative contexts for literary analysis.

Visions and Revisions : Transcultural Literary Metamorphoses

Modern(ist) Novels, Postmodernist Revisions

This course explores the ways that later literature responds to (re-imagines, interrogates, critiques) classical or "classic" texts in discrete historical contexts.  In examining literary revisions, the course contends not only with shifting literary conventions, but also literary negotiations with complex cultural conditions, conflicts, and questions (concerning class, gender, race, religion, politics, etc.).  While considering transhistorical transformations, the course investigates transcultural dialogue, critically examining how cross-cultural revisions result in the transformations of literary genres, themes, perspectives on particular problems, etc.  It considers correlations between geo-cultural, genre, and gendered transformations.

Literary texts will include works by Hugo, Dostoevsky, Nabokov, Bulgakov, Petrushevskaia, Machado de Assis, Lispector, Lins, Woolf, Joyce, Cunningham, Camoes, Pessoa, Saramago, Antunes, etc.  There will also be films by Vertov, Bergman, Tarkovsky, Wenders, Monteiro, etc.

Course requirements:

Bi-weekly 2-3 page comparative critiques.

7-8 page research essay contending with the broader historical and cultural contexts for one of the "revisions," requiring critical engagement with historical sources, other literary subtexts, and a couple relevant works of literary scholarship (critical essays on the novel).

10-12 min. presentation of one cinematic "revision" addressing formal conventions, cultural context, and historical content.


ENG 231.01 British Literature II:  Sex and Money in British Literature
CRN #7021
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.  T R
Dr. Alissa Karl

In this course we'll read poems about prostitutes, stories about working women and mooching men, and a range of things in between.  Our aim will be to explore how sex and gender are related to money, class and wealth in British literature over the past 200 or so years.   Expect to read a broad range of genres (poetry, novels, essays, short fiction, and drama) that deal with the above, to discuss and write about them in essays and exams, and to think actively about how matters of sex and money work today.


ENG 232.01 British Short Fiction: Mary Shelley to Virginia Woolf
CRN #809
10:10 – 11:00 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Miriam Burstein

Thanks to magazines, newspapers, and annuals (our modern-day coffee-table books), the market for short fiction exploded in the nineteenth century.  Stand-alone short tales were distributed as tracts or chapbooks, as well as collected in volume form.  Women authors, in particular, were to the forefront in this form, as they were in novel-writing.   This course surveys the territory of the short story from the early nineteenth to the early twentieth centuries, paying particular attention to the spread of new genres (the detective story, for example).  It will emphasize women's contributions to the genre, especially as innovators in the fields of Gothic and sensation tales.  Two papers; online annotation project; exams; oral presentation.


ENG 235.01 Intro Afro-American Literature
CRN #6708
11:00 – 12:15 p.m.  T R
Dr. John Marah

An introductory survey of the literature by African Americans in the United States and about their lived-experiences in the United States.  The course will acquaint students with some of the most salient African-American classics and significant historical periods.  Issues regarding the relationship between the write and the socio-cultural and political environments and movements will be discussed.  Questions concerning the socio-cultural functions of the writers to their local and larger communities will be addressed.  This course fulfills the AAS major/minor lower division and humanities elective.


ENG 240.01 American Literature I (A,D,H)
CRN #6702
9:05 - 9:55 a.m.  M W F
Dr. Janie Hinds

Surveys texts written in or about America prior to 1870.  Will include exploration and captivity narratives, some Puritan writing, a Federalist-era novel, and major nineteenth-century authors such as Emerson, Fuller, Hawthorne, Poe, Douglass, and Stowe.


ENG 241.01 American Literature II
CRN #6703
2:30 - 3:20 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Phil Young

This course studies the epic, religious, and dramatic traditions of the ancient world from the beginnings until around 14th century of the Common Era.  The selected readings offer insights into the literary, religious, and philosophical traditions of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, showing their continuities and discontinuities among each other as well as between them and those of Europe.  We will critically examine notions such as "West" and "non-West" and will discuss the premises of cultural and civilizational differences in relation to the assigned readings. The literary heritage of the world spans five millennia of recorded history: from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, and Japan to modern times around the globe.  No single course could possibly represent the infinite magnitude of the world's literary heritage; nevertheless, we must seriously work at expanding our awareness and understanding of the world in which we live based on the literary tradition we have inherited.


ENG 300.01 Advanced Composition (fulfills Adolescence Education certification requirement)
CRN #6716
9:30 - 10:45 a.m.  R  (Hybrid)
Dr. Alissa Karl

Advanced Composition helps college writers develop skills that will be of use in upper-division courses, graduate school, and professional life.  The course is broken roughly into two (related) halves: in the first part of the semester, we will study and experiment with genre and rhetorical situation in order to become adept at decoding what kinds of writing are called for and when, and to understand what different kinds of written address imply and demand of us; in the second half, we will take a close look at different ways that effective arguments can be made, deploying both personal experience and careful research to craft successful arguments.  This is a writing-intensive course in which you will undertake substantial independent work to become a self-directed writer who is capable of making effective choices in all kinds of writing situations.


ENG 303.01 Introduction to Literary Analysis
CRN #6712
2:30 - 3:20 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Austin Busch

This course introduces the practice of literary criticism to beginning and intermediate students of literature.  We shall hone close reading skills and learn to compose sophisticated interpretive essays about the literary texts we read.  These texts will not be restricted to English and American literature as traditionally understood, but will be international in scope—works of drama, poetry, and long and short fiction from around the world and from various periods of history.  Evaluation will include essays, class participation, and attendance.


ENG 303.02 Introduction to Literary Analysis
CRN #6713
1:25 – 2:15 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Miriam Burstein

This course offers students a "toolkit" for close reading.  We will work with multiple genres—poetry, fiction, drama, film—and practice the skills necessary for analyzing and appreciating each.  Among other things, students will practice basic poetic scansion, learn what constitutes different genres, and develop a working knowledge of critical vocabulary.  This is a hands-on course, not a lecture: students should come prepared for in-class discussion and regular exercises.  Readings include extensive poetry selections; Shakespeare's King Lear; Nahum Tate's King Lear; Balzac's Père Goriot; and the Women's Theatre Group's Lear's Daughters.  Three essays; exams; quizzes; oral presentation.


ENG 303.03 Introduction to Literary Analysis
CRN #6714
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  W
Dr. Brooke Conti

This course provides an introduction to literary study and analysis organized around the theme "Life During Wartime."  We will look at poems, novels, plays, and short stories by writers such as Shakespeare, Walt Whitman and W. H. Auden, Bobbi Ann Mason and Tim O'Brien.  The goal of this course is to teach you a variety of approaches to literature—focusing especially on close-reading and the basics of poetic analysis—while at the same time developing your writing skills so that your essays become increasingly analytical and persuasive.

Requirements: four papers of varying lengths and regular quizzes and short written assignments.


ENG 303.04 Introduction to Literary Analysis
CRN #6715
2:00 – 3:15 p.m.  T R
Dr. Michael Slater

This course serves as an introduction to the tools of literary analysis, working especially, but not exclusively, on honing our close reading skills.  While texts for the class will span a wide array of genres and modes—poetry, drama, short and long fiction, and films—our focus will remain fixed primarily on the topic of "magic and monsters." To judge only from popular media, ours is a culture obsessed with the supernatural and the unnatural, with magic and monsters and creatures endowed with extraordinary abilities and powers (think Harry Potter, Twilight, or Game of Thrones).  Many of our most popular narratives evoke aberrations that, by all appearances, we find at once threatening and thrilling.  But this cultural obsession with magic and monsters is nothing new, both featuring prominently in fiction since as early as Homer.  In readings from Shakespeare to Mary Shelley to Bram Stoker and beyond, we will explore what makes a monster monstrous and why magic is so enthralling.  Along the way, we will consider the magical and the monstrous as tropes for, among other things, ambition, knowledge, sexuality, narrative form, and the aesthetic power of illusion.

Evaluation will include three essays, weekly blackboard postings, and participation.


ENG 304.01 Fiction Writers Workshop
CRN #6709
1:25 - 2:15 a.m.  M W F
Dr. James Whorton

This is an intermediate course in fiction writing.  We will study stories by Anton Chekhov and Alice Munro, among others.  Each student will write two short stories to be discussed in the workshop.  Written critiques will be due at every meeting, and revised stories will be due at the end of the semester.  Prerequisite: ENG 210.

Required text:

Strunk and White.  The Elements of Style.  4th ed.  Allyn & Bacon, 1999.  ISBN 0-205-31342-6


ENG 304.02 Fiction Workshop
CRN #6754
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.  T R
Mr. Thomas Metzger

Prerequisite: ENL 210 or instructor's permission.  We'll spend most of the time workshopping stories by members of the class.  This means close reading, written response and honest discussion.  Students without some experience with the workshop process may be at a disadvantage.

My classroom style is fairly informal and fairly aggressive.  So we'll dispense with the early semester niceties quickly and get to work on the difficult, at times painful, labor of crafting, analyzing, disassembling and rebuilding strong fiction.  This course is a Workshop requirement for Creative Writing majors.


ENG 305.01 Poetry Writers Workshop
CRN #6710
3:30 - 4:45 p.m.  R (Hybrid)
Dr. Stephen Fellner

Often creative writing classes become bogged down in perfunctory affirmation and rote criticisms.  A key component in this class will be developing a heightened awareness of the ways in which texts are evaluated, discussed.  Through intensive self-reflection and conversation, we will challenge and find alternatives to the myth of the creative writer as someone whose sole goal is "to fully express himself" in seclusion, battling inner demons and the worthless society that fails to understand his Art.  Even though the class will ultimately settle into a workshop format., readings will be intensive, emphasizing texts that present the readers with distinct formal challenges.  Students will be required to turn in two portfolios that best exploits their talents, needs.

Because the best ways to improve as a writer are to read, to write, and to revise, this course will focus heavily on all three of these activities.  It is my strong belief that reading and writing with passionate regularity (and irregular passion) are the best ways to grow as a writer, so the reading for this course will be extensive.

The writing workshop requires much from each writer in order to be successful.  Participation is crucial to success (both academic and artistic) in the course.  We will discuss the ins and outs of workshop at length, but at this point, I want you all to feel welcome and free in this course to express yourselves, and to remind you that in order to create the comfortable atmosphere conducive to a superlative workshop experience, we must all follow a high set of standards, both of preparedness and of courtesy.


ENG 305.02 Poetry Writer's Workshop
CRN #6711
2:00 - 3:15 p.m.  T R
Dr. Ralph Black

English 305 is a seminar designed to study and practice the art and craft of poetry writing, its uses, methods, and traditions.  My assumption is that, though you may not be widely read or practiced in poetry writing, you have had some experience as readers and writers of poetry (in ENG 210, and in various literature courses).  I assume that you are serious about the commitment that any serious art form demands. Much of our time will be spent reading and discussing your own poems (some written in response to particular assignments, others written from deeper kinds of necessity).  A variety of writing assignments ("creative" and critical) will get you writing regularly, and rethinking your assumptions about what poetry is, what it's for, how it functions, etc.  Grades based on a portfolio of revised poems, a critical paper, presentations and quizzes.


ENG 319.01 Comparative Literature
CRN #7904
2:00 - 3:15 p.m.  T R
Dr. Sharon Allen

"As soon as one begins to write, one becomes a stranger.  Literary language is always a foreign language."

– Andreï Makine

Any comparative study of literature involves the critic's crossing—between texts, geo-cultural and/or critical contexts, and so on.  In this course, we cross-examine texts themselves concerned with crossings, with literal, linguistic, and literary transgressions, transpositions, and transformations.  While we will try to understand these texts partly in terms of their discrete cultural contexts, our comparative inquiry will be focused on close reading of the text.  The scope of our understanding will be both broadened and refined by examining texts crossing between different cultural geographies and genres, through layered critical lenses.

Our writing about strangers and the sense of estrangement in these strange literary texts is aimed at cultivating the creative and critical capacities inherent in defamiliarization and dialogue.  My hope is that the dislocations that render our own language relative will generate more reflexively critical, nuanced and insightful analyses.  More aware of discursive conventions because of our crossings between cultures and discourses, we refine our capacities to communicate and create. We recognize ourselves in Soyinka's description of the writer in his essay on Rushdie: "a creature in a permanent state of exile" crossing frontiers in the real world through re-orientations in language and imagination.

The texts we read are lined up to allow us to explore particular literary motifs and methods with increasing sophistication, nuance, critical self-awareness and insight.  We begin with short fiction and "non-fictional" essays on outsideness by Rawet, Bakhtin, Brodsky, and Aciman, then turn to Khrzhanovsky's film A Room and a Half as bridge between fiction and non-fiction, cinematic documentary and fiction, reading it as both adaptation of Brodsky's memoir and as Khrzhanovsky's own cultural autobiography and film essay on aesthetics.  The central motifs we consider here include the relation between language and landscape (literal and literary), boundaries of genre and cultural geography.  We read these short texts closely in order to understand not only different dimensions, but also dynamics of memory (cultural and personal memory, intertextual memory, etc.).  As we learn to navigate these texts, we chart our course by learning to recognize discrete literary structures, strategies, devices.  We refine our capacity to navigate with these tools as we read longer, more complex texts.

The second section of the course turns to fictional and documentary films, novels and non-fictional narratives by Hoffman, Akerman, and Tarkovsky, concerned with coming of age and aging, caught between discrete times and places, stories and histories, chronotopes, semiospheres, worlds and words, landscapes and languages, cultural geographies and speech genres.  In the third section of the course, we look at works that retrace crossings in the context of cultural ruptures and that use those ruptures to disrupt generic conventions.  In works by Sis, Kundera, and Satrapi, we critically consider the relation between art, music, and writing, both as these structure consciousness within the texts and as they structure the texts.  Our fourth section concerns modes and limits of reconfiguration, re-invention, regeneration in works by Hemon and Agualusa.  In the fifth part of the course, we consider films by Akerman, Kieslowski, and Kogut, comparing these with fiction by Antunes—works concerned with return, resonances, response and responsiblity, re-mapping and re-casting cultural memory, revenge and reconciliation. Finally, we read and pursue a creative and critical project concerned with the traces left on people, things, books in their crossings.


ENG 323.01 Shakespeare's Histories & Tragedies
CRN #6755
9:30 - 10:45 a.m.  T R
Dr. Michael Slater

In a superb metaphor, Northrup Frye explains that "tragic heroes are so much the highest points in their human landscape that they seem the inevitable conductors of the power about them, great trees more likely to be struck by lightning than a clump of grass."  If tragic heroes are great, towering figures, perhaps none stand taller than Shakespeare's.  We tend to identify his greatest characters and plays with the tragedies—Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and King Lear, to name only a few.  Not unlike his tragedies, Shakespeare's histories also center on supremely powerful figures, usually monarchs from England's past.  Frye's characterization of the tragic hero as a central "conductor of power," in fact, appears to apply just as well to many protagonists from the histories.  In this course we will examine several of Shakespeare's tragedies and histories, paying particular attention to the social and historical conditions that helped to shape them.  We will investigate the cultural forces and practices that inform the plays, from the Petrarchan sonnet craze in the 1590s to attitudes toward the "divine right" of kings to customs of inheritance in early modern England.  But we will also consider the plays as performances within this culture, thinking about Elizabethan staging practices as well as watching several modern adaptations and productions.


ENG 324.01 Shakespeare Comedies & Romances
CRN #7905
3:35 - 4:50 p.m.  M W
Dr. Brooke Conti

This course will examine ten of Shakespeare's comedies and romances. We will consider these works as both literary and performance texts, with some attention to the works' historical context and original staging. You may also expect regular video clips, in-class performances of individual scenes, and at least one screening of a recent film adaptation in its entirety. Requirements: regular quizzes and short written assignments, two essays, a midterm, and a final exam.


ENG 326.01 Genres in British Literature:  Fashioning the Early English Essay Periodical
CRN #6864
3:30 - 4:45 p.m.  T R
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot

This course will focus on the English essay periodical, which was an early version of what we might call a literary pamphlet or newspaper today (it came out three times a week and cost a penny).  We will read selections from the most influential essay periodicals of the day: Richard Steele's The Tatler and Joseph Addison's The Spectator.  We will supplement our reading of these papers with others that copied or adapted the format of these popular periodicals (such as The Female Tatler, The Female Spectator, and The Gentleman's Magazine).  These periodical papers include commentary on fashionable spaces such as the coffeehouse and theatre, early eighteenth-century fashion and dress, credit and the economy, and on the popular consumption of all kinds of commodities.  We will also pay special attention to these papers as commodities themselves, and will consider how they use their generic format (the short essay alongside letters from readers) to market their ideas about social class and proper behavior.


ENG 329.01 Captivity & Slavery
CRN #7906
10:10 - 11:00 a.m.  M W F
Dr. Janie Hinds

Focus is on the clashes of cultures in the context of captivity and slavery.  Readings (in translation) from texts originally written in English, Spanish, and French, ranging from 1542 to 1861, from Nova Scotia to Sierra Leone.  Study of these narratives provides a broad historical and literary overview of New World literature before the Civil War.

Course will require reading of such texts as The Relation of Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca (1542); Mary Rowlandson, The Sovereignty and Goodness of God (1682); Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano (1789 ); A Narrative of the Life, Adventures, Travels & Sufferings of Henry Tufts ("Autobiography of a Criminal—Henry Tufts," 1807); and Harriet Jacobs (Linda Brent), Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861).

This course fulfills the early American literature requirement for the English major and the Diversity requirement for General Education.


ENG 338.01 Contemporary American Poetry
CRN #7907
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.  T R
Dr. Ralph Black

This course will survey developments in American poetry during the past 50+ years.  We will look at how the Modernism of the first half of the 20th-century (the work of Pound, Eliot, H.D., Williams, & Stevens) was responded to (extended, critiqued, abandoned...) by later generations of poets.  We will explore such trends and "schools" as the confessional and post-confessional lyric, New Formalism, the poetry of nature, deep imagery, narrative poetry, political poetry, gender and queer theory, performance poetry, etc.  Though we will inevitably consider poetic themes—how poets write about war, sex, nature, family, God—our focus will be more on the crafting of the poem, in the aesthetic vision evinced in a writer's work.  You can expect regular paper assignments (mostly critical, but some creative), quizzes, oral presentations, etc.


ENG 360.01 Magical Realism
CRN #7908
9:05 – 9:55 a.m.  M W F
Dr. Roger Kurtz

Magical Realism is a lively twentieth-century literary movement originating in Latin America that has catalyzed new regional literatures from around the world. It has also infused existing literary traditions with fresh zest and life.  In this class, we will read some of the major texts of magical realism, exploring its Latin American roots and its impact on contemporary world literatures.

We will read and analyze a number of magical realist texts, with specific attention to:  the dominant characteristics of magical realism as a literary movement, the relation of magical realism to the Latin American setting where it originated,how the genre of magical realism has evolved been taken up by other literary traditions, andthe relation of magical realism to other recent literary movements, particularly postmodernism and postcolonialism.


ENG 364.01 Vision/Revision
CRN #7909
9:30 - 10:45 a.m.  T R
Dr. Sharon Lubkemann-Allen


ENG 365.01 Confronting Death (Honors)
CRN #7910
3:35 - 4:50 p.m.  M W
Dr. Austin Busch

Confronting Death encourages students to consider the implications of human mortality through readings that addresses life after death, mourning and consolation, suicide, and the effects of medical advances on our understanding of death.  Readings include Greek and Roman poetic and philosophical texts (Homer, Lucretius, Plato, Seneca); religious and philosophical writings from the Buddhist, Jewish, Christian, and Islamic traditions (the Bible, Talmud, Quran; Nāgārjuna, Tertullian, Maimonides, Al-Ghazālī); a handful of European philosophical essays (Locke, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer); 19th century Russian and British narrative and poetry (Poe's "The Premature Burial," Tolstoy's The Death of Ivan Ilyich, Tenneyson's In Memoriam); and brief forays into 20th century philosophical and ethical writings (e.g. Daniel Callahan).  In the process of addressing the questions death's inevitability raises, this course encourages students to develop a coherent and personally meaningful philosophy of mortality.  A capstone assignment requires each student to articulate such a philosophy in a contextually limited manner, by drawing on the course's readings as intellectual and aesthetic tools with which to chart an approach to a single problem posed by the final fact of life: it ends.


ENG 367.01 Women in World Literature: Gender and Power in a World Historical Context
CRN #6865
5:05 -6:20 p.m.  M W
Dr. Sevinc Turkkan

In David H. Hwang's play M. Butterfly, the beautiful Chinese diva and spy for the Chinese government Song Liling says: "only a man knows how a woman is supposed to act" (2.7.63). Building on the explicit contradiction and implicit veracity of this statement, this semester we are going to read fictional, visual, and theoretical texts to explore various representations of gender across time and geography.  Besides class and race, gender is one of the most crucial categories of analyzing literary representations and historical realities.  Gender signals how power is unevenly distributed across various divides.  It is neither neutral nor self-evident but a construct with a capacity to interrupt, thwart, and reconfirm power dynamics.  We will begin from a position that refuses to ascribe permanent quality to the binaries among gender identities.  Rather, we will consider how temporal and geographical formations prescribe and define gender, and how definitions of gender shift, confront, resist, and at times endorse these formations.  The readings include texts from ancient Greece, 11th century Japan, medieval Arab world, 16th century France, and Victorian England as well as texts that address problems of postcolonial subjectivities, globalization and multiculturalism, and violences of religious hypocrisy and patriarchy across the globe.  Through close reading and analyses of texts literary or otherwise, we will consider the concept of agency, the problem of voice, the status of the subaltern subject, representations of the veil and Islam, and the relationship of texts to their social and historical contexts.  Questions of identity formation, discourses of difference, orientalism, stereotype, conflict, and cultural communication will be inseparable from how we discuss aesthetics, literary influence, and narrative techniques.


ENG 376.01 British Novel II
CRN #7911
12:20 - 1:10 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Miriam Burstein

Our survey of British fiction from the nineteenth century to the present will focus on one of the novel's most enduring topics: romance, in all its forms.  In particular, we'll think about transformations of different romantic elements—the romantic hero (or heroine), the marriage plot, the tragic (or ill-fated) romance, the romance across social classes, the fairy-tale romance, and even the anti-romance.  Readings will include Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; George Gissing, The Odd Women; Ford Madox Ford, The Good Soldier; Elizabeth Taylor, A Game of Hide and Seek; Helen Oyeyemi, Mr. Fox.  Two essays; exams; oral presentation.


ENG 386.01 African American Women Writers
CRN #
12:20 - 1:10 p.m.  M W F
TBD


ENG 392.01 Labor and Equality
CRN #7237
2:30 - 3:20 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Gregory Garvey

A living wage.  Equality for women.  Slave labor.  Wage slavery.  Workingman's rights.  Stories about people working pervade early American popular culture.  Written at a time when the United States was both a slave-holding society and an industrializing economy, this literature not only mediated gender and racial norms, it also shaped the meanings of dignity and human rights that have left long legacies in American society.  The course starts with the emergence of the factory in the agricultural landscape and works through texts by Louisa May Alcott, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Frederick Douglass, and Henry David Thoreau, among others.  It culminates with Upton Sinclair's novel about the Chicago stockyards, The Jungle.  We will take breaks from our reading to watch and study important film representations of people at work such as Charlie Chaplin's depression era film Modern Times; and Clock Watchers, a contemporary film about the psychology of young office workers.


ENG 394.01 Soldiers, Identity, and Trauma in American Literature
CRN #7238
10:10 – 11:00 a.m.  M W F
Dr. Jennifer Haytock

This course guides students in studying the contemporary issue of war trauma through the fields of literature (Humanities) and trauma studies (Art, Humanities, and Social Sciences).  We will focus on American literature of recent wars, primarily that in Iraq, although we will also examine literature of older wars in order to understand how the genre of the war novel functions, including its relationship to American identity and masculinity in particular, and how different generations and genders have responded to war trauma.  These texts represent the trauma of combat, the loss of comrades, the misunderstanding and inability to communicate with loved ones at home, and the possibilities for healing.  We will read works by such authors as Tim O'Brien, Brian Turner, Ben Fountain, Helen Benedict, Leslie Marmon Silko, Kevin Powers, and others.  Counts as a Contemporary Issues course and, for English majors, a late American literature course and Texts and Contexts course.


ENG 422.01 New Worlds in Renaissance Literature
CRN #7912
11:00 – 12:15 p.m.   T R
Dr. Michael Slater

When Christopher Columbus inadvertently discovered what would come to be called the "new world" in 1492, he opened for the imagination a whole new realm of possibilities.  Encountering a previously unknown world had implications for virtually every facet of Renaissance culture—commerce, politics, science, and even literature.  For writers from Thomas More to Edmund Spenser, from Shakespeare to Donne to Bacon, "new worlds" became a fascinating site for literary exploration.  Even for a scientist like Kepler, the possibilities this discovery entailed for literature were enticing: inspired by such journeys into the unknown, Kepler imagined a full three centuries ahead of his time a trip to the moon "with ships or sails adapted to the heavenly breezes," describing in his fictional text The Dream a brave new world in outer space.  This class will examine the significance of these "new worlds"—both real and fantastic—for early modern literature throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.  Readings will include texts by Christopher Columbus, Sir Walter Raleigh, St. Thomas More, Edmund Spenser, Francis Bacon, William Shakespeare, John Donne, Johannes Kepler, and Margaret Cavendish.


ENG 436.01 Modern British Literature: Text, Image and Object
CRN #7913
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.  T
Dr. Alissa Karl

The early decades of the twentieth century are well-known for experimentation and literature and art; for a technological innovation; for accelerated of mass-production and mass-consumption; and for a new forms of global interconnectedness forged by late imperialism, and transnational finance and trade.  In this 400-level seminar, we'll examine how literary texts are related to image and object cultures in early twentieth century British (and some transnational) contexts.  In particular we'll consider the styles and rhetorics of written texts like novels and poems alongside those from the visual arts, advertising, new typographies, and some sculpture and object cultures.  We'll try to figure out whether and how different kinds of texts can be up to the same kinds of things, especially when it comes to dealing with historical realities and controversies like imperialism, technological change, warfare and mass consumer culture.

The class will roughly feature four units on 1) impressionism, imagism and late imperialism; 2) futurism, vorticism, technology and war; 3) consumer culture and advertising; and 4) a special study of modernist "little magazines" – a prominent form in the early twentieth century that combined literary writings, visual arts, typographical experimentation, and sometimes manifestoes.  You don't need to have any background in visual arts to take part in this class—indeed, it will be designed to use your existing close-reading skills and to apply them to new kinds of things, while also helping us place literature into new contexts.  As this is a 400-level seminar, students should also expect to read scholarly work relevant to our topic; prepare a group and an individual presentation for the class; and research and write a substantial scholarly essay.


ENG 472.01 Narrative and Human Rights
CRN #7026
3:35 - 4:50 p.m.  M W
Dr. T. Gregory Garvey

The human being didn't always exist.  It is a rather new thing.  The modern construction of the human being is related both to the sense that each individual has an interior psychological life, and to the belief that each individual is the bearer of rights that are inseparable from his or her humanity.  In this course we will explore the simultaneous emergence of the novel as narrative means of exploring the interiority of the individual and the human rights as a means of defining universal standards for recognition between individuals.  We will study literary texts such as Nobel Prize winner J.M. Coetzee's novel Waiting for the Barbarians, memoirs such as Nobel Prize winner Ellie Weisel's Holocaust memoir Night, historical documents such as the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. We will also study deeply affirmative narratives such as Willa Cather's My Antonia.  The development of new narrative forms and philosophical doctrines that emphasize universal human similarity put pressure on the trends that produced the master race theories of 19th century imperialism and the genocides of the 20th century.


ENG 472.02 Objects, Others, and Things in the Eighteenth-Century British Literature
Senior Capstone Seminar
CRN #6763
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  R
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot

This capstone seminar will explore the world of objects in eighteenth-century British literature and culture.  Students will read literature that focuses on everyday objects, fashion and dress, and other things that become objects of exchange in the eighteenth century; this means our analysis will extend from popular commodities and objects of dress, to the relationship between animals, humans, and objects and the construction of ideas about wealth, property and sentimental feelings.  We will read poetry, it-narratives (where objects and animals begin to speak for themselves and tell their own stories), essay periodicals, a fictional travel narrative, an autobiographical slave narrative, and a novel.  The concern with objects and their representation in art and literature will be our main focus, as we look at multiple genres and cultural contexts (including images of material artifacts, representations of objects in fine art, and accounts of lost objects in newspapers, for example).  We will also consider human rights and animal ethics contexts when we discuss the representation of humans and animals as objects of exchange in eighteenth-century literature.


ENG 473.01 Ling Sec Lang Acquisition
CRN #8184
1:25 – 2:15 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Ewelina Barski-Moskal

This is an introductory course to linguistics and second language acquisition.  It covers the following core linguistic components: Phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics.  Additionally language change and second language acquisition (theories and in the classroom) will be discussed.  This course includes a practical OPI (oral proficiency interview) component where students will have the opportunity to work with proficiency standards by listening to and rating oral language samples in Spanish, French and English (as a second language) on a variety of topics.

 

ENG 479.01 Linguistics
CRN #6756
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  W
Ms. Sasha Eloi

This course introduces the basic concepts of linguistics, which is the scientific study of human languages.  Students will be introduced to the core disciplines and principles of linguistics through discussion and the analysis of a wide range of linguistic data based on current linguistic models.  English will often serve as the reference language, but we will discuss a wide variety of languages, including American Indian languages and sign languages to illustrate core concepts in linguistics.  The course will have relevance to other disciplines in the humanities, sciences, and technical fields.  Students will be encouraged to develop critical thinking regarding the study of human languages through discussions of the origins of languages, how languages are acquired, their organization in the brain, and languages' socio-cultural roles.


ENG 482.01 Children's Literature: Social Protest and the Child
CRN #6723
3:30 – 4:45 p.m.   T R
Dr. Kristen Proehl

From Chinese fairy tales to Dr. Seuss's The Lorax, this course will offer an extensive survey of children's literature and its social, literary, and historical contexts.  Drawing upon secondary readings in critical race studies, postcolonial theory, feminist and queer studies, and the history of childhood, this course will focus especially upon the relationship between children's literature and the social protest tradition.  We will ask the following questions, among others: How and why has children's literature often served as a medium for social criticism?  How have children's authors and illustrators invoked the figure of the "innocent child" to advocate for social justice? How have authors critiqued hierarchies of race, gender, and class?  Who buys, markets, reads, and distributes children's literature?  What makes a children's book controversial?  What transforms a children's author into a public icon?  Our readings may include J.M. Barrie's Peter Pan, Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden, Ezra Jack Keats's The Snowy Day, Charles Dickens's Oliver Twist, Maurice Sendak's Outside Over There, Louise Erdrich's The Birchbark House, and many others.  Through writing assignments, class discussions, research, and close analysis exercises, this course will also further enhance your critical reading, writing, and communication skills.


ENG 482.02 Children's Literature: Money matters
CRN #6866
11:15 – 12:05 p.m.   M W F
Ms. April Daniels

Through reading children's literature, from the classic fairy talesto picture books, from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, we can trace changing notions of "the child" and become acquainted with the inception of the concept of "childhood" itself.  We can also wrestle with questions around the ethics of marketing to children, what constitutes appropriate content for children, and genre boundaries.  Our emphasis will be on reading, discussing, and writing about children's literature in such ways as to generate understanding of these texts as both works of art and causes and effects of socio-political phenomena.  We will read our texts through various critical lenses, including eco-criticism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, and gender studies.


ENG 484.01 Young Adult Literature: Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Adolescent Transformations
CRN #6725
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.  T R
Dr. Kristen Proehl

Covering texts ranging from Louisa May Alcott's Little Women (1868) to Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis (2000), this course will explore some of the major themes, issues, and conventions of young adult literature.  We will focus principally upon the coming-of-age narrative and texts that interrogate, establish, and disrupt its conventions.   Drawing upon secondary readings in critical race studies, the history of childhood, and feminist and queer theory, we will discuss related issues of censorship, social criticism, and the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class in YA literature.  Our readings will include literature marketed to adolescent audiences, as well as texts that are frequently assigned at the middle-and high-school levels.  Key texts may include Sherman Alexie's The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, John Knowles's A Separate Peace, J.R.R. Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring, Stephen Crane's The Red Badge of Courage, Alice Walker's The Color Purple, and Suzanne Collins's The Hunger Games, among others.   Collectively, we will work to understand and develop our own definitions of key terms for this course, such as "adolescence," "fantasy," "realism," "dystopian fiction," and others.  Through writing assignments, class discussions, research, and close analysis exercises, this course will also further enhance your critical reading, writing, and communication skills.


ENG 484.02 Young Adult Literature
CRN #6867
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.   R
Dr. Kristen Proehl

Same as above.


ENG 491.01 Advanced Fiction Writers Workshop
RN #6727
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  M
Dr. James Whorton

This is an advanced course in fiction writing.  We will study short stories by a variety of contemporary writers, and each student will write two short stories to be discussed in the workshop and one book review.  Written critiques will be due at every meeting, and revised stories will be due at the end of the semester.  Prerequisites: ENG 305 (Poetry Workshop) and ENG 304 or 306 (Fiction or Nonfiction Workshop).  Email jwhorton@brockport.edu for permission to enroll.

Required text: Strunk and White.  The Elements of Style.  4th ed.  Allyn & Bacon, 1999.

ISBN 0-205-31342-6


ENG 492.01 Advanced Poetry Writing
CRN #7914
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.   T
Dr. Ralph Black

This workshop is designed to further the study and practice of poetry.  The bulk of our class time will focus on the critiquing and honing of poems submitted by workshop participants.  Our class motto comes from the great Irish modernist, Samuel Beckett, who said "Fail Better."  Such workshops will invariably lead to broader discussions of the craft of poetry.  The remainder of the time will be spent discussing (and writing about) various assigned readings—collections of poetry, craft-related essays written by poets, criticism, etc.  This component of the course will take up at least 1/3 of our time in class.  Assignments will include: weekly poems, critical essay, poetry recitations, final portfolio.  Both ENG 210 and ENG 305 are prerequisites for this course.


ENG 495.01 Writer's Craft
CRN #6721
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  W
Dr. Anne Panning

Writer's Craft will focus on "craft"—those decisions the writer makes in order to shape the work in a certain way. The course will explore distinctions in genre—with special attention to the craft of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction—and we will attempt to discover why the writer chose a particular genre for a particular material.  We will read the work of those writers who will appear as part of the Writers Forum series; we will meet briefly with those writers in order to discuss their work, again with a focus on issues of craft.  Attendance at The Writers Forum is mandatory. Students will be expected to turn in a series of short craft-based, critical papers for each writer who visits The Forum.


FLM 250.01 Film History Part I
CRN #6760
9:30 –10:45 a.m.  T R
Dr. Carter Soles

This course studies how cinema historically evolved as an institution and an art form from its origins in the 19th century, through the silent era, into the Golden Age of sound cinema.  Our main focus will be on the specific history of the film industry, as well as the ways in which film reflects, responds to, and is impacted by larger events in world history (e.g., world wars, technological advances, cultural shifts, etc.).  The aim of the course is to explore the history of Hollywood and world cinema and develop the critical skills to analyze particular film works and movements.  You will learn crucial dates and time periods in the development of cinema, examine important connections and influences that exist between historically significant world film movements, and develop basic formal film analysis (i.e., "close reading") skills with which to analyze specific films and visual media texts.


FLM 251.01 Film History Part II
CRN #7326
3:30 –5:30 p.m.  T R
Dr. Sid Rosenzweig

This course traces the evolution of cinema from WWII until the present-day "blockbuster era."  Examines the major films and movements in the cross-cultural evolution of film since the emergence of the "international art cinema" in the 1950s and the New Cinemas of the 1960s.  Our main focus will be on the specific history of the film industry, as well as the ways in which film reflects, responds to, and is impacted by larger events in world history (e.g., world wars, technological advances, cultural shifts, etc.).  The aim of the course is to explore the history of Hollywood and world cinema and develop the critical skills to analyze particular film works and movements.  You will learn crucial dates and time periods in the development of cinema, examine important connections and influences that exist between historically significant world film movements, and develop basic formal film analysis (i.e., "close reading") skills with which to analyze specific films and visual media texts.


FLM 301.01 Film Theory and Criticism
CRN #6774
11:00 – 12:15 p.m.   T R
Dr. Carter Soles

From its inception in the late 1890s through the current impacts of digital technology, film as a medium has always been subject to intense scrutiny and inquiry regarding its meanings, aesthetics, and social effects.  This course will offer an overview of many of these debates, examining how film scholars and cultural critics have approached the interpretation of film (and other popular media).  This class, therefore, will introduce you to the key terms, ideas, and discourses within the theory and criticism of film as a medium.  Focusing primarily on film studies as an academic discipline, this course will offer you a set of interpretative tools and analytical frameworks not only for your future academic study of film but for your everyday consumption of film and other visual media.  We will pay particular attention to the application of theory and criticism: how do you take the broad ideas of theory and use them in your own interpretations?  How do you take the specific interpretations of criticism and develop a broader argument that can be applied to other texts?  To that end, we will examine both historically significant films as well as more contemporary films in our examination of film and its ideological meaning(s).


FLM 310.01 Hitchcock
CRN #8022
6:30 –8:30 p.m.  T R
Dr. Sid Rosenzweig

Ask someone to name a "classic" (as opposed to contemporary) film director, and there's a good chance the first name thought of will be Alfred Hitchcock.  Because he worked almost exclusively in a single genre, the thriller, displayed a consistent, inventive visual style, and explored an equally consistent set of themes and ideas (or obsessions), Hitchcock has become the virtual definition of the filmmaker as "auteur" (author).  By looking closely at a number of his best known films, we'll examine his visual style and thematic concerns. We'll also look at a few films by other critically praised thriller directors (including some Europeans), and compare their style and themes with Hitchcock's.  Finally, by studying various written works about Hitchcock, and changing attitudes and opinions about his work, we'll see how the academic study of film has been evolving.


FLM 401.01 American Independent Cinema
CRN #8023
2:00 – 3:15 p.m.  T R
Dr. Carter Soles

Many factors contributed to the upsurge in popularity and profitability of American independent film production over the course of the 1980s and 1990s.  These included new developments in the industrial and financial infrastructure of studio-based and independent cinema, as well as an increased market for offbeat, alternative, queer, and "smart" cinema in the U.S.   This course will serve as both an historical survey of American Independent cinema in the 1990s as well as an introduction to the formal analysis of film and visual media texts in general.   We will approach these concerns through rigorous textual analysis (close readings) of the films themselves, secondary readings by John Pierson, Geoff King, Peter Biskind, and others, and class discussions.   Films to be screened include The Return of the Secaucus Seven; Stranger Than Paradise; Slacker; She's Gotta Have It; sex, lies, and videotape; The Wedding Banquet; Gas, Food, Lodging; Reservior Dogs; Go Fish; Kids; and Happiness.

 

 


 

 Spring 2015 Graduate Course Descriptions


ENG 579.01 Linguistics              
CRN #6757
6:30 - 9:15   W
Ms. Sasha Eloi

This course introduces the basic concepts of linguistics, which is the scientific study of human languages.  Students will be introduced to the core disciplines and principles of linguistics through discussion and the analysis of a wide range of linguistic data based on current linguistic models.  English will often serve as the reference language, but we will discuss a wide variety of languages, including American Indian languages and sign languages to illustrate core concepts in linguistics.  The course will have relevance to other disciplines in the humanities, sciences, and technical fields.  Students will be encouraged to develop critical thinking regarding the study of human languages through discussions of the origins of languages, how languages are acquired, their organization in the brain, and languages' socio-cultural roles.


ENG 582.61 Children’s Literature: Money, Power, and a few Picture Books
CRN #7243
Dr. Megan Norcia
SLN ( no synchronous meetings)

Though not often acknowledged, money plays a central role in children’s texts. We will investigate how characters in a range of texts from the early nineteenth century to the early twenty-first century approach a commercial world in which they themselves may have little capital or ability to change their economic station.  How do child characters fare in the marketplace when beset by enchanted shoes, goblins vendors, or tempting goods in shop windows?  We will analyze the distinctions drawn between those who hustle for money blacking shoes on the streets versus those whose wealth is inherited.  We will examine a range of texts, from fairy tales, poems, and short stories to novels in order to develop an understanding of how money matters, and how it is represented in tales written for child audiences.  The goals of this course are to increase students’ familiarity with the rich history of children’s literature; to help readers gain an understanding of “childhood” as an eighteenth-century construct, and to study the ways in which this construct has been amended, altered, and revised in a contemporary context; to evaluate critical articles and the arguments they make, considering them as models for students’ own writing as they join a professional conversation about literature.  In addition to participation in online discussion forums, students will develop abstracts and bibliographies which they will rework into conference paper drafts which will then be revised after instructor feedback for a final paper. 


ENG 584.01 Young Adult Literature: Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Adolescent Transformations
CRN #6726
12:30 – 1:45   T R
Dr. Kristen Proehl

Covering texts ranging from Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women (1868) to Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis (2000), this course will explore some of the major themes, issues, and conventions of young adult literature.  We will focus principally upon the coming-of-age narrative and texts that interrogate, establish, and disrupt its conventions.   Drawing upon secondary readings in critical race studies, the history of childhood, and feminist and queer theory, we will discuss related issues of censorship, social criticism, and the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class in YA literature.  Our readings will include literature marketed to adolescent audiences, as well as texts that are frequently assigned at the middle-and high-school levels.  Key texts may include Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, John Knowles’s A Separate Peace, J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Fellowship of the Ring, Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage, Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, and Suzanne Collins’s The Hunger Games, among others.   Collectively, we will work to understand and develop our own definitions of key terms for this course, such as “adolescence,” “fantasy,” “realism,” “dystopian fiction,” and others.  Through writing assignments, class discussions, research, and close analysis exercises, this course will also further enhance your critical reading, writing, and communication skills. 


ENG 584.02 Young Adult Literature
CRN #6868
6:30 – 9:15   R
Dr. Kristen Proehl

Same as above


ENG 595.01 Writer’s Craft         
CRN #6722
6:30 – 9:15   W
Dr. Anne Panning

Writer’s Craft will focus on "craft"—those decisions the writer makes in order to shape the work in a certain way. The course will explore distinctions in genre—with special attention to the craft of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction—and we will attempt to discover why the writer chose a particular genre for a particular material.  We will read the work of those writers who will appear as part of the Writers Forum series; we will meet briefly with those writers in order to discuss their work, again with a focus on issues of craft. Attendance at The Writers Forum is mandatory.  Graduate students will be write a craft-based, critical paper for each writer who visits The Forum, as well as deliver a class presentation on one of the visiting writers.


ENG 603.01 Seminar in Creative Writing
CRN #6758
3:35 – 6:20 p.m.   M
Dr. Anne Panning

This seminar is for graduate students in the MA Creative Writing track.  Note: while it may entail some creative writing exercises and activities, this course will not operate like a creative writing workshop.  The course will be divided into two sections:  1) creative writing theory and pedagogy, and 2) writing and publishing in the digital age. Much will be asked of students in this course, including producing a multi-media "bricolage" project, preparing and submitting work for publication, designing syllabi for literature and creative writing courses, and reviewing established as well as new literary magazines and journals.


ENG 616.01 Sex and Salvation:  the Literary World of John Donne
CRN #7925
6:30 – 9:15   M
Dr. Brooke Conti

This course will explore the most important artistic, intellectual, and philosophical movements of the English Renaissance through a focus on the life and works of John Donne.  Because Donne’s works are wide-ranging in form and subject—they include salacious love poetry, anguished religious lyric, political satire, sermons, and devotional prose—they provide an ideal overview of both the major issues of the time period and the major strands of twentieth- and twenty-first-century literary criticism.

In addition to Donne’s works, we will be reading recent scholarship in the areas of editorial theory, book history, cultural studies, gender studies, psychoanalysis, science and literature, and religion and literature. Short assignments throughout the semester will encourage students to think about such issues as reading practices (then and now), genre, canon formation, and the way texts get circulated, revised, and edited over time.  The course will culminate in an independent research project.


ENG 633.01 Beauty & Morrison
CRN #7915
6:30 – 9:15   T
Dr. Althea Tait


ENG 692.01 Poetry Workshop             
CRN #6759
6:30 – 9:15   R (Hybrid)
Dr. Steve Fellner


ENG 697.01 Advanced Project              
CRN #6765
Dr. Janie Hinds

 

 

 

 

Last Updated 10/22/14