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Brockport / English / Fall 2013

Fall 2013 Course Descriptions

ENG 210.01 Creative Writing
CRN #4540
2:00 – 3:15 p.m.  T R
Dr. Stephen Fellner
B0300 Tuttle N.

ENG 210.02 Creative Writing
CRN #4541
10:10 – 11:00 a.m.  M W F
Mrs. Sarah Cedeno
219 Hartwell

This class requires a serious investment in creating and sharing imaginative work. Students will develop a basic knowledge of the craft by discussing elements of polished essays, poems and stories. During the semester, students will write pieces of fiction, nonfiction and poetry, and share those pieces with classmates. As part of a writing workshop, students are required to offer constructive criticism to others, as well as accept written and verbal critiques for use in revising their own work.

ENG 210.03 Creative Writing
CRN #4542
9:30 – 10:15 a.m.   T R
Mr. Thomas Metzger
TBA

ENG 210 is an introductory level course that will give students opportunities to explore poetry, and short fiction. Besides basic writer's craft, editing and critical response will be
emphasized.

ENG 210.04 Creative Writing
CRN #4543
2:00 – 3:15 p.m.  T R
Mrs. M.J. Iuppa
G013 Smith

This gateway course is a four genre smorgasbord that’s guaranteed to whet the creative writer’s appetite. Students will explore the fundamental skills of poetry, fiction, nonfiction and play writing. For some, this creative writing workshop experience will be new– unlike any other they’ve experienced; while others may find this workshop an opportunity to push their writing skills further. The course is designed around the belief that one must read widely and closely in order to write. This is an intensive writing course, meant for students who are dedicated readers and serious about the process of writing. We will examine the works of both established and emerging writers in hopes of discerning and emulating the qualities of good poetry, fiction, nonfiction and play writing. Frequent writing exercises will provide the opportunity to practice, to imitate, and to experiment. Class members will work together to create a welcoming and productive workshop, including extensive in-class discussion of both published writers and student work. Students will write four critical shorts that explore elements of writer’s craft. At the end of the semester, each student will submit a portfolio of selected (revised) creative works. Get ready for an all you can write semester.

ENG 210.05 Creative Writing
CRN #4544
3:30 – 4:45 p.m.  T R
Mrs. M.J. Iuppa
G013 Smith

Same as above.

ENG 220.01 Early World Literature: The Beginnings
CRN #4941
12:20 – 1:10 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Sevinc Turkkan
218 Hartwell

This course studies the epic, religious, and dramatic traditions of the ancient world from the beginnings until around 14th century of the Common Era. The selected readings offer insights into the literary, religious, and philosophical traditions of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, showing their continuities and discontinuities among each other as well as between them and those of Europe. We will critically examine notions such as “West” and “non-West” and will discuss the premises of cultural and civilizational difference in relation to the assigned readings. The literary heritage of the world spans five millennia of recorded history: from ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, India, China, and Japan to modern times around the globe. No single course could possibly represent the infinite magnitude of the world’s literary heritage; nevertheless, we must seriously work at expanding our awareness and understanding of the world in which we live based on the literary tradition we have inherited.

ENG 220.02 Early World Literature
CRN #4942
10:10 – 11:00 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Sevinc Turkkan
136 Lennon

Same as above.

ENG 223.01 Modern World Literature
CRN #4614
11:15 – 12:05 p.m. M W F
Ms. Herma Volpe-van Dijk      

218 Hartwell

Explores literatures of the world since 1700 with a focus on texts outside the British and American literary traditions.  Introduces major themes and developments in modern world literature, from a global and comparative perspective; situates the Western literary tradition within that larger framework.<>

ENG 223.02 Modern World Literature
CRN #4615
2:30 – 3:20 p.m. M W F
Dr. Gregory Garvey      

31 Hartwell

Explores literatures of the world since 1700, with a focus on texts outside the British and American literary traditions.

ENG 228.01 Literature & Arts of Ancient China
CRN #4754
11:00 – 12:15 p.m. T R
Mr. Lars Mazzola      

1115 Tower

Critical approaches to pre Confucian and Confucian texts in the context of Ancient Chinese culture, including instruction in Chi Kung and conflict management.
 

ENG 230.01 British Literature I
CRN #4536
2:00 – 3:15 p.m. T R
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot  

136 Lennon

In this course, you will learn how to read literary texts (poems, works of fiction, novels) in relation to their historical time period. We will begin with the earliest English literature, and will study three different eras: The Middle Ages, The Renaissance (or Early Modern period), and the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. Although these texts were written a long time ago (and are sometimes set in the even-more-distant past), there are some literary plots, characters, or settings that might seem familiar to you. We will pay special attention to the literary convention of the hero and heroine and will ask how each work that we study portrays a hero or heroine in complex ways. The goal is to help you develop your understanding of historical context, your ability to read literary texts, and your critical analysis, writing, and communication skills with each work you study this term. 
 Some of the questions we will ask in this course are:

Why tell stories from the past?
Why read stories about the past?
Why use a particular genre (epic, poetry, prose, novel) to express an opinion or tell a story about both past worlds and contemporary worlds?
What do the course authors gain from telling others’ stories and representing other worlds?

ENG 231.01 British Literature II
CRN #4537
2:00 – 3:15 p.m. T R
Dr. Alissa Karl    

127 Hartwell

ENG 235.01 Intro Afro-American Literature
CRN #4545
1:25 – 2:15 p.m.  M W F
Dr. John Marah    
136 Lennon

An introductory survey of the literature of Black peoples in the Americas.  The course will acquaint students with major literary figures and significant historical periods.  Issues regarding the relationship between the writer and socio-political and cultural movements will be discussed.  Questions concerning the socio-cultural function that the Black writer serves for his/her community will also be addressed. This course fulfills the AAS major/minor lower division and humanities elective.

ENG 240.01 American Literature I
CRN #4538
9:30 - 10:45 a.m.  T R
Dr. Phil Young    
218 Hartwell

Surveys texts written in or about America from the post-Civil War era to the present. Introduces students to literary movements of the period such as realism, modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat generation, postmodernism, and the rise of ethnic American writing. May include writers such as James, Stein, Hughes, Ginsberg, Pynchon, and Kingston.

ENG 241.01 American Literature II
CRN #4539
2:00 - 3:15 p.m.  T R
Dr. Megan Obourn    
218 Hartwell

American Literature II is a survey class that covers U.S. literary writing from the post-Civil War era to the present. Though we will focus on canonical literary works, we will also be looking at some less canonical, emergent writers toward the end of the semester.   We will examine major literary movements such as realism, modernism and post-modernism. We will also look at social and political contexts—including Reconstruction and its failure, turn-of-the-century immigration, the World Wars, the Great Migration, New Social Movements—and their relation to broad literary movements and particular literary texts. By the end of the semester, I expect you to have a good grasp of literary time periods, historical contexts, and close reading techniques.

ENG 300.01 Advanced Composition (fulfills Adolescence Education certification requirement)
CRN #4564
12:20 - 1:10 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Amy Green    
11 Hartwell

Being a professional requires the ability to communicate effectively with professors, colleagues, clients, and/or the public.  Advanced Composition will focus on some kinds of writing tasks demanded by academic, professional, and business worlds.  Major projects will include narrative, analytical, and research writing.  In addition, techniques of summarizing, reviewing, synthesizing, compiling statistics, and analyzing will be covered. The final project, an investigative research paper on a topic of the student’s choice, will invite students to explore both primary and secondary sources and encourage them to use enhancements, (i.e. illustrations, graphs, appendices, informational footnotes, PowerPoint presentations) which will help to convey their ideas effectively.

ENG 303.01 Introduction to Literary Analysis
CRN #4559
12:20 - 1:10 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Miriam Burstein    
214 Hartwell

This course offers students a “toolkit” for close reading. We will work with multiple genres—poetry, fiction, drama, film—and practice the skills necessary for analyzing and appreciating each. Among other things, students will practice basic poetic scansion, learn what constitutes different genres, and develop a working knowledge of critical vocabulary. This is a hands-on course, not a lecture: students should come prepared for in-class discussion and regular exercises. Readings include extensive poetry selections; Shakespeare’s King Lear; Balzac’s Pere Goriot; and one or two contemporary dramas. We will also watch Nicholas Hytner’s The Madness of King George.   Three essays, midterm, final, group oral presentation.

ENG 303.02 Introduction to Literary Analysis
CRN #4560
10:10 – 11:00 a.m.  M W F
Dr. Jennifer Haytock    
TBA

ENG 303 is the foundation course required of undergraduate English majors and minors, designed to teach you how to read, write, and think like a serious student of literature.  We will study the conventions of various literary genres, particularly poetry, drama, and fiction.  In the process of discussing different types of literature, we will investigate many of the tools you need to be successful, including active reading and critical thinking, grammar and rhetoric, critical theories (different ways of looking at a given text), and literary terminology.

ENG 303.03 Introduction to Literary Analysis
CRN #4561
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  M
Dr. Megan Norcia
11 Hartwell

For English majors and prospective majors. Provides skills needed to understand literature in English. Includes close reading of selected texts and study of literary genres, critical terms, and the relationship between text and context. Provides practice in writing literary analyses. Emphasizes skills of generating, rewriting, and editing the documented critical essay and other nonfiction prose suitable to the needs and future careers of English majors.

ENG 303.04 Introduction to Literary Analysis
CRN #4562
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.  T R
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot    
B0221 Tuttle N.

This course will introduce you to the skills you will need to read and analyze literature. Along the way, it should also help you develop your vocabulary and enable you to open your mind to new thoughts and new ways of expressing those thoughts. We will focus on four genres of literature: the short story, the novel, poetry, and drama. You will learn how to read closely and to consider the relationship between elements of a short story/novel/poem play and the text as a whole, as well as a work’s relationship to cultural and historical contexts. We will consider not only the form and structure of a work, but also how that form and structure relate to the more abstract philosophical ideas that the work conveys. You will also learn about different critical approaches to reading literature and will develop your own critical voice.

ENG 304.01 Fiction Workshop
CRN #4546
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.  T R
Mr. Thomas Metzger  
120 Hartwell

Prerequisite: ENL 210 or instructor’s permission.  We’ll spend most of the time workshopping stories by members of the class.  This means close reading, written response and honest discussion.  Students without some experience with the workshop process may be at a disadvantage.

My classroom style is fairly informal and fairly aggressive.  So we’ll dispense with the early semester niceties quickly and get to work on the difficult, at times painful, labor of crafting, analyzing, disassembling and rebuilding strong fiction.  This course is a Workshop requirement for Creative Writing majors.

ENG 305.01 Poetry Writer’s Workshop
CRN #4557
3:30 - 4:45 p.m.  T R
Dr. Stephen Fellner    
207 Holmes

ENG 305.02 Poetry Writer’s Workshop
CRN #4558
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  R
Dr. Stephen Fellner    
B0226 Tuttle N

ENG 306.01 Creative Nonfiction Workshop: Food Writing
CRN #4943
3:30 - 4:45 p.m.  T R
Dr. Anne Panning    
B0225 Tuttle N.

NOTE: This course is for creative writing majors in English who have met the proper prerequisites (ENG 210).  In this course, students will produce at least two original essays that will focus in some way on food. Students will read a great variety of food writing, and will learn the basics of how to produce effective creative nonfiction.  This is a creative writing workshop designed for creative writing ENG majors who have already been trained in the basics of critiquing original work in a workshop format. This is not a literature class, though there will plenty of required reading and quizzes.

ENG 314 Modern European Literature
CRN #5555
9:30 - 10:45 a.m.  T R
Dr. Sharon Lubkemann Allen    
TBA

ENG 324.01 Shakespeare Comedy & Romance
CRN #4616
9:30 - 10:45 a.m.  T R
TBA  
TBA

ENG 324.02 Shakespeare Comedy & Romance
CRN #5556
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.  T R
TBA  
TBA

ENG 331 American Novel I
CRN #5557
1:25 - 2:15 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Gregory Garvey
122 Hartwell

Novels formed a very common form of interacting with the world. People read them, shared them, discussed them in letters and at family gatherings. In this course we will study how American novelists in the nineteenth century represented the world of their experience--how did they represent questions of equality? What did they want to underscore about history? How did they address slavery and antislavery? What role did growing calls for equality play in their thought? Toward this end, we may read novels by Susanna Rowson (not Charlotte Temple), Louisa May Alcott, Hawthorne, George Lippard, Melville, and Harriet Jacobs.

ENG/WMS 348.01 Sex and Gender in Literary Theory
CRN #4617
3:30 - 4:45 p.m.  T R
Dr. Megan Obourn
219 Hartwell

This course provides an advanced introduction to the traditions of literary theory and criticism related to sex and gender studies. We will closely analyze primary theoretical material as well as literature in relation to theories of gender and sexuality. The course is organized according to the “school” of criticism or theory that each of our critics works within. Most gender and sexuality theories draw on multiple schools of thought; be prepared to see overlaps in critics’ approaches. Though theories of sex and gender have a long, complex and international history, we will focus on selected contemporary critical approaches largely by authors from Europe and the Americas. We will touch on sex and gender criticism in relation to structuralist, post-structuralist, psychoanalytic, queer, intersex, Marxist, critical race, postcolonial, and disability theory. This is not an exhaustive list but does cover many of the main schools of contemporary critical thinking about gender and sexuality.
The course includes both the theory itself and the applied theory: you will learn not just theoretical descriptions of gender criticism and theory, but how to use this theory in your critical thinking, reading and writing practices. To that end, we will read a novel along with some applied criticism.

ENG 367.01 Women in World Literature: Gender and Power
CRN #5558
11:00 -12:15 p.m.  T R
Dr. Sevinc Turkkan
B0220 Tuttle N.

This course intends to interrogate the construction and representation of two analytical categories: gender and power. Beside class and race, gender is one of the most crucial categories for analyzing history and its representations in literature. Gender signals how power is unevenly distributed across various divides. It is neither neutral nor self-evident but a construct with a capacity to interrupt, thwart, and reconfirm power dynamics. Reading literary texts written by women across the globe, we will pay attention to various textual tools women employ to negotiate their existence: story-telling, writing, rewriting, translating, metaphors of travel and masquerade, aesthetics, stylistics, and bending genre and gender conventions, among others. Through close reading and analyses of literary narratives, we will consider the concept of agency, the problem of voice, the status of the subaltern subject, the contradictions and violences of patriarchy and colonialism, and the relationship of texts, fictional or otherwise, to their historical and social contexts.  Questions of identity formation, discourses of difference, stereotype, conflict, and cultural communication will be inseparable from how we discuss aesthetics, literary influence, and narrative techniques.

ENG 375.01 British Novel I
CRN #5559
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  R
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot
B0220 Tuttle N.

ENG 378 20-21 Century British Literature
CRN #5561
11:00 - 12:15 p.m.  T R
Dr. Alissa Karl
TBA

ENG 379.01 After the Slave Narrative
CRN #5560
10:10 - 11:00 a.m.  M W F
Dr. Janie Hinds
TBA

This course will explore several central works of primarily African American literature from the late eighteenth century to the present, with a focus on the slave narrative genre as it has been produced and re-produced, altered and imitated to serve widely diverse social and literary purposes.  We will first ground ourselves in the early African American autobiographical tradition, reading narratives by survivors of slavery with an eye to their rhetorical strategies, stylistic choices, formal qualities, and elements of narrative content.  The majority of course readings will be texts “after” the slave narrative: those written later than but also “in the manner of” the slave narrative.  As a Texts & Contexts course, After the Slave Narrative requires reading from historical and scholarly works in addition to the literary texts; our goal is to come away with an understanding of the various contexts in which the slave narrative genre provided (and provides) voice to the underrepresented.

ENG 382.61 American Gothic
CRN #4737
Dr. Phil Young
SLN

ENG 423.01 Medieval British Literature
CRN #5562
2:30 – 3:20 p.m.  M W F
Dr. Stefan Jurasinski
258 Tuttle S.

Medieval British Literature. Special Topic: "Epic and Romance." What happened to these ancient genres in the Middle Ages? We will find out by meeting the doomed warriors of "The Song of Roland" and the doomed lovers in the "Lais" of Marie de France. We will also read the popular "Purgatory of St. Patrick," a legend concerning a hole in the ground in Ireland that leads to Purgatory. We will conclude with a late retelling of the story of Roland and Charlemagne featuring giant babies and competitive beard-burning.

ENG 472.01 Senior Seminar: Gender, Sexuality, Race and the Public Sphere
CRN #
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  T
Dr. Megan Obourn
217 Hartwell

This course investigates the categories of “the citizen” and “the public” in American literary texts through the lenses of feminist, queer theorists, and critical race theorists. Historians, psychoanalysts, literary critics, political scientists, theorists of globalization,and cultural critics have each increasingly scrutinized the underlying sexual and racial components of citizenship duties, rights, and obligations; as well as the ways in which sexual and racial components of citizenship are interlocking and interdependent for all citizen-subjects. Our readings will include Lauren Berlant, Michael Warner, Carole Pateman, and Philip Brian Harper, David Eng, Hortense Spillers and Jose Munoz. Using these theorists along side literary texts by Nella Larsen, Arturo Islas, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Sherman Alexie, we will investigate how sexuality, gender, and race become public, the ways in which groups organize themselves and become organized by larger social systems, and the extent to which national discourses are steeped in assumptions about race, gender, and sexual life.

ENG 472.02 James Bond, History and Politics
CRN #4618
3:30 - 4:45 p.m.  T R
Dr. Alissa Karl
214 Hartwell

As the James Bond/007 film franchise celebrates its fiftieth year, cultural critics have the opportunity to reflect upon its evolution across the latter half of the twentieth century and up to the present. In this course, students will examine select films from the Bond franchise within evolving global, cultural, gender and class politics with the aim of understanding how cultural, political and economic ideologies are manifest—and contested--within these popular texts. Specifically, we will examine the ways in which the Bond films comment upon the Cold War, nationalism, capitalism, the rise of feminism, and evolving racial politics. We’ll consider the status of James Bond within British class politics; the films’ shifting racial and geographic imaginaries; the changing status of the nation-state within geopolitics; and how the films are situated within and comment upon changing regimes of Western capitalism, from post-war welfare capitalism to contemporary neoliberalism. 
We’ll use our experience reading Bond films and texts to consider the procedures of cultural criticism more broadly, and to develop vocabularies and skills with which students can produce their own advanced analyses. To this end, we’ll also study works of theory and criticism to become conversant with their methodologies and to develop sophisticated writing skills that are the English major’s hallmark. This course will thus be as focused on honing writing and analytical skills as it is upon the Bond texts themselves. 


ENG 479.01 Linguistics
CRN #4620
3:35 - 4:50 p.m.  M W
Dr. Stefan Jurasinski
B0220 Tuttle N.

Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. Provides a study of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and sociolinguistics.

ENG 481.01 Standard Grammar
CRN #4547
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  W
Ms. Sasha Eloi
30 Hartwell

Surveys Prescriptive, Descriptive, Generative, and Contextual theories of grammar. Reviews the conventions of Standard Written English. Students analyze samples of their own writing to discover grammatical structures their personal styles favor, and they become aware of the variety of structural choices available to them as writers.

ENG 482.01 Children’s Literature: Money matters
CRN #4549
6:30 – 9:15 p.m.   W
Dr. Megan Norcia
B0227 Tuttle N

The course reading will be guided by the questions: are money matters the exclusive concern of adult bankers and economists? Does money matter in children’s literature and to child characters? And if so, how does it matter? What effect does money have on our child characters? How do they approach a commercial world in which they themselves may have little capital or ability to change their economic station? These questions are at the heart of the connection between money and power. If money matters, we will evaluate how much it matters in relation to the resources, skills, or personal relationships that the child characters leverage in order to achieve their goals without money. How do child characters fare in the marketplace when beset by enchanted shoes, goblins vendors, or tempting goods in shop windows? We will also consider the differences between Britain and America where money and means are further complicated by issues of social class. We will analyze the distinctions drawn between those who hustle for money blacking shoes on the streets versus those whose wealth is inherited. While nineteenth-century tales focus on overcoming greed and commercial temptation, the twentieth century tales offer us a glimpse of how money and the lack of it can positively shape the lives of characters in isolated, rural America. We will examine a range of texts, from fairy tales, poems, and short stories to novels in order to develop an understanding of how money matters, and how it is represented in tales written for child audiences. The goals of this course are to increase students’ familiarity with the rich history of children’s literature; to help readers gain an understanding of “childhood” as an eighteenth-century construct, and to study the ways in which this construct has been amended, altered, and revised in a contemporary context; and finally to reexamine well-loved texts to determine how the characters’ strategic escapes, evasions, and elisions comment upon social forces. Students will develop a facility for thinking and writing about seemingly simple literature, and will craft detailed arguments supported by evidence from the texts. Though this is not a methods course, those who do work with, care for, supervise, and play with children are encouraged to bring their experiences and insights to our discussions. Our mission will be to investigate how childhood and the child are represented in texts written for them by adults.

ENG 482.61 Children’s Literature: Money Matters
CRN #4551
Dr. Megan Norcia
SLN
The course reading will be guided by the questions: are money matters the exclusive concern of adult bankers and economists? Does money matter in children’s literature and to child characters? And if so, how does it matter? What effect does money have on our child characters? How do they approach a commercial world in which they themselves may have little capital or ability to change their economic station? These questions are at the heart of the connection between money and power. If money matters, we will evaluate how much it matters in relation to the resources, skills, or personal relationships that the child characters leverage in order to achieve their goals without money. How do child characters fare in the marketplace when beset by enchanted shoes, goblins vendors, or tempting goods in shop windows? We will also consider the differences between Britain and America where money and means are further complicated by issues of social class. We will analyze the distinctions drawn between those who hustle for money blacking shoes on the streets versus those whose wealth is inherited. While nineteenth-century tales focus on overcoming greed and commercial temptation, the twentieth century tales offer us a glimpse of how money and the lack of it can positively shape the lives of characters in isolated, rural America. We will examine a range of texts, from fairy tales, poems, and short stories to novels in order to develop an understanding of how money matters, and how it is represented in tales written for child audiences. The goals of this course are to increase students’ familiarity with the rich history of children’s literature; to help readers gain an understanding of “childhood” as an eighteenth-century construct, and to study the ways in which this construct has been amended, altered, and revised in a contemporary context; and finally to reexamine well-loved texts to determine how the characters’ strategic escapes, evasions, and elisions comment upon social forces. Students will develop a facility for thinking and writing about seemingly simple literature, and will craft detailed arguments supported by evidence from the texts. Though this is not a methods course, those who do work with, care for, supervise, and play with children are encouraged to bring their experiences and insights to our discussions. Our mission will be to investigate how childhood and the child are represented in texts written for them by adults.
**This section of the course will be conducted entirely online relying on online discussion boards, video lectures, and a final paper.

ENG 484.01 Young Adult Literature
CRN #4553
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  M
Dr. Kristen Proehl
TBA

Covering texts ranging from Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women (1868) to Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis (2000), this course will explore major themes, issues, and conventions of young adult literature. We will focus principally upon the coming-of-age narrative and texts that interrogate, establish, and disrupt its conventions. Our readings will include literature marketed to adolescent audiences, as well as texts that are frequently assigned at the middle-and high-school levels. Drawing upon secondary readings in critical race studies, the history of childhood, and feminist theory, we will also discuss related issues of censorship, social criticism, and the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class in YA literature. Through writing assignments, class discussions, research, and close analysis exercises, this course will also further enhance your critical reading, writing, and communication skills. Key readings will include Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, John Knowles’s A Separate Peace, J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Fellowship of the Ring, Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage, Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, Julia Alvarez’s In the Time of Butterflies, and Suzanne Collins’s The Hunger Games, among others. Collectively, we will work to understand and develop our own definitions of key terms for this course, such as “adolescence,” “fantasy,” “realism,” “dystopian fiction,” and others. 

ENG 484.02 Young Adult Literature
CRN #4949
3:35 – 4:50 p.m.   M W
Dr. Kristen Proehl
TBA

Same as above.

ENG 491.01 Advanced Fiction Workshop
CRN #4950
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  T
Dr. Anne Panning
136 Lennon

NOTE: This course is for creative writing majors in English who have met the proper prerequisites.  In this course, students will produce at least two original short stories for critique and feedback.  You will also read one contemporary short story collection and write a review of it.  We will read a wide variety of literary magazines, both online and paper, and write reviews of them. There will be regular quizzes and exercises in class to accompany assigned reading. You must have taken (and passed) ENG 210 and ENG 304 or 306 to take this course.

ENG 492.01 Advanced Poetry Workshop
CRN #4554
3:35 - 4:50 p.m.  M W
Dr. Ralph Black
114 Smith

This workshop is designed to further the study and practice of poetry. The bulk of our class time will focus on the critiquing and honing of poems submitted by workshop participants. Our class motto comes from the great Irish modernist, Samuel Beckett, who said “Fail Better.” Such workshops will invariably lead to broader discussions of the craft of poetry. The remainder of the time will be spent discussing (and writing about) various assigned readings—collections of
poetry, craft-related essays written by poets, criticism, etc. This component of the course will take up at least 1/3 of our time in class. Assignments will include: weekly poems, critical essay, poetry recitations, final portfolio. Both ENL 210 and ENL 302 are prerequisites for this course.

ENG 495.01 Writer’s Craft
CRN #4571
6:30 - 9:15 p.m.  W
Dr. Ralph Black
B0005 Cooper/219 Hartwell

Writer’s Craft is a literature course.  We will focus on matters of "craft"--those decisions a writer makes in order to shape a poem or story or essay in a particular way.  This might include questions about voice, imagery, perspective, form, subject, diction, etc. The course will explore distinctions in genre--with special attention to the craft of fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction--and we will strive to understand why the writer chose a particular genre for a particular material.  We will read the work of those writers who will appear as part of The Writer’s Forum reading series; we will meet briefly with those writers in order to discuss their work, again with a focus on issues of craft.  Attendance at The Writer’s Forum readings is mandatory.  Students will be expected to turn in a series of short response papers to culminate in a final portfolio.  In addition, we will view and discuss a number of the interviews from the Writer’s Forum Videotape Library.

FLM 250.01 Film History I
CRN #4629
3:30 –5:30 T R
Dr. Sidney Rosenzweig
103 Edwards

This introductory course in film studies focuses on two main areas of film studies: (1) the technical vocabulary of filmmaking and film art and (2) the basics of film history. The first considers "film language," the techniques filmmakers use to express ideas and emotions, in other words, to create "meaning.” The second looks at some major film movements, genres, and directors, concentrating on Classical Hollywood Cinema (American studio-made feature films from the 1930s to the mid 60s) as well as some major silent films and important foreign films. Required for Film Studies minors.

FLM 251.01 Film History, Part 2
CRN #5680
6:30 –8:30 T R
Dr. Sidney Rosenzweig
103 Edwards

FLM 301.01 Film Theory and Criticism            
CRN #4001
12:30 – 1:45 T R
Dr. Carter Soles
102 Edwards


From its inception in the late 1890s through the current impacts of digital technology, film as a medium has always been subject to intense scrutiny and inquiry regarding its meanings, aesthetics, and social effects. This course will offer an overview of many of these debates, examining how film scholars and cultural critics have approached the interpretation of film (and other popular media). This class, therefore, will introduce you to the key terms, ideas, and discourses within the theory and criticism of film as a medium. Focusing primarily on the last 30 years of institutionalized film studies as an academic discipline, this course will offer you a set of interpretative tools and analytical frameworks not only for your future academic study of film but for your everyday consumption of film and other media. We will pay particular attention to the application of theory and criticism: how do you take the broad ideas of theory and use them in your own interpretations? How do you take the specific interpretations of criticism and develop a broader argument that can be applied to other texts? To that end, we will examine both historically significant films as well as more contemporary films in our examination of film and “meaning.”

FLM 360.01 Film Genres: The Western
CRN #5571
3:30 – 4:45 T R
Dr. Carter Soles
120 Hartwell

The western is Hollywood’s oldest, richest, and most enduring film genre, and, in its embrace of “the myth of the frontier,” is arguably the most significant cultural form influencing American ideology and cultural values. According to Douglas Pye, “The western is founded on a tremendously rich confluence of romantic narrative and archetypal imagery modified and localized by recent American experience – the potential source of a number of conflicting but interrelated streams of thought and imagery. [. . .] [By] the end of the nineteenth century, there is no possibility of disentangling the confused and conflicting impulses within the tradition" (208, 209). This course examines the historical, thematic, and theoretical parameters of the Western, examining those “confused and conflicting impulses” in the genre to find out what they tell us about film form, American culture, and genre film production. We will view many of the most “canonical” Westerns, engaging with “close readings” of the films and their formal properties in order to test how the texts themselves reflect both the cultural concerns of their day and the Western generic tradition in general.

FLM 457.01 Women and Film
CRN #5572
6:30 – 7:45 T
6:30 – 9:15   R
Dr. Carter Soles
26 Hartwell

This class explores the relationship between women, cinematic representation, film production, pleasure, and power. We will investigate the complex representation of women in mainstream Hollywood cinema, independent and experimental cinema, and selected international cinemas. The course will primarily emphasize films made by women filmmakers, asking questions about a possible feminist aesthetic and how/why/if films made by women address women’s issues within the patriarchal global film industry. We will explore issues of female stars and celebrities, as well as the role of women as spectators and consumers of commercial media. Throughout, we will use the debates surrounding feminism and “post-feminism” to frame our examination of women’s relationship to cinema, analyzing the complex ideological negotiations at play as gender relations continually adapt to shifting cultural and social circumstances.

Last Updated 10/28/13

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