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Brockport / Environmental Science / Graduate Program / Current Students

Current Graduate Students

 


2013 Graduate Students in the Department of Environmental Science and Biology

Katelyn Almeter 

Katelyn Almeter

I am originally from Hilton, NY.  I received my bachelor's in Environmental Science from Franklin & Marshall College (Lancaster, PA).

I am interested in how natural and anthropogenic aspects of the environment impact nature and human health.   

Becca Bernacki

Becca Bernacki

Undergraduate degree from The College at Brockport, SUNY with a major in Environmental Science and Biology

My area of interest is plant ecology, specifically invasion ecology and carbon cycling.

Josh Crolund

Josh Crolund

BS in Wildlife Biology from University of Vermont in 2004

Area(s) of interest: Bat Ecology, Human/Wildlife Interactions, Wildlife Corridor implementation and management

Andie Graham

Andie Graham

I attended Penn State University, where I earned degrees in Wildlife and Fisheries Science (AS 2008), Liberal Arts (BA 2009), and Earth and Mineral Science (BS 2011). 
I'm interested in wetland ecology; particularly how natural resources extraction impacts wetlands. 

Christina Hoh

Christina Hoh

I grew up in northern NJ and received my B.S. in Biology from RIT in 2011.  During my time as an undergrad, I volunteered at the RIT Bird Banding Station and spent a quarter interning at the Seneca Park Zoo.  Here at Brockport, I'm studying migration ecology of white-throated sparrows, focusing on physiology and behavior at lakeshore and inland stopover sites.  I'm also part of the Brockport research team for the Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Monitoring Plan, and spend my summers doing bird and amphibian surveys across Lake Ontario and Lake Erie.

Jenna Holzschuh

Jannalee Holzschuh

BS: Environmental Science and Biology (terrestrial ecology) from SUNY Brockport.

Avian migration biology (thesis: energetic condition and orientation of Zonotrichia albicollis near an ecological barrier)

John Bateman

John Bateman

Background location and major of BS – Environmental Science & Biology at The College at Brockport, SUNY
Area of interest - My research focuses on the local- and landscape-scale factors that affect calling amphibian use of stormwater retention ponds and artificial wetlands near developments in the Rochester, NY area.

Molly Stetz

Molly Stetz

Graduated from the College at Brockport with a major in Water Resources and minor in environmental science
My area of interest includes wetland ecology, especially looking at the hydrology and influences of climate change. My other interests include watershed resource planning and management using best management practices and restoration practices.
This was a picture taken during my DEC Wetland Technician internship during the summer of 2012. Here I was taking a day to assist the DEC and Cornell Graduate Students with trapping, GPS tracking, and releasing bears near Alfred, NY. Picture is attached. 

Aaron Heminway

Aaron Heminway

From Medina, NY. Undergrad B.S. from Brockport in ES&B, Terrestrial Ecology. Combined degree program. Currently a Wetland Ecology M.S. candidate under Dr. Wilcox, expected 2013. Research focuses on the spread of the invasive cattail, Typha x glauca, in Lake Ontario coastal wetlands in response to hydrology and phosphorus in relation to riparian buffers. Spent the last two summers in the field participating in the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. 

Dave S-K

Dave Sanderson-Kilchenstein

Dave earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland, College Park in Environmental Science and Policy; Conservation Biology and Biodiversity in 2008.  He has internship experience in host specialization of caterpillars, large mammal surface bone assemblages in Yellowstone N.P., and has worked for a non-profit organization that certifies corporate wildlife habitat enhancement programs, the Wildlife Habitat Council.  He also worked in Dr. Arthur Popper’s lab at the U. of MD testing the effects of intense sound on juvenile Chinook salmon. 

Dave’s thesis work here at SUNY Brockport is on the bowfin, Amia calva.  The bowfin represents the only surviving member of an ancient lineage of early bony fishes, and yet very little is known about their life history, population status, and potential in aquaculture.  The sale of bowfin roe in the southern US is growing exponentially, selling for $80/lb, and the harvest of wild bowfin may be unsustainable since the fish can live up to 30 years.  Located at the aquaculture ponds, Dave has designed and built a 3,000 gallon recirculating aquaculture system in order to study these fish in captivity.  Several tanks are devoted to hopefully being the first to breed these fish in captivity, and the remaining tanks are being used for a growth experiment testing the effect of different diets on growth, which will also be the first to document bowfin accepting an artificial feed. 

Julia York

Julia York

I grew up in Glasgow, Kentucky.  I graduated from Warren Wilson College in Asheville, NC with a BS in Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry (Biochemistry concentration).

 I'm pursuing a MS in Environmental Science and Biology with a concentration in Terrestrial Ecology.  For my thesis research project, I'm investigating the effects of competition, nutrient availability, and habitat on the growth of common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica L.), an invasive shrub, in western New York.

 

 

 

 

 

Last Updated 6/3/13

News

Dr. Chris Norment has had his fourth book of creative nonfiction accepted for publication by the University of North Carolina Press. Tentatively entitled "In the Fullness of Time," the book interweaves memoir with an exploration of issues related to the evolution and conservation of rare and endangered species in the Death Valley region. The book will be published in 2014.

Events

Environmental Seminars:    

‘A Population Study and Management Suggestions for the Henslow's Sparrow (Ammodramus henslowii) at Fort Drum, NY’

Ariel Kirk

Defense Thesis Seminar

Wednesday, Aug 20th

Noon to 1:00 PM

Lennon Hall, room 218

 
‘Habitat selection by calling amphibians breeding in stormwater ponds: ecology, models, and management implications’

John Bateman

Defense Thesis Seminar

Thursday, Aug 21st

1:30 to 2:30 PM

Lennon Hall, room 218

 

Dept of Env Sci & Bio Hours: 

Monday-Friday, 8am - 3pm

Secretary: Deb Dilker

Contact: 585.395.5975