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MA in History / Program Requirements and Options

MA in History / Program Requirements and Options
(For students matriculated from Fall 1999 - Spring 2009)

General Requirements:

  • The MA in History is a 33-credit degree program.
  • Up to 12 credits of graduate course work with a grade of “B” or better may be transferred from other institutions with the approval of the Graduate Committee.  Courses presented for transfer credit must have been taken within the past five years.
  • Students must have at least a “B” average in their graduate course work to be eligible for graduation. Those with GPAs below 3.0 will be placed on academic probation. Two semesters with GPAs below 3.0 may result in dematriculation from the program. 
  • All courses must carry graduate credit (500 or above). At least half of the courses must be at the 600 level or above, not including history 710. 
  • Degree requirements must be completed within five years of the date of matriculation. 

The MA Curriculum:

  • HST 600 - Introduction to Historical Studies:
    This required introductory course is designed to acquaint students, at the beginning of their MA work, with the recent major approaches to historical inquiry.

  • HST 691/695 - Required Research Course:
    Research in American or Research in World History: An individualized research experience which allows students to develop skills in original scholarly research and to explore the methods and resources appropriate for a selected area of investigation.  Must be arranged in consultation with a faculty member prior to registration.  Should be done prior to the capstone course.

  • Choice of Three Tracks:
    You will need to choose between three tracks to complete your major field.  Each of them involves several reading seminars, a research experience, and electives.

  • #1 - American History Track:
    Two required seminars plus three electives.

    Course Description:

    Credits:

    HST 614

    Reading Seminar in Early America

    3

    HST 615

    Reading Seminar in Modern America

    3

    HST 691

    Research in American History

    3

    HST XXX

    Elective in American History

    3

    HST XXX

    Elective in American History

    3

    HST XXX

    Elective in American History

    3

  • #2 - World History Track:
    Two required (but flexible) seminars plus three electives.

    Course Description:

    Credits:

    HST 64X

    Regional Seminar

    3

    HST 64X

    Regional Seminar

    3

    HST 695

    Research in World History

    3

    HST XXX

    Elective in World History

    3

    HST XXX

    Elective in World History

    3

    HST XXX

    Elective in World History

    3

  • #3 - American / World Track:
    Two required (but flexible) seminars plus six electives.

    Course Description:

    Credits:

    HST 614/15

    Reading Seminar

    3

    HST 64X

    Regional Seminar

    3

    HST 691/95

    Research in World / American History

    3

    HST XXX

    Elective in World History

    3

    HST XXX

    Elective in World History

    3

    HST XXX

    Elective in World History

    3

    HST XXX

    Elective in American History

    3

    HST XXX

    Elective in American History

    3

    HST XXX

    Elective in American History

    3


    Note: Regional Seminars on Europe, East Asia, Latin America and others rotate.  One is taught each semester. HST 614 is taught in the fall, HST 615 in the spring.  These courses cannot be taken as Directed Studies.

  • The Minor Field (9 credits):
    American or World tracks have a three course minor that can be constructed in a variety of ways.  The most common choice is either world or American history. Other choices include, but are not limited to: public history, women/gender history, military history, Atlantic World, revolutions.  Students may also take up to nine credits in graduate courses outside of history and apply them to an interdisciplinary minor field, such as English, education, women’s studies or study abroad.  You can be quite flexible and imaginative in designing minor fields.  All students should take at least one course outside their major field area.

Capstone Courses:
A Capstone Experience will serve to integrate your MA program.
You may choose one of two options:

HST 700 - Historical Integration (3 credits):
In the final semester of your program, you will undertake an integrative essay.  This involves selecting a committee of two faculty members who will meet with you and develop a question or set of questions tailored uniquely to your own work in the program. The questions will draw upon and cut across the various courses you have taken and provide an occasion for you to integrate your graduate work.  Here is your opportunity to transcend particular courses and explore broad themes in an integrative fashion.  An oral component will provide for an extended conversation between you and your faculty committee about your integrative essay.  The essay is graded. A contract is required and a passing grade of a "B" or better is necessary to complete the MA.

HST 701 - Master's Thesis (6 credits):
Some students may wish to focus their graduate studies more heavily toward research by writing a master's thesis.  Usually, such a thesis emerges out of work begun in the required research course in American or world history. It is directed by a particular faculty member and read by a “second reader.” Successful completion of the thesis, including an oral examination, is required for graduation for those choosing this option. A contract is required for the thesis and a passing grade of a “B” or better is necessary to complete the MA.

Other program possibilities (Electives)

HST 699 - Independent Study in History:
Allows student to do seminar readings from a course not being offered that semester or to investigate a new topic through secondary sources with a professor.  First semester graduate students may not take history 699.  Must be arranged in consultation a faculty member prior to registration.

HST 710 - College Teaching Practicum:
This course provides an opportunity to assist one of the faculty members in teaching at the introductory undergraduate level. It requires reading in the literature on current teaching practice and course development, and it involves participation in every aspect of college-level teaching--lecturing, leading discussions, preparing and evaluating exams and papers, tutoring students out of class, and more. The experience normally culminates in a pedagogical essay reflecting on the teaching experience.

HST 503 - Internships:
The department maintains relationships with a number of area institutions, particularly museums. We will sponsor appropriate internships and award credit for them when the needs of the institution intersects with a student’s interests and program. 

Overseas Study:
A few graduate students have pursued a portion of their program in foreign universities. The program is pleased to accept applicable work as transfer credit.

Last Updated 4/15/13

News

History major Gabrielle Brannigan received a scholarship to enter the MA program in Social Studies and Special Education at the University of Rochester's Warner School of Education.

Dr. Takashi Nishiyama has published a book, Engineering War and Peace in Modern Japan, 1868-1964 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014).

Dr. Takashi Nishiyama was interviewed by Mainichi, a major national newspaper in Japan, for the Oct. 3, 2014, issue.

The department hosted an NEH Workshop, Rochester Reform Trail, for K-12 teachers in July 2014.

History major Amy Freeman has published an article on the Eastman Dental Dispensary in the Democrat and Chronicle.

Dr. Takashi Nishiyama was interviewed by Yomuiri, a major national newspaper in Japan.

Dr. Ken O'Brien has been named a SUNY Provost Fellow for the 2013-2014 year.

Dr. Bruce Leslie has been named a SUNY Distinguished Service Professor.

Events

The Malik Lecture will be held on Thursday, February 12, 2015, at 7:30 pm in the lecture hall (room 104) of the Liberal Arts Building.

The Robert Marcus Lecture will be held on Wednesday, April 15, 2015, at 7:30 pm in the lecture hall (room 104) of the Liberal Arts Building.