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Undergraduate Studies Catalog (1999-2001)


Department of Physical Education and Sport

B212 Tuttle North
(716) 395-5332

Chairperson: Francis X. Short; Distinguished Service Professor: Joseph P. Winnick, Ed.D.; Professors: Merrill J. Melnick, William F. Stier Jr.; Associate Professors: Donald Murray, Reginald T.-A. Ocansey, Short, Dan Smith; Assistant Professors: Heidi K. Byrne, Marilyn L. Colby, Luz M. Cruz, Nat R. Goodhartz, Alun R. Hardman, Timothy J. Henry, Cathy Houston-Wilson, Lauren J. Lieberman, Susan C. Petersen, Danny Too; Visiting Assistant Professors: Robert C. Schneider, Moira E. Stuart; Lecturers: Michele Carron, Brian Dickinson, Marie Durham, Anne Fowler, Gregory A. Kenney, Peter Matthews, Rocco P. Salomone, Joan Schockow; Athletic Trainers: Lee Cohen, Susan Wielgosz, Michael Militello.

Programs in Physical Education and Sport

The major in physical education and sport provides opportunities for the study of physical activity including sport, exercise, play, and other physical activities. The academic major curriculum provides students with an opportunity to know how and why a physical activity-enriched lifestyle contributes to the good life. The curriculum provides numerous opportunities for students to participate and reflect upon their personal experiences in physical activity. The aim of the physical education major curriculum is to graduate students who are "physically educated." As such, the core of the major is focused on the study of motor skill and physical fitness. Students learn the principles of acquiring skill and fitness, seek to improve their own levels of skill and fitness, and learn to appreciate the contributions of skill and fitness to human development. Students complete the academic major b y selecting courses which cover disciplinary content most relevant to their professional (or non-professional) interests.

 The department prepares its graduates for careers as physical education teachers, adapted physical education teachers, coaches, athletic trainers, fitness consultants, exercise specialists, and admin istrators of sport-related programs and businesses. In addition to the 33-credit academic major, therefore, the department offers professional concentrations in: (1) teacher certification; (2) teacher certification and adapted physical education; (3) athletic training; (4) sports management; and (5) exercise physiology. Teacher certification programs are offered only in conjunction with the major in physical education. The concentrations in athletic training, sport management, and exercise physiology are available to both physical education majors and non-majors. (Additional prerequisites may be required for students lacking a strong background in physical education.) The department also offers a minor in coaching. Since individuals who complete the teacher certification program in physical education are also certified to coach upon completion of their pro gram, the minor in coaching is directed to non-certification students (and is also open to non-majors). Of course, teacher certification students may select coaching courses as part of their program of study. Specific requirements for the major and for each special program are described below.

 Performance is a critical area of study within the department. Skill courses in a range of sports and exercise areas are available for majors and non-majors alike who want to develop skills for a lifetime of recreational enjoyment and personal health. A full schedule of activities--from ten nis, golf and racquetball to jogging, aerobics and weight training--is offered each semester. Physical education majors can utilize these courses to gain beginning, intermediate and advanced skills to strengthen their sport and exercise backgrounds.

 1. Academic Major in Physical Education (33 credits)

 a. Foundational Courses

 The foundational courses listed below are meant to guide prospective physical education major students in the selection of their General Education Breadth Component courses. Most are offered as recommended courses; only BIO 221 Survey of Anatomy and Physiology is required as a prerequisite. Several of the courses listed below satisfy College-wide Breadth Component requirements in the fine arts, humanities, and natural/mathematical sciences.

 The courses listed below, by addressing issues related to the body, movement, learning, and valuation, provide a valuable foundation for accomplishing the aim of the physical education major curriculum, namely, to graduate students who are "physically educated."

 (1) Basic Tools/Understandings Related to the Body
CHM 111 (A) Introduction to Chemistry (3)
(No prior knowledge of chemistry is assumed)
CHM 205 (A,L) College Chemistry (4)
BIO 281 (A,N) Elements of Human Biology (3)
(For non-majors)
BIO 221 (A,L) Survey of Anatomy and Physiology (3)

 (2) Basic Tools/Understandings Related to Movement
PHS 111 (A,N) General Physics I (3)
PHS 115 (A,L) General Physics I with Laboratory (4)
PHS 201 (A,L) College Physics with Laboratory (4)
PHS 211 (A,N) College Physics I (3)
DNS 225 (A,P) Movement and Self-Awareness (3)

 (3) Basic Tools/Understandings Related to Learning
PSH 110 (A,N) Principles of Psychology (3)
PSH 112 (A,L) General Psychology with Laboratory (4)
PSH 202 (A,H) Logic (3)
PSH 322 (A) Conditioning and Learning (3)

 (4) Basic Tools/Understandings Related to Valuation
PHL 102 (A,H) Introduction to Ethics (3)
PES 290 (A,H) The Ethics of Fair Play in Sport and Life (3)
PES 291 (A,F) Beauty in Movement (3)

 b. Required Academic Core Courses: (21 credits)

 The major in physical education consists of 21 credits of specific required courses plus 12 credits chosen from a list of approved elective courses:

 Credits
PES 305 Significance of Physical Activity 3
PES 315 Fitness for Healthful Living 3
PES 325 Kinesiological Bases for Exercise and Sport 4
PES 335 Physiological Bases for Exercise and Sport 4
PES 345 Skill Acquisition and Performance 4
PES 3XX Advanced Performance 3

 Total: 21

 c. Elective Courses: (12 credits)

 Students in each of the professional concentrations will complete the physical education major by taking 12 semester hours of upper division liberal arts electives identified by the professional concentration.

 Students in each of the professional concentrations may not exceed six credits of elective, upper division, liberal arts performance courses for the completion of the academic major. Additional performance electives include both advanced sport and honors performance courses. Credits

 PES 3XX Advanced Performance 3
PES 340 Sport and Society 3
PES 350 History of Sport, Play, and Exercise 3
PES 360 Philosophy of Sport, Play, and Exercise 3
PES 399 Independent Study 1-3
PES 410 Physiology of Exercise 3
PES 411 Introduction to Sport Medicine 3
PES 412 Sport Medicine 3
PES 413 Human Growth and Development 3
PES 414 Assessment in Physical Education and Sport 3
PES 416 Lab Techniques in Exercise Physiology 3
PES 420 Biomechanical Skill Analysis 3
PES 430 Psychology of Sport 3
PES 440 Sociology of Sport 3
PES 445 Social Psychology of Sport 3
PES 446 Sports Spectating in the United States 3
PES 460 Ethics in Sport Contests 3
PES 461 Theories of Play 3
PES 475 Physical Education Honors-Performance 1-3
PES 485 Physical Education Honors-Theory 1-3
PES 490 Physical Education Exchange Program 15
PES 495 Topics in Physical Education 1-3
PES 499 Independent Study 1-3

 d. Contractual Liberal Arts Physical Education Major
The Contractual Liberal Arts Physical Education Major (CLAPEM) is an option that permits the student to design an individualized physical education major program drawn from the total aca demic offerings of the Department of Physical Education and Sport. This option is intended to accommodate the interests of physical education major students who choose not to apply to any of the department's professional concentrations. While the student is required to take the six course, 21-credit academic core, the remaining 12 credits are elective opportunities to be decided upon in consultation with the student's major advisor.

 2. Professional Programs

a. Teacher Certification
The competency-based teacher preparation program leads to provisional certification to teach physical education in grades K through 12 in New York state. 51 To complete the program, students must acquire a number of competencies (skills, knowledges and attitudes) while completing the major in physical education and several additional requirements. Thus, students must complete the academic core in the physical education major (21 hours) plus the following:

 1. Required Courses for the Elective Component in the Major (12 credits)
Credits
PES 413 Human Growth and Development 3
PES 414 Assessment in Physical Education and Sport 3
PES 420 Biomechanical Skill Analysis 3
PES Elective 3

 Total: 12

 2. Required Professional Sequence (24 credits)
Credits
PEP 441 Introduction to Teaching Physical Education 3
PEP 442 Secondary Instruction and Methods 3
PEP 444 Elementary Instruction and Methods 3
PEP 445 Adapted Physical Education 3
PEP 476 Teaching/Coaching Seminar 2
PEP 477 Elementary Student Teaching 5
PEP 478 Secondary Student Teaching 5

 Total: 24

 3. Required Cognate Courses (3 credits)
Credits
HLS 210 First Aid and CPR for Coaches 1
HLS 370 Drug Education for Teachers 2

 Total: 3

 4. Other Requirements
(a) Pre-acceptance requirements
1. Obtain a grade of "C" or better in PEP 441
2. Complete a required application form
3. Demonstrate satisfactory progress on the health-related physical fitness requirements
4. Pay a College-mandated application fee

 (b) Pre-student teaching requirements
1. Demonstrate satisfactory completion of the health-related physical fitness test
2. Complete a student teaching application
3. Obtain a "C" or better in all professional courses (PEP 441, 442, 444, 445)
4. Obtain a grade of "C" or better in all intermediate activity classes
5. Obtain an overall Brockport GPA of 2.5 or better

 5. Skill Requirements
Through courses offered at SUNY Brockport or other colleges, or through other approved expe riences, students must acquire and demonstrate intermediate skill in at least eight activities (one selected from each of eight specified areas: aquatics, dance, gymnastics, individual/dual, individ ual/outdoor, racquet, team/indoor and team/outdoor), and advanced competency in two additional activities. (In essence, students must have at least intermediate ability in ten different performance areas prior to student teaching; i.e., one course from each of the eight intermediate level performance categories plus two advanced-level classes in the major. PES 315 is considered as one of the two advanced-level classes in the major.)

 6. Electives

 Each student is required to select a minimum of five credits from the list of courses below. The intent of these options is to offer the student opportunities to pursue special areas of interest and/or to develop new strengths in areas of limited experience.

 Credits
PEP 351 Coaching Sports 3
PEP 353 Administration of Intramurals 3
PEP 356 Taping and Modalities 3
PEP 357 Stress and Muscle Testing 3
PEP 3XX Coaching Clinic(s) 1
PEP 400 Microcomputers in Sport and Physical Education 3
PEP 481 Instructional Strategies in Adapted Physical Education 3
PEP 482 Adapted Physical Activity and Sport 3
PEP 483 Early Childhood Physical Edy. 3 Cr. Every Semester.
PEP 485 Adapted Physical Education Practicum 3
PEP 399 Independent Study 1-3
PEP 499 Independent Study 2
DNS 482 Teaching Dance at the Secondary Level 3
DNS 483 Children's Dance 3
DNS 484 Methods of Teaching Dance at the Elementary Level 3

 b. Adapted Physical Education Concentration
The concentration in adapted physical education prepares the student for a position in the field, provides a background for graduate study and offers elective opportunities for physical education majors. It is available to students who have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. Students must apply for admission into the concentration.

 The concentration includes completion of the 31-credit physical education major, the teacher certification program in physical education and the 12-credit adapted physical education pro gram listed below. Several prerequisites/corequisites and courses in the adapted physical education program may be completed in meeting requirements for the physical education major and teacher education certification program.

 Credits
1. Major and Certification Prerequisites/Corequisites
Academic major in physical education 33
Teacher certification program in physical education 24

 2. Course Prerequisites/Corequisites
PES 413 Human Growth and Development 3
PES 445 Adapted Physical Education 3
PSH 101 General Psychology 3
or
PSH 110 Principles of Psychology

3. Adapted Physical Education Program
PEP 481 Instructional Strategies in Adapted Physical Education 3
PEP 482 Adapted Physical Activity and Sport 3
PEP 483 Early Childhood Physical Education
or
EDI 321 Understanding the Exceptional Learner 3
PEP 485 Adapted Physical Education Practicum 3

 (PEP 485 may be waived if at least 50 percent of the 10-credit student teaching requirement for teacher certification involves pupils with unique physical education needs)

 c. Sport Management Concentration
This program prepares students for a career in the management of sports in profit and nonprofit organizations. The sport management concentration includes a core of 15 credits and 12 credits in cognate courses related to each student's special professional interests. Cognate courses may be taken in a variety of departments. Students applying for and continuing in the sport management program must have and maintain, for the duration of the program, an overall GPA of 2.0, and must complete a major in physical education or another academic area. Students must com plete an internship experience in sport management. The internship requires the equivalent of one-half a semester working full-time, one semester working half-time, or a summer experience. Students must be prepared to meet all transportation and living expenses while interning.

 For Physical Education Majors and Non-Physical Education Majors

 1. Sport Management Core (required-15 credits)
(A 2.2 GPA must be maintained in the Sport Management Core)
Credits
PEP 360 Introduction to Sport Management Theory 3
PEP 460 Administrative Practices in Sport Management 3
PEP 461 Problems in Sport Management 3
PEP 467 Internship in Sport Management 6

 Total: 15

 2. Cognate Courses (required-12 credits)
Cognate courses are selected from business administration, computer science, communication, recreation, and public administration departmental offerings. Other courses may be chosen with departmental permission.

 Credits
ENG 308 Business Writing and Computers 3
Or
BUS 317 Introduction to Information System 3
BUS 335 Principles of Marketing 3
BUS 365 Principles of Management 3
BUS 366 Organizational Behavior 3
BUS 375 Business Law 3
BUS 435 Senior Conference in Marketing-Consumer Behavior 3
BUS 437 Promotional Policy and Sales Management 3
BUS 438 Marketing Channels and Logistics 3
BUS 439 Retail Management 3
BUS 465 Personnel Administration 3
CMC 312 Argumentation and Debate 3
CMC 316 Interpersonal Communication in Business and the Professions 3
CMC 332 Public Relations Principles and Practices 3
PEP 351 Coaching Sports 3
PEP 353 Administration of Intramurals 3
An Approved Statistics Course 3
An Approved Computer Literacy Course 3
PEP 399 Independent Study (with prior approval) 3

 Students majoring in physical education and also pursuing the Sport Management concentration must select an additional 12 semester hours (in addition to the 21 hours comprising the Academic Core) from the list provided below:

 PES 350 History of Sport, Play, and Exercise 3
PES 360 Philosophy of Sport, Play, and Exercise 3
PES 399 Independent Study 3
PES 430 Psychology of Sport 3
PES 440 Sociology of Sport 3
PES 445 Social Psychology of Sport 3
PES 446 Sports Spectating in the United States 3
PES 460 Ethics in Sport Contests 3
PES 485 Physical Education Honors-Theory 1-3
PES 490 Physical Education Exchange Program 15
PES 495 Topics in Physical Education 3
PES 499 Independent Study 1-3

 Plus other courses approved by the advisor of the sport management concentration

 In addition to taking 15 hours from the Sport Management Core and 12 hours from the cognate courses, non-majors must complete 9-12 credits from the academic major in physical education. It is recommended that students complete as many prerequisite courses as possible before taking PEP 360 Introduction to Sport Management. Students must complete three of the following courses (9-12 credits):

 Credits PES 305 Significance of Physical Activity 3
PES 315 Physical Fitness for Healthful Living 3
PES 325 Kinesiological Bases for Exercise and Sport 4
PES 335 Physiological Bases for Exercise and Sport 4
PES 345 Skill Acquisition and Performance 4
PES 3XX Advanced Performance 3
PES 350 History of Sport, Play, and Exercise 3
PES 360 Philosophy of Sport, Play, and Exercise 3

 In addition, non-physical education majors must complete an additional three credits from the following upper-division physical education courses for a grand total of 39-42 credits.

 Credits
PES 340 Sport and Society: Issues and Controversies 3
PEP 351 Coaching Sports 3
PEP 350 Scientific Foundations of Coaching 3
PES 392 Why People Play 3
PES 396 Women in Sport 3
PES 399 Independent Study 1-3
PES 3XX Advanced Performance 3
PES 430 Psychology of Sport 3
PES 440 Sociology of Sport 3
PES 445 Social Psychology of Sport 3
PES 446 Sport Spectating in the United States 3
PES 460 Ethics in Sport Contests 1-3
PES 485 Physical Education Honors-Theory 15
PES 490 Physical Education Exchange Program 3
PES 495 Topics in Physical Education 3
PES 499 Independent Study 3

 NOTE: Non-physical education majors must successfully complete the requirements for a major in another academic discipline offered at SUNY Brockport with the approval of the sport man agement coordinator.

 d. Athletic Training Concentration

Athletic Training is an allied health profession dealing with the prevention, recognition, management, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.  In this role, the athletic trainer can successfully decrease injury time and promote a quick, safe return to competition.  Certified Athletic Trainers (ATC’s) typically work in a variety of settings including colleges and universities, professional teams, high schools, and sports medicine clinics.  Recently, the recognition and demand for ATC’s has increased greatly due to the athletic and recreational nature of our society.

The undergraduate Athletic Training Program at SUNY Brockport is accredited through the Commission for Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP).  Athletic Training is a concentration within the Department of Physical Education and Sport.  The concentration is open to any major, although physical education is the most common choice of our students.  The program is carefully designed to meet competencies identified by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) and prepares students to successfully complete the NATA certification exam.  The program at Brockport is supervised by four Certified Athletic Trainers who all have teaching and clinical responsibilities.

Admission – Admission into the Athletic Training Concentration is competitive and requires formal application.  The admission procedure may be initiated during or after completion of PES 385 Basic Athletic Training and BIO 221 Survey of Anatomy and Physiology. 

The following must be completed prior to admission:

    1. Application for Admission to Athletic Training Program
    2. Copies of all previous transcripts:
     - Freshmen send high school and any college transcripts
     - Transfers send all college transcripts
    3. Provide two letters of recommendation from former or present supervising athletic trainer, team
        physician, instructor, coach, etc.
    4. Must possess a current G.P.A. of 2.5 or better on a 4.0 scale
    5. Must have attained a grade of “C” or better in all courses required for Athletic Training
    4. After completion of 1,2, 3,4, and 5 interview with Athletic Training Staff

Course requirements for the Athletic Training Concentration:

    HLS 210    First Aid and CPR for Athletics (2)
    HLS 301    Health and Wellness or 
            306 Contemporary Issues in Health (3)
    HLS 311 Nutrition (3) 
    PES 385 Basic Athletic Training (3) 
    PES 411 Advanced Athletic Training (3) 
    PES 412 Athletic Injury Assessment (3) 
    PEP 255 Taping for Athletic Training (1) 
    PEP 356 Therapeutic Modalities (3) 
    PEP 357 Muscle Testing (3) 
    PEP 358 Therapeutic Exercise (3) 
    PEP 359 Organization and Administration of AT (3) 
    PEP 471 Clinical Experience in Athletic Training I (1) 
    PEP 472  Clinical Experience in Athletic Training II  (1) 
    PEP 473 Clinical Experience in Athletic Training III (1) 
    PEP 474 Clinical Experience in Athletic Training IV (1) 
    BIO 221 Survey of Anatomy and Physiology (3) 
    BIO 321     Anatomy & Physiology I  or 
            322     Anatomy & Physiology II (4) 
    PES 310 Physiology of Exercise I (3) 
    PES 320 Kinesiology (3) 
    PSH 110 General Psychology (3) 

       Total 49 or 50 credits
 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:   The Athletic Training program at SUNY Brockport requires that all students in the concentration complete 1200 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a NATA-certified athletic trainer before taking the certification examination.  At SUNY Brockport, students are supervised by certified athletic trainers and by the team physician.  Students acquire their clinical hours through PEP 471-474, Clinical Experience in Athletic Training I-IV coursework.  These Clinical Experience classes are taken over a period of four consecutive semesters after acceptance into the program.

CERTIFICATION:  The National Athletic Trainers' Association Board of Certification (NATABOC) requires that all candidates seeking certification meet the following criteria:
    1. Complete two years' training (minimum of 800 clinical hours) under the supervision of a NATA 
        Certified Athletic Trainer
    2. Possess current First Aid and CPR certification
    3. Possess a bachelor's degree, and 
    4. Successfully complete the NATA examination 

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Contact: 
     Dr. Timothy Henry
    Athletic Training Program Director
    B355 Tuttle North
    SUNY Brockport
    Brockport, NY 14420
    (716) 395-5357
    e-mail: thenry@brockport.edu
 

 e. Exercise Physiology Concentration

 This concentration prepares students for graduate study in exercise physiology and for employ ment in clinics, fitness corporations, industrial settings, and sport research centers. It will also prepare students for certification exams conducted by the American College of Sports Medicine, Aerobics Institute, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and International Dance in Education Association.

 Upon completion of the required course work, students must apply for acceptance into the internship component of the program. Assignment to an internship site is based upon meeting the following criteria:

 * minimum concentration GPA of 2.5 or above,

* minimum of a "C" grade in each course, and

* satisfactory performance in an interview and oral exam conducted by the exercise physiology faculty.

Course Requirements
For Physical Education Majors
Academic core in the physical education major (21 hours) plus elective component in the major (12 hours) and professional concentration (29-31 hours).

 1. Required Courses in the Elective Component of the Major (12 credits)
Credits
PES 360 Philosophy of Sport, Play, and Exercise Electives 3
Students may elect any three upper-level PES electives except 9
PES 410 and PES 416

 2. Professional Concentration (29-31 credits)
(a) Corequisites (8 credits)
CHM 205 College Chemistry I 4
CHM 206 College Chemistry II 4

 (b) Required Exercise Physiology Core (12 credits)
PES 410 Physiology of Exercise II 3
PES 416 Lab Techniques in Exercise Physiology 3
PEP 361 Cardiac Rehabilitation 3
PEP 458 Internship 3

 (c) Electives (9-11 credits)
PES 343 Advanced Weight Training 3
BIO 321 Anatomy and Physiology I 4
BIO 322 Anatomy and Physiology II 4
BIO 466 General Endocrinology 3
BIO 467 Biochemistry I 3
BIO 468 Biochemistry II 3
CHM 305 Organic Chemistry I 4
CHM 306 Organic Chemistry II 4
HLS 311 Nutrition 3
MTH 201 Calculus I 3
CSC XXX Computer Programing 3
An approved statistics course 3

 For Non-Physical Education Majors
In addition to meeting all requirements described above under (2) Professional Concentration, non-majors also must complete the following:
BIO 221 Survey of Anatomy and Physiology 3
PES 325 Kinesiological Bases for Exercise and Sport 4
PES 335 Physiological Bases for Exercise and Sport 4

 f. Minor in Coaching Athletics

 The regulations of the Commissioner of Education of the New York State Department require individuals who coach an interscholastic athletic team to complete an approved program for coaches prior to or within the first three years of their employment. (Valid first aid, CPR and child abuse certificates are requird for initial employment.)

 The SUNY Brockport coaching minor, which is designed for students who are not in the physical education teacher certification program, fulfills this requirement and also provides greater depth in preparation for prospective coaches in schools, sports clubs, community programs, colleges, or other athletic organizations.

 Required Courses: Credits
PEP 351 Coaching Sports 3
PEP 352 Scientific Foundations of Coaching 3
PEP 3XX Coaching Clinics (3 required) 3
PEP 3XX Advanced Performance 3
HLS 210 First Aid and CPR for Coaches 2
(or an approved substitute course from a community agency such as the American Red Cross)
PEP 354 Coaching Practicum 4

 Total: 18*

 *Plus a state approved child abuse class/workshop (typically 2-3 clock hours in length).

 Physical Education Major Courses

 PES 200 Computers in Physical Education and Sport (A). The course offers a basic understanding of the general use of computers in the information age and in the student's chosen profession, as well as a hands-on introduction to computer applications, to do problem-solving activities in sport-related areas. 3 Cr. Fall.

 PES 290 The Ethics of Fair Play in Sport and Life (A,H). Enables students to examine and under stand fair play as a moral concept, and to develop students' abilities to ascertain the demands of fair play in sports contests and other applicable life situ ations. Provides for clarification and evaluation of different types of reasons for action, examination of different standards for fair action, and an opportunity to evaluate fair actions in areas of interest to students. Gives attention to the evaluation of moral maturity. 3 Cr.

PES 291 Beauty in Movement (A,F). Provides an introduction to the aesthetic and artistic dimensions of sport, dance, play and the human body. Focuses on an analysis of drawing, painting, sculpture, liter ature, photography, film and dance in an attempt to understand movement as an art. In addition, examines various cultural values reflected in movement art from prehistoric to contemporar y times. 3 Cr.

PES 305 Significance of Physical Activity (A). Discussion of the intrinsic and extrinsic values of physical activity across the lifespan from philosoph ical and historical perspectives; critical analysis of the contribution physical activity makes to healthful living, personal pleasure, self-knowledge, and the liberating consequences of skill acquisition; identification of major societal trends impacting on physical education and sport and their implications. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 315 Physical Fitness for Healthful Living (A). Corequisite: PES 335. Emphasis on developing health-related components of physical fitness through physical activity. Student gains understand ing of how physical activity enhances health-related physical fitness. Includes laborator y. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 325 Kinesiological Bases for Exercise and Sport (A). Prerequisite: BIO 221. Involves study of the anatomical bases of movement in exercise and sport and application of kinesiological principles to movement and sport-specific skills. Laborator y experiments provide opportunity for the analysis of exercise and sport from both anatomical and mechanical perspectives, muscle roles, types of muscle contractions, movement sequencing, and mechanical analysis. 4 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 335 Physiological Bases for Exercise and Sport (A). Prerequisite: BIO 221. Focuses on the physiological bases of active living. Addresses functional capacity of the human body to adjust to demands of work entailing various duration, inten sities and technical requirements. All age populations will be considered, as well as both genders. Comparisons will be made between sedentary and nonsedentary or trained individuals. Individual lim itations to performance will be assessed, as well as possibilities for safely extending these limitations. Includes laboratory. 4 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 340 Sport and Society: Issues and Controversies (A). To encourage students to ask questions and think critically about sports and to discover how sports are related to their social lives; discussion of how research and theor y drawn from sociology of sport contributes to a better understanding of several sport-related issues and controversies; emphasis on sports and sport-related behaviors as they occur in social and cultural contexts; emphasis on making sports more democratic and sport participation more accessible to all people. 3 Cr.

PES 345 Skill Acquisition and Performance (A). Focuses upon the study of the acquisition and performance of motor skills emphasizing relevant con cepts from motor learning and sport psychology. Students are provided with opportunity to learn new sport skills. Includes laborator y. 4 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 350 History of Sport, Play and Exercise (A). Corequisite: PES 360. Provides a broad look at the history of physical activity from ancient to modern times, and the effects of social institutions (e.g., war, religion, politics) on the development and role of sport in the Western world. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 360 Philosophy of Sport, Play and Exercise (A). Corequisite: PES 350. Examines descriptive characteristics of sport, play, exercise, games and, to a lesser extent, dance; value and sport, play, exercise and games; and the conception of mind/body and the valuational consequences. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 385 Basic Athletic Training (A). Corequisite: BIO 221. Focuses on the fundamental knowledge of sports injuries and their care. I ntroduces and explains various techniques in treatment, prevention and rehabilitation of sports injuries. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 391 Stress and Tension in Modern Life: Its History and Relief (A,I). Thoroughly evaluates con cepts of stress and tension in terms of their philo sophic bases (mind-oriented, body-oriented or interactional models), and supported by evolution ary explanations of physical, mental and cultural phenomena contributing to a variety of stress and tension-related disorders. Critically evaluates con temporary approaches in therapy designed to impact upon stress and tension, enabling the student to con struct a personal coping strategy. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 392 Why People Play (A,I). Helps students accomplish four objectives: 1) utilize knowledge gained from a variety of disciplines to understand and explain the nature and purpose of human play; 2) increase capacity to observe and analyze play in common human behavior; 3) understand the potential values of play for people; and 4) experience and analyze methods for "producing" play. 3 Cr.

PES 396 Women in Sport (A,W,I). Cross-listed as WMS 396. Examines the historical, contemporary and future perspectives of women in sport. Reviews insights from history, psychology and sociologyrelated to women in sport, as well as athletes' per ceptions of their performance. Focuses on information and issues which are fundamental to understanding women's participation in sport. 3 Cr.

PES 399 Independent Study (A). To be defined in consultation with the instructor-sponsor and in accordance with the procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 1-3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 410 Physiology of Exercise (A). Prerequisite: PES 335. Examines the physiologically related effects of sport activities on the bodyÕs systems, including fatigue, strength, flexibility; physiological responses of the body before, during and after training; scientific research in exercise physiology; and the use of lab equipment for sport physiology. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 411 Advanced Athletic Training (A). Prerequisite: PES 385. Covers muscles, tendons and liga ments, and the injury mechanism involved in given injuries for each major articulation of the body; inflammatory responses and wound healing; the effects of locally applied heat and cold on each; prevention, care and reconditioning techniques for sport injuries; and methods used during each phase of injury conditioning-reconditioning. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 412 Athletic Injury Assessment (A). Prerequisite: PES 411. Focuses on various anatomical/ physiological systems of the human body as they relate to athletic injur y. E mphasizes identifying anatomical structures and landmarks in the human body, as well as recognizing and assessing injuries occurring during athletic participation. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 413 Human Growth and Development (A). Focuses on the relationship between physical activity and selected aspects of physiological, psychological, intellectual and social growth and development. Investigates atypical, as well as typical, human con ditions influencing movement. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 414 Assessment in Physical Education and Sport (A). Designed to measure and evaluate performance in physical activity and sport. Includes content related to understanding and applying the following criteria when selecting tests: purpose, types, technical adequacy, nondiscriminatory con siderations, economy, and flexibility. Students will also learn basic statistical protocols used to analyze and interpret test data. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 416 Lab Techniques in Exercise Physiology (A). Prerequisites: P ES 335 and MTH 121 or instructor's permission. Provides experiences in the measurement of acute and chronic adaptations to exercise, the use of technology in the measurement and assessment of physiological functioning during such conditions, and the maintenance and calibration of such equipment. 3 Cr.

PES 420 Biomechanical Skill Analysis (A). Prerequisite: PES 325. Focuses on the observation, analysis, and description of movement skills. E mphasizes qualitative analyses, including descriptive systems, and the application of basic laws and principles of physics; and recognition and correction of errors. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 430 Psychology of Sport (A). Studies the application of such psychological concepts as cognition, emotions, per ception and memor y to sport and sport participation. Discusses factors such as motivational cognition, imager y and cognitive interventions. 3 Cr.

PES 439 Motor Learning (A). Acquaints students with the basic terminology , principles and factors influencing skill acquisition and performance in sport. Requires students to analyze a sport skill in an attempt to identify factors influencing performance and to develop a practice schedule optimizing their performance and acquisition of sport skills. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 440 Sociology of Sport (A). Sociological analysis (i.e., application of the sociological imagination, research methodologies and data-gathering techniques) of sport. Critically examines several student-selected discussion topics, each informed b y substantive areas of general sociology (e.g., culture, society, socialization, social institutions, inequality, deviance). Provides opportunities for student research. 3 Cr.

PES 445 Social Psychology of Sport (A). Study of the individual as an exercise and/or sport participant and the social influence processes which affect his or her self, behavior and performance. Emphasizes the social context in which the sport participants participate, and the influence social processes and significant others have on individual and group behavior. Topics include self-esteem, the coach-athlete dyad, audience effects, leadership, cohesiveness, and team building. 3 Cr.

PES 446 Sports Spectating (A). Provides an in depth, interdisciplinary study of the phenomenon of sport spectatorship in American society . Discusses selected topics pertaining to sports spectating from theoretical, empirical and experiential perspectives, e.g., spectator demographics, patterns of sport con sumption, sports spectating in popular culture, eco nomics of sports spectating, psy chology of sports fandom, and spectator violence. Provides opportunities for student-initiated sports event field trips. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 451 Multicultural Perspectives in Physical Education (A). Theoretical foundations for multicultural physical education are explored. Issues of race, class, and gender relative to physical activity are emphasized. I mplications of multiculturalism for physical education in culturally diverse settings are also discussed. 3 Cr.

PES 460 Ethics in Sport Contests (A). Increases skills in reading, writing, speaking and thinking philosophically; and provides a philosophical analy sis of significant historical and contemporary issues related to personal involvement in sport. 3 Cr.

PES 461 Theories of Play (A). Explores classical, contemporary and alternative theories of play; instances of playful activity; and strategies for increasing the human capacity to play. 3 Cr.

PES 475 Physical Education Honors-Performance (A). Prerequisite: Highly advanced perform ance skill in activity chosen. Emphasizes the refinement of one activity skill at the level of master. Theory work determined in consultation with instructor. 1-3 Cr.

PES 485 Physical Education Honors-Theory (A). Prerequisite: Highly advanced academic capabilities in area chosen. Provides for individual or small-group study on academic topics or problems determined in consultation with instructor. 1-3 Cr.

PES 490 Physical Education Exchange Program (A). Provides several opportunities for physical edu cation majors of at least junior status to spend one or more semesters studying in Canada (Dalhousie University), or at one of several overseas locations, e.g., Chelsea School of Human Movement (England), Dunfermline College of P hysical Education (Scot land), University of Ulster (Northern Ireland), or Zinman College of Physical Education (Israel). 15 Cr. Every Semester.

PES 495 Topics in Physical Education (A). To be defined by the instructor in accor dance with the specific topic to be covered that semester. May be repeated, but under another topic area in physical education. Additional information may be obtained from the department. 3 Cr.

PES 499 Independent Study (A). To be defined in consultation with the instructor-sponsor and in accordance with the procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 1-3 Cr. Every Semester. Professional Studies Courses

PEP 255 Taping for Athletic Training (B). Prereq uisite: PES 385; corequisite: PES 411. Provides the entry level athletic training student with knowledge of supplies utilized for taping and strapping in ath letics; provides instruction in functional application of taping and wrapping in order to prevent/reduce athletic injury. 1 Cr. Fall.

PEP 276 Softball Officiating (B). Spring

PEP 277 Volleyball Officiating (B). Fall

PEP 278 Basketball Officiating (B).

PEP 279 Football Officiating (B). Spring

Officiating courses are designed to enhance preparation of students to officiate sports and to enhance the ability to pass relevant local, state, and national certification exams. I ncludes lab experience. 1 Cr. Each.

PEP 281 Water Safety Instructor (B). Prerequisite: PEP 280. Provides for the analysis and correction of skills, sound teaching progressions, and learning proper techniques of swimming and life-saving skills. Successful completion results in R ed Cross Certification. 2 Cr. Fall.

PEP 282 Lifeguard Training (B). Improves life guarding skills necessary to save one's own life or the lives of others in the event of an emergency , in accordance with American Red Cross requirements. 2 Cr. Spring.

PEP 351 Coaching Sports (B). Covers the rules, duties, legal aspects and administrative methods of coaching an athletic team, and the philosophies, methods and strategies involved in coaching. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 352 Scientific Foundations of Coaching (B). For non-physical education majors who wish to develop a beginning understanding of the scientific foundations of coaching athletic teams. I ncludes exposure to the biological sciences, the psycho-social aspects of sport, as well as growth and development of athletes. Meets New York state requirements for Health Sciences A pplied to Coaching. 3 Cr. Fall.

PEP 353 A dministration of I ntramurals (B). Covers the philosophy of intramural sport organization and administration of an intramural activity , administrative problems, and current trends in intramural programming. 3 Cr. Fall.

PEP 354 Coaching Practicum (B). Prerequisites: All other coaching minor requirements or instructor's permission. Requires students to perform as mem bers of a coaching staff for one season; also requires goal setting and planning communication. 4 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 356 Therapeutic Modalities (B). Prerequi sites: HLS 211, 212, PES 385. Emphasizes the use and knowledge of various therapeutic modalities used in athletic training. Stresses a working knowl edge of each modality as well as its practical application. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 357 M uscle Testing (B). Prerequisites: PEP 356, PES 385, and PHE 411. Develops knowledge of muscle testing and joint stress testing in relation to athletic injuries. Provides experience in the training room and working with athletic teams. 3 Cr. Spring.

PEP 358 Therapeutic Exercise (B). Prerequisites: PES 385 and 411, and PEP 356 and 357. Provides extensive experience with an athletic team, includ ing applying techniques related to preventive, protection and emergency care measures. 3 Cr. Fall.

PEP 359 O rganization and A dministration of Athletic Training (B). Prerequisites: PES 385, 411, and 412, and P EP 356, 357, and 358. Provides intensive experience in athletic training in a seminar format. Examines athletic training room techniques, and the design of a training room facility including budget, equipment and supplies. 3 Cr. Fall.

PEP 360 I ntroduction to S port M anagement Theory (B). Examines the implications of management theory for sport organizations, and management considerations in retail, manufacturing, professional sports, sport services and athletic set tings. 3 Cr. Fall.

PEP 361 C ardiac R ehabilitation: Theory and Application (B). Prerequisites: BIO 221 and P ES 310 or theirequivalent. Studies physiological responses to exercise, graded exercise testing, and program prescriptions for prevention and rehabilitation. Provides experience in exercise tolerance testing and the reading of EKGs. 3 Cr. Spring.

PEP 379 Athletic Training for the Teacher/Coach (B). Focuses on the fundamental knowledge of ath letic injuries; their prevention and care. Introduces and explains various techniques in prevention and care of injuries, strength and conditioning, pre/in/off-season training, nutrition, taping and wound care. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

Coaching Clinics
PEP 381 Coaching Basketball (B).
PEP 382 Coaching Football (B).
PEP 383 Coaching Gymnastics (B).
PEP 384 Coaching Soccer (B).
PEP 385 Coaching Softball (B).
PEP 386 Coaching Swimming (B).
PEP 387 Coaching Volleyball (B).
PEP 388 Coaching Wrestling (B).

 For each coaching clinic: exposes students to sport specific aspects of coaching, including instructional techniques, strategies, conditioning, organizational techniques, and safety considerations, as appropriate. 1 Cr. Each.

 PEP 399 Independent Study (B). Prerequisite: Rel evant course in subject area. To be defined in consul tation with the instructor-sponsor and in accordance with the procedures of the O ffice of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 400 Computer A pplications to P hysical Education and Sport (B). Offers students a hands on introduction to the use of computers in sport performance analysis, individual sport-related hypertext application programs, brochures and fly ers, hypertext sport information links, and studying sport sites on the Internet. 3 Cr. Spring.

PEP 441 Introduction to Teaching Physical Edu cation (B). Focuses on factors which influence the development of a K-12 curriculum. Allows students to examine various curriculum models. P rovides opportunities for observing and learning about school. Examines variables associated with the teaching and learning process. Includes the use of observation instruments for systematic development of teaching skills. Includes laboratory/clinical field experiences. 2 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 442 S econdary M ethods and I nstruction (B). Prerequisite: PEP 441. Corequisite: PES 413. Allows students to develop a knowledge of current concepts and trends in secondary physical education and the ability to plan and implement a physical education program designed to meet the needs of middle school and high school y outh. Requires a field experience. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 443 Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education (B). Corequisite: PEP 441. Investi gates concepts of testing, measurement and evaluation in physical education. D iscusses test selection, construction, and administration. Also covers statistical concepts and microcomputer applications. 2 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 444 E lementary Methods and I nstruction (B). Prerequisites: PEP 441 and 442. Allows students to acquire the skills and knowledge for a fun damental foundation necessary for sequencing and teaching physical education activities in the elemen tary school setting. Requires a field experience. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 445 Adapted Physical Education (B). Prereq uisite: P EP 441; corequisite: PES 413. Develops a knowledge of current concepts and trends in adapted physical education and students' ability to assess, plan and implement a physical education program designed to meet the unique needs of individuals with disabilities. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 458 Internship in Exercise Physiology (B). Prerequisite: Completion of all work in the fitness con centration with a gr ade of "C" or better . Provides a supervised, practical experience in a fitness organization, including opportunities for students to participate in the day-to-day duties of a fitness organization and to observe techniques of medical personnel. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 460 Administrative Practices in Sport Man agement (B). Prerequisite: P EP 360. Covers the management functions involved in amateur, business, services, educational and professional sports organizations. Includes topics such as business pro cedures, legal and financial responsibilities, management of sporting events, health aspects, staff requirements and relationships, public relations, players recruiting and eligibility, employee relation ships, and leadership techniques. 3 Cr. Spring.

PEP 461 P roblems in S port Management (B). Prerequisite: PEP 360. Considers current problems in sport management in a seminar format. Requires solution of practical problems, and visits to sport facilities to consider management problems. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 467 Internship in Sport Management (B). Prerequisites: PEP 360 and one specialty course. Provides entr y-level experience in a selected sport organization, including participation in its day-to day duties and observation of higher level management operations. 6 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 471 Clinical Experience in Athletic Training I (B). Prerequisite: PES 385; corequisite: PES 411. Provides initial athletic training clinical experience. Focuses on the application of basic psy chomotor skills involved in the prevention, management, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries and the daily oper ation of the athletic training room. 1 Cr. Fall.

PEP 472 Clinical Experience in Athletic Training II (B). Prerequisite: PEP 471; corequisite: PES 412. Provides intermediate level athletic training clinical experience. Focuses on evaluation and management of athletic injuries as well as performing daily practice and game coverage for athletic teams. 1 Cr. Spring.

PEP 473 Clinical Experience in Athletic Training III (B). Prerequisite: PEP 472. Provides advanced level athletic training clinical experience. Focuses on evaluation and management of athletic injuries as well as the application of therapeutic modalities and therapeutic exercise in the rehabilitation of athletic injuries. In addition, daily practice and game cover age is included. 1 Cr. Fall.

PEP 474 Clinical Experience in Athletic Training IV (B). Prerequisite: PEP 473. Provides advanced level athletic training clinical experience. Focuses on organization and administrative aspects of athletic training, as well as interaction with other allied health personnel. Begins focus toward NATA certification exam. 1 Cr. Spring.

PEP 476 Teaching/Coaching Seminar (B). Provides the opportunity to discuss issues and problems which arise in student teaching. Also provides for coaching competencies to be met in the student teaching practicum, including such topics as plan ning, assessment and evaluation in a coaching environment. 2 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 477 Elementary Student Teaching/Coaching (B). Requires working cooperatively for a quarter in an elementary school with a master teacher and a college supervisor to achieve a variety of specified teaching competencies. 5 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 478 Secondary Student Teaching/Coaching (B). Requires working cooperatively for a quarter in a secondary school with a master teacher and college supervisor to achieve a variety of specified teaching competencies. 5 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 481 I nstructional S trategies in A dapted Physical Education (B). Corequisites: PEP 445 and PES 413 or equivalent. Provides a study of instructional strategies relevant and appropriate to adapted physical education. Emphasizes instruction for students with mental retardation, learning disabilities, and/or behavioral/emotional disabilities. 3 Cr. Fall.

PEP 482 A dapted P hysical A ctivity and S port (B). Corequisites: PEP 445 and PES 413 or equiva lent. Examines the effects of physical and sensor y disabilities on the physical/motor performance of children and youth. Emphasizes the effects of spinal cord injuries, cerebral palsy, and auditory and visual impairments. In addition, discusses implications for the selection and modification of appropriate activities. 3 Cr. Fall.

PEP 483 Early Childhood P hysical E ducation (B). Prerequisite: P ES 413; corequisite: P EP 445. Involves teaching physical education to children ages 0-5 with and without disabilities. Emphasizes assessment and program planning for an early child hood population. Incorporates a field experience to supplement lectures and discussion. 3 Cr.

PEP 485 Adapted Physical Education Practicum (B). Prerequisite: 50 clock-hours of volunteer work. Corequisite: PEP 481 and/or 482. Requires students to teach physical education under the supervision of a sponsor-teacher. May take place off-campus at a school or agency. Requires students to teach a mini mum of 90 hours and to utilize knowledge obtained in prerequisite and corequisite courses. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

PEP 499 Independent Study (B). Prerequisite: Rel evant course in subject area. To be defined in consul tation with the instructor-sponsor and in accordance with the procedures of the Office of Academic Advisement prior to registration. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

Physical Education Elective Skill Area Beginning skill courses are open to all SUNY Brockport students. E nrollment in intermediate and advanced skill courses is dependent on meeting entrance com petencies or instructor's permission. These courses provide expert instruction for the improvement of play for leisure time enjo yment, good health, or professional development. All skills courses listed below carry liberal arts (A) credits.

Beginning-level Courses

 AQUATICS Credits
PES 112 Beginning Diving 1
PES 114 Beginning Swimming (fall and spring) 1

 DANCE
PES 121 Aerobic Dance (fall and spring) 1
PES 122 Rhythmic Skills I (fall and spring) 1

 GYMNASTICS
PES 131 Beginning Gymnastics (fall and spring) 1

 INDIVIDUAL/DUAL
PES 141 Beginning Bowling (fee) 1
PES 142 Beginning Handball (spring) 1
PES 143 Beginning Weight Training (fall and spring) 1
PES 144 Beginning Fencing (spring) 1
PES 145 Beginning Ice Skating 1
PES 146 Beginning Judo (fall and spring) 1
PES 147 Tae Kwon Do 1

 INDIVIDUAL/OUTDOOR
PES 151 Beginning Archery 1
PES 152 Beginning Cycling 1
PES 154 Beginning Golf (fee) (fall and spring) 1
PES 155 Beginning Jogging (fall and spring) 1
PES 156 Beginning Skiing (fee) (spring) 1
PES 157 Beginning Track & Field (spring) 1

 RACQUET
PES 161 Beginning Badminton (fall and spring) 1
PES 162 Beginning Racquetball (fall and spring) 1
PES 163 Beginning Table Tennis 1
PES 164 Beginning Tennis (fall and spring) 1

 TEAM/INDOOR
PES 171 Beginning Basketball (fall and spring) 1
PES 172 Beginning Volleyball (fall and spring) 1

 TEAM/OUTDOOR
PES 181 Beginning Baseball 1
PES 183 Beginning Lacrosse 1
PES 186 Beginning Soccer (fall) 1
PES 187 Beginning Softball 1
PES 137 Beginning Field Hockey 1

 Intermediate Courses Credits

 AQUATICS
PES 212 Intermediate Diving 1
PES 213 Scuba Diving (fee) 2
PES 214 Intermediate Swimming (fall and spring) 1

 DANCE
PES 222 Rhythmic Skills II (fall and spring) 1

 GYMNASTICS
PES 231 Intermediate Gymnastics (fall and spring) 1

 INDIVIDUAL/DUAL
PES 241 Intermediate Bowling (fee) 1
PES 243 Intermediate Weight Training (fall and spring) 1
PES 244 Intermediate Fencing (spring) 1
PES 245 Intermediate Ice Skating 1
PES 246 Intermediate Judo (fall and spring) 1
PES 248 Intermediate Wrestling (spring) 1

 INDIVIDUAL/OUTDOOR
PES 251 Intermediate Archery (fall) 1
PES 252 Intermediate Bicycle Touring (spring) 1
PES 253 Intermediate Climbing/Backpacking 2
PES 254 Intermediate Golf (fee) (spring) 1
PES 255 Intermediate Distance Running 1
PES 256 Intermediate Skiing (fee) (spring) 1
PES 257 Intermediate Track and Field (spring) 1

 RACQUET
PES 261 Intermediate Badminton (fall and spring) 1
PES 262 Intermediate Racquetball (fall and spring) 1
PES 263 Intermediate Table Tennis 1
PES 264 Intermediate Tennis (fall) 1

 TEAM/INDOOR
PES 271 Intermediate Basketball (fall and spring) 1
PES 272 Intermediate Volleyball (fall and spring) 1

 TEAM/OUTDOOR
PES 281 Intermediate Baseball (fall) 1
PES 282 Intermediate Football (spring) 1
PES 283 Intermediate Lacrosse (spring) 1
PES 286 Intermediate Soccer (fall) 1
PES 287 Intermediate Softball 1
PES 237 Intermediate Field Hockey 1

 Advanced Courses Credits (meet requirements in major and certification programs)

 AQUATICS
PES 314 Advanced Swimming (spring) 3 

GYMNASTICS
PES 331 Advanced Gymnastics (spring) 3

 INDIVIDUAL/DUAL
PES 343 Advanced Weight Training (fall and spring) 3
PES 348 Advanced Wrestling (spring) 3

 INDIVIDUAL/OUTDOOR
PES 353 Advanced Climbing/Backpacking 3
PES 354 Advanced Golf (fee) (fall and spring) 3
PES 355 Advanced Distance Running 3
PES 356 Advanced Alpine Skiing (fee) (spring) 3

 RACQUET
PES 361 Advanced Badminton (fall) 3
PES 362 Advanced Racquetball (spring) 3
PES 364 Advanced Tennis (fall) 3

 TEAM/INDOOR
PES 371 Advanced Basketball (fall and spring) 3
PES 372 Advanced Volleyball (fall and spring) 3
PES 373 Advanced Ice Hockey 3

 TEAM/OUTDOOR
PES 381 Advanced Baseball 3
PES 382 Advanced Football (spring) 3
PES 386 Advanced Soccer (fall) 3
PES 387 Advanced Softball (fall) 3

 Athletic Elective Skill Area

 Please note: Each course in the athletic elective skill area can be taken only once for credit toward graduation requirements.

 ATH 200 Varsity Baseball (spring) 1
ATH 201 Varsity Basketball-Men (spring) 1
ATH 202 Varsity Cross Country-Men and Women (fall) 1
ATH 203 Varsity Football (fall) 1
ATH 206 Varsity Lacrosse 1
ATH 207 Varsity Soccer-Men (fall) 1
ATH 208 Varsity Swimming-Men and Women (spring) 1
ATH 210 Varsity Track and Field-Men and Women (spring) 1
ATH 211 Varsity Wrestling (spring) 1
ATH 212 Varsity Ice Hockey (spring) 1
ATH 221 Varsity Basketball-Women (spring) 1
ATH 224 Varsity Field Hockey (fall) 1
ATH 226 Varsity Gymnastics (spring) 1
ATH 229 Varsity Softball (spring) 1
ATH 230 Varsity Tennis (fall) 1
ATH 231 Varsity Volleyball (fall) 1
ATH 234 Varsity Soccer-Women (fall) 1

 Note: Participation in a varsity sport does not satisfy the advanced performance requirements in the major.


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