Graduate History Courses

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HST 501 American History: Topics (A). Provides an overview of selected topics in American history for teachers and nonspecialists interested in acquiring, updating or refreshing basic understanding. Topics vary yearly. May be repeated for credit. 3 Cr. Summer.

HST 502 Topics in American History -Research Intensive (A). Studies selected issues and topics according to student demand and faculty interest. Defined by the instructor in accordance with the specific topic offered that semester. Course requires the completion of a substantial research paper. 3 Cr.

HST 503 Graduate Internship (A). Entails field experience in an archive, museum, historical society or other institution that can provide a professionally valuable period of training closely related to the student's academic program. Arranged through the Graduate Committee. 1-3 Cr.

HST 504 Topics in World History (A). Considers the development of world history during the 20th century and introduces the study of several of its separate civilizations, such as India, China, Islam, Europe, Africa and America and topics such as gender, ecology, demography and war. 3 Cr.

HST 505 Topics in World History -Research Intensive (A). Studies selected issues and topics according to student demand and faculty interest. Defined by the instructor in accordance with the specific topic offered that semester. Course requires the completion of a substantial research paper. 3 Cr.

HST 507 American Environmental History (A). Examines the changing relationship between people and the natural environment over the course of American history. Focuses on how agriculture, resource extraction, nature conservation, industrial production, and urbanization and suburbanization created opportunities for an limitations on American economic and social activity. 3 Cr.

HST 508 Landmark US Supreme Court Decisions (A). Familiarizes students with central questions brought before the US Supreme Court, and analyzes how and when average people used the legal system to challenge the status quo and uphold their constitutional rights. We also see how politics played a role in determining the outcome and enforcement of various Supreme Court decision from 1800 to the present. 3 Cr. 3 Cr.

HST 511 History of New York State (A). Explores New York State history from the hegemony of the Iroquois to today, including New York as a microcosm of national experience, cultural pluralism, economic development and politics. 3 Cr. 3 Cr.

HST 512 Public History (A). This introduction to “public history” examines how historians preserve historical memory and convey the ‘mystic chords of memory’ to the public. After considering the challenges of popularizing specialized knowledge, students examine the work and techniques of archives, popular historical writing, historical societies, museums, and oral history. The course culminates with a ‘hands-on’ project in one of those areas. 3 Cr.

HST 514 The Salem Witch Crisis (A). Explores the various ways historians have sought to understand the most infamous witch-hunt in American history. Focuses on scholarship that explores the Salem Crisis so students can trace an unfolding historiography and compare various approaches to understanding this event. Demonstrates the contingent/contested nature of historical knowledge and investigates the process of historical inquiry. 3 Cr. Summer.

HST 515 Natives and Newcomers (A). Explores the context and consequences of Indian-European contact in North America (c. 1500-1840). Topics include the nature of pre-contact Native societies; the encounter of Indian and European cosmologies, economies, and methods of warfare; and the relationship between Indian-European contact and developing constructs of race, gender, and identity. 3 Cr.

HST 516 The Invasion of America, 1492 - 1774 (A). Prerequisite: HST 390 with a minimum grade of C or junior status with a GPA of 3.0. Examines the history of North America from the advent of European expansion to the collapse of Europe’s North American empires (c. 1400 – 1800). Focuses on cultural encounters and exchange between Indian, European and African peoples; European methods of colonization; the struggle for imperial domination in North America; and the evolution of colonial societies with particular emphasis on Britain’s North American colonies. 3 cr. 3 Cr.

HST 517 Amer Revolution:War,Gender,Race,Religion,Politics 1760-1800 (A). Covers the socio-political dimensions of American history from the beginning of the Revolution through the creation of the new nation, the Constitution, the emergence of national-level politics. 3 Cr.

HST 518 The Early Republic (A). Examines in depth the young American nation from 1800 to 1848, the ages of Jefferson and Jackson. Focuses on the market revolution and the transforming social and political changes that followed in its wake and prepared the way for Civil War. 3 Cr.

HST 519 Civil War and Reconstruction (A). Provides an intensive study of the Civil War era (1848-1877). Surveys the breakdown of the American institutions that led to the Civil War, followed by an examination of the war itself and its controversial aftermath in the Reconstruction era. 3 Cr.

HST 520 America from its Centennial to Pearl Harbor (A). Examines the period of dramatic change unleashed by America’s precipitous transformation from rural, agrarian, Protestant society into an urban-industrial giant reshaped by immigration. Explores the impact of these forces on the American economy, family life, religion, politics, education and international role. Ends on the eve of American entry in WWII after analyzing the impact of the Great Depression on the resulting New Deal. 3 Cr. 3 Cr.

HST 521 America Since 1929 (A). Uses the Depression as a watershed and then examines American society to the present. Features political change from Roosevelt to Reagan, foreign policy from Pearl Harbor to the present, and the evolution of popular culture since the 1920s. Also gives attention to economic and social developments, including the rise of the civil rights movement and the women’s and gay liberation movements. 3 cr. 3 Cr. Spring.

HST 522 History of American Education (A). Expecting education to cure social problems and shape cultural identities while promoting individual mobility and social cohesiveness, Americans have long placed education at the center of national life. Examines the evolution of American schools and educational beliefs within the context of social, cultural, political and economic change, and places American education into an international perspective. Prerequisite: HST211 or HST212. 3 Cr.

HST 526 American Cultural History 1865-Present (A). Examines the emergence of modern American culture between the late 19th and early 21st centuries. Focuses on how nationalism and war, race and gender, industrial production and consumption, science and technology, and mass education and entertainment affected the way Americans identified themselves and made sense of their world. 3 Cr.

HST 527 The Material Culture of Early America (A). Investigates material culture and lived experience in the United States through the 18th and 19th centuries. Defining material culture to include various aspects of Early Americans’ everyday lives, the course includes discussion and analysis of various topics: clothing production and consumption; the cultural construction of hygiene; the meaning and utility of lived spaces; interior furnishings and their relationship to users; amenities such as the lighting and heating of homes; cultural expressions such as art, music and print culture; the shaping and reshaping of urban and rural land, time and soundscapes; the theoretical frameworks through which historians interpret these cultural productions. 3 Cr. Spring.

HST 534 Modern Caribbean History: Puerto Rico/Cuba Since 1898 (A). As an advanced course, covers the French, Spanish and British Caribbean since the Haitian Revolution of the 1790s. Investigates how slavery and abolition, colonialism and nationalism, social and cultural movements, racism and dependency have forged this fascinating and paradoxical region. Considers questions of identity, especially for Afro-Caribbean women and men, in comparative framework. 3 Cr.

HST 537 Studies in Social Science: London (A). Sponsored by Brunel University and SUNY Brockport, enables students to live and to study for one semester in London. Examines the relationships between British and American society and history by means of lectures, discussions and field trips. Credit varies. Every Semester. 1-15 Cr.

HST 538 Women and Gender in Latin American History (A). Cross-listed as WMS 538. Examines at an advanced level the diversity of Latin-American and Caribbean women's experiences from Iberian conquest to the 20th century. Analyzes the gender dynamics of colonial, national, dictatorial, and revolutionary states, economies, and cultures, as well as the importance of women's movements and feminism. Discusses Latina history in the US and Latin-American and Caribbean masculinity in historical perspective. 3 Cr.

HST 539 "The Sex": American Women 1776 and After (A). "The Sex": American Women 1776 and After. The prescribed roles and the actual behavior of women during and after the American Revolution: courtship, marriage, marital fertility, economic productivity, community responsibilities, education, social interaction, public life and political engagement.Focus varies from semester to semester. Research Intensive. 3 Cr. Spring.

HST 540 Study in Mexico (A). Provides students with immersion in Mexican life and culture in Cuernavaca. Permits students to earn credits through the study of Spanish in small groups and through study of Mexican history, politics and culture. Enhances academic study with the experience of living with Mexican families. Credit varies. Spring. 1-15 Cr.

HST 541 World War I (A). Explores the Great War focusing on its causes, diplomacy, technology and medicine, social and cultural movements, women’s roles on the home front and war work, soldiers’ experience, as well as peace process and memory of the war. Students will produce a primary source research paper on their own as well as write shorter papers on the in-class reading. 3 cr. 3 Cr.

HST 542 War & Terrorism (A). Seminar discussing the meanings of and reasons for war and terror, and the linkages between them. 3 Cr.

HST 544 Medieval Women (A). Studies European Middle Ages, ca. 500-1500, particularly as women experienced them. Examines the perceptions medieval society fostered about gender; analyzes factors such as social class, work and professional status, legal structures, and sexuality and compares/contrasts their effect on women's and men's lives. 3 Cr. 3 Cr.

HST 545 The High Middle Ages (A). A study of the European experience from the First Crusade to the Black Plague, the general crises of the mid-14th century and the new institutions of a rapidly expanding European culture. 3 Cr.

HST 547 Revolutions and Revolutionaries in the Modern World (A). Investigates the critical role revolutions and revolutionaries have played in shaping the modern world from the late 18th through the 20th century. Using a comparative framework, it interrogates definitions and theories of revolution, explores who historically is attracted to revolutions, examines the historical processes which have converged to realize revolutions, and questions the types of societies, cultures and leaders revolutions have produced. 3 Cr. 3 Cr.

HST 548 The French Revolution (A). Considers the revolution's origins in the Old Regime and the Enlightenment before examining its political and cultural development as well as its immediate aftermath in the Napoleonic era and its influence on Europe in the 19th century. 3 Cr.

HST 552 Religion in American Civilization (A). Historical analysis of the role of religious ideas and movements as they have influenced and shaped the American experience and in turn been influenced by unique features of American life. 3 Cr. 3 Cr.

HST 553 Study Tour of Islamic Spain and Morocco (A). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any discipline, this study-tour introduces students to the rich cultural and historical legacy of the Islamic era in Spain, through visiting sites in Islamic Spain and Morocco, along with readings, lectures, cultural events and discussion. Tour includes visits to Cordoba, Seville, Granada and Toledo, as well as Tetuan, Fez and Tangier in Morocco. 3 Cr. Summer.

HST 555 The Black Death (A). The Black Death or "Plague" changed society, medicine, global trade, religion, and intellectual life from its outbreak in 1348 to 1700. As one microbe changed European society, it left in its wake a pessimistic fascination with death, but also a resolve to survive and discover causes and remedies for the plague, contributing to the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and Europe's transition to the modern. 3 Cr.

HST 558 Overseas Empires, 1800-Present (A). Offers a comparative look at the rise and fall of the major overseas empires of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, especially the British, French, and Japanese Empires. The course is organized thematically and considers issues of gender, race, culture, lived experience, colonial resistance, nationalism, and decolonization. It also addresses the lingering impacts of overseas imperialism in our world of today and public awareness of these histories. 3 Cr.

HST 560 Modern Africa (A). Surveys major patterns of pre-colonial Africa; examines the colonial experience and African struggles for independence; and explores the problem of "development" in post-colonial African states. 3 Cr.

HST 562 US - Asian Relations (A). The topic of this course is war and peace that involved Asia and the United States since the turn of the twentieth century. By focusing on the human, cross-cultural dimensions of various conflicts in the domestic and international scenes, this course will encourage students to develop an understanding of the experience of war and peace through reading, thinking, discussing, and writing. (Research Intensive) 3 Cr.

HST 567 Modern South Asia (A). Surveys the background of South Asian nations under European colonialism and the movement to independence. Also examines the post-independence problems of the area and the contemporary impact of these nations on the world. 3 Cr.

HST 570 Consumerism in Europe and the World, 1600-Present (A). Introduces students to a gendered interpretation of history of consumerism in a global context through the lens of literature, sociology, psychology and economics. Students will read novels, primary sources and articles pertaining to the history of shopping, advertising, fashion, globalization of trade and goods, and effects on workers. 3 Cr. 3 Cr.

HST 571 Islamic Spain: Histories and Legacies (A). This "reading-intensive" course introduces you to the political and cultural history of al-Andalus through studying some of the major secondary works on this remarkable era, as well as by exploring the rich heritage of literature and material culture that has survived and continues to influence both the Arab-Islamic and European civilizations in many ways. 3 Cr.

HST 572 Jihad (A). Designed to familiarize students with the roots of the concept of Jihad in the Qur'an, Traditions and Islamic Law, as well as historical examples that illustrate the various cultural-political meanings attaching to this complex and difficult subject. 3 Cr.

HST 573 The Middle East, Then and Now (A). Surveys the history behind current circumstances in the Middle East in a reading-oriented online format. Topics include Orientalism, the formation of Islam, the Ottoman Empire, women in the Middle East, and the problem of Palestine. 3 Cr.

HST 585 Museum Internship (A). Combines a ‘hands-on’ public history internship experience with classroom seminars for discussing readings and sharing experiences. Students will intern in local or regional archives, historical societies, historians’ offices, and museums. 3 cr. 3 Cr.

HST 587 Asian Survey (A). Surveys Asian cultures through films, slides, lectures, and textbooks. Using a chronological and regional approach, focuses on the unity and diversity of the peoples and cultures of China, South Asia, Southeast Asia and the Middle East. 3 Cr.

HST 599 Independent Study in History (A). Arranged in consultation with the instructorsponsor prior to registration. 1-3 Cr. Every Semester.

HST 600 Introduction to Historical Study (A). Explores the nature of historical knowledge and the means whereby that knowledge is achieved. Stresses the development and execution of a simple research design. Introduces students to modern historical scholarship. Should be taken early in a student's MA program. 3 Cr. Fall.

HST 601 Topics in American History (A). Provides a thematic approach to American history with specific topics changing each semester. May be repeated for credit. 3 Cr.

HST 602 Topics in World History (A). Provides a thematic approach to world history with specific topics changing each semester. May be repeated for credit. 3 Cr.

HST 614 Reading Seminar in Early America (A). A broad reading course in early American history that examines writings from the colonial beginnings through Reconstruction. Acquaints students with the principal literature and major recent interpretations of the field. Requires students to read, interpret and synthesize a variety of readings in social, political, economic and intellectual history. 3 Cr.

HST 615 Reading Seminar in Modern America (A). Examines writings on American history since Reconstruction. Students learn to analyze historical scholarship through readings and seminar discussions. Requires a concluding essay to help students develop a synthetic overview. 3 Cr. 3 Cr.

HST 642 Regional Seminar: Early Modern Europe (A). Examines the writings concerned with European history before 1789. Investigates historiography of the Renaissance, Reformation, Absolutist States, Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. Focuses especially on popular culture, state making, gender and the interaction of Europe with the world economy. 3 Cr.

HST 643 Regional Seminar: Modern Europe (A). Introduces students to the study of modern Europe within the framework of world history, focusing on trans-regional connections or encounters and on large-scale comparative analysis. 3 Cr.

HST 644 Regional Seminar: Latin America (A). Examines key themes in Latin American history with a focus on the post-1800 period. May include topics such as economic dependency, race and gender relations, state-building and popular movements. Places the region in a comparative and transatlantic context. 3 Cr.

HST 645 Seminar: East Asia (A). Examines the history of the Sinocentric world, Southeast Asia and Central Asia (Tibet, Xinjiang and contiguous Turkic-Muslim areas). Entails two segments: a) selected readings on a discrete, specific historical issue or development, and b) a critique and overview of significant English language works in Asian history. 3 Cr.

HST 646 Regional Seminar: Africa (A). Examines a series of themes or topics that cast Africa's historical experience in a larger world historical and comparative framework. Includes topics such as state-building, Islam in Africa, slavery and slave trades, the colonial experience, race relations and nationalism. 3 Cr.

HST 648 Regional Seminar: Medieval Europe (A). Examines key themes of medieval European history in seminar format. 3 Cr.

HST 649 The Middle East and North Africa (A). Examines major themes in the study of the Islamic Middle East and North Africa, such as the foundations of Islamic religious, political and cultural discourses; the early-modern empires; the role of colonialism and modernity in shaping the contemporary Middle East, and the trajectory of Islamic revivalism. 3 Cr.

HST 691 Research in American History (A). An individualized research experience. Allows students to develop skills in original scholarly research in American history and to explore the methods and resources appropriate for a selected area of investigation. Themes vary with the student and instructor. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

HST 695 Research in World History (A). An individualized research experience. Allows students to develop skills in original scholarly research in World history and to explore the methods and resources appropriate for a selected area of investigation. Themes vary with the student and instructor. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

HST 699 Independent Study in History (A). Arranged in consultation with the instructor-sponsor prior to registration. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

HST 700 Historical Integration (A). Entails an individualized project supervised by two faculty, culminating in an integrative essay answering a broad historiographical question based on previous readings plus an extra list of readings agreed on by the committee. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

HST 701 Masters Thesis (A). A six-credit thesis. Original and focused primary research project that must be spread out over at least two semesters and supervised by two faculty. Students must have a 3.8 GPA or the written permission of two faculty to register. Students who earn an A or A- will have their theses bound in the library. 1-6 Cr. Every Semester.

HST 702 Public History Capstone (A). Students produce a public history project in consultation with two advisors. Projects can include: an exhibit and catalogue of historical objects (virtual, digital or material); a website based on a non-material topic in public history; an essay aimed at public history scholars; a project based in an internship experience; an oral history project. All projects must have a formal written component; minimum fifteen pages with an attached project; thirty pages as stand-alone essay. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

HST 710 College Teaching Practicum (B). Provides the mature graduate student in his or her second or third semester with extensive reading in the literature on current teaching practices, audio-visual material utilization, curriculum design, and experience in all aspects of collegiatelevel teaching at the introductory level: lecturing; small-group discussion; and the preparation, administration and evaluation of written assignments and exams. Culminates with a report containing a pedagogical essay by the student, a description of the teaching experience, and the instructor's evaluation of both the pedagogical essay and the teaching experience. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

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