Graduate Social Work Courses

Main Page Content

SWK 501 Social Work Practice I (B). Prepares students for generalist social work practice with individuals, families, groups, communities and organizations. Introduces students to the history of social work practice, the place and purpose of generalist practice, and the beginning phases of practice relationships. Considers assessment and developing relationships from a cross-cultural, strength-based, community collaborative perspective across the five client systems. Develops a practice perspective focusing on empowering client systems to address issues of economic and social justice. 3 Cr.

SWK 502 Social Work Practice II (B). Prepares students for generalist social work practice with individuals, families, groups, communities and organizations. Emphasizes practice with communities and organizations. Introduces students to the work and termination phases of practice. Interventions are considered from a cross-cultural, strength-based, community collaborative perspective across the five client systems. Emphasizes interventions that focus on empowerment of client systems to address issues of economic and social justice. Considers roles such as conferee, enabler, broker, advocate, mediator and guardian. 3 Cr.

SWK 503 Advanced Standing Seminar (B). Provides the advanced standing student an opportunity to review the theoretical foundations and application of social work practice skills. Emphasizes the processes involved in individual, family, group, organizational and community interventions from a collaborative perspective. Acquaints students with the theoretical underpinnings of an integrated community collaborative practice approach. 3 Cr.

SWK 504 Field Practicum I and Seminar I (B). Provides the foundation-year, first-semester, agency-based field and seminar internship experience. Provides the required 448 hours of field practice in the first year through completion of two days of field instruction per week over 14 weeks. Uses educational learning objectives developed by the student, field instructor and faculty liaison to provide student learning opportunities in interaction with individuals, groups, organizations and larger community systems. Integrates course work and field instruction experiences in the foundation year. Uses assignments and student generated discussions to enhance knowledge and skill development based on practice situations. Seminar faculty serve as the first- and second-semester field liaison for students in the practicum. 3 Cr.

SWK 505 Field Practicum II and Field Seminar II (B). Provides the foundation year, second semester, agency-based field and seminar internship experience. Provides the required 448 hours of field practice in the first year through completion of two days of field instruction per week over 14 weeks. Uses educational learning objectives developed by the student, field instructor and faculty liaison to provide student learning opportunities in interactions with individuals, groups, organizations and larger community systems. Integrates course work and field instruction experiences in the foundation year. Uses assignments and student-generated discussions to enhance knowledge and skill development based on practice situations. Building on the previous semester's field practicum, requires acquisition of progressively more advanced skills. 3 Cr.

SWK 506 Human Behavior and Social Environment I (B). Examines major social science theories that inform the social work profession's understanding of human behavior in social systems primarily focused on groups, families and individuals. Uses an ecological/systems framework, together with a developmental approach and a diversity perspective, to provide an interactional understanding of human behavior. Emphasizes relationships among biological, social, psychological and cultural systems. 3 Cr.

SWK 507 Human Behavior and Social Environment II (B). Examines major social science theories that inform the social work profession's understanding of human behavior in social systems, primarily focused on communities and organizations. Uses an ecological/systems framework together with a developmental approach and a diversity perspective to provide an interactional understanding of human behavior. Explores principles of community development and organizational analysis. Examines linkages between the five social systems with the principles of community collaboration. 3 Cr.

SWK 508 The Diagnostic Process (B). Examines mental health challenges from an integrative and ecological perspective. Designed to give foundation level graduate work students an understanding of the etiology, clinical presentation and diagnostic understanding of the major mental health challenges for children, adolescents, adults, and older adults. Includes content on both the use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV-5 and strengths- based understanding and assessment of mental health challenges. The interactions of biological, social, cultural, spiritual, political and environmental factors are stresses in order to accurately understand the presenting challenges. Evidence- based understanding is presented both for assessment and related intervention strategies. 3 cr. 3 Cr. Spring.

SWK 515 Introduction to Substance Abuse and Addiction (B). Provides an overview of popular substances of abuse and addiction, including their effects, signs and symptoms. Analyzes historic and current theories of use, abuse, addiction, treatment and recovery. Analyzes relevant social policy issues and introduces topic of addiction and special populations, exploring the intersections between human diversity and substance abuse. 3 Cr.

SWK 520 Social Welfare Policy and Services (B). Social Welfare Policy and Services is the foundation course in the required two- course social policy curriculum content area. This course has as its primary purpose the study of the historical aspects and current nature of the major programs of social welfare, helping students develop skill in analyzing social welfare policies and programs, and exploring strategies for influencing policy at various levels. This course introduces students to the philosophical and historical perspectives of social welfare services and social work practice, and attempts to foster the development of not only descriptive, but also analytical and critical understanding of social welfare programs, policies, and services. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

SWK 524 Social Work Practice and Cultural Diversity (B). Provides preparation for the student to engage in sensitive, culturally competent, cross-cultural and cross-ethnic social work practice. Focuses on processes of oppression in society, and the experiences, needs and responses of people who have been subjected to institutionalized forms of oppression because of their particular collective characteristics. Emphasizes social work theory, knowledge and practice skills in order to guide culturally competent interventions aimed at addressing the needs of diverse groups. Stresses cognitive and affective processes throughout the course. 3 Cr.

SWK 533 Critical Thinking Research & Social Work (B). Focuses on teaching essential skills in critically reflective thinking characterized by skillful conceptualization, analysis, synthesis, evaluation and application of information (Scriven, 1996). Critical thinking skills are practiced through exposure to and analysis of academic research literature and problem-solving strategies. The utilization of logic and reasoning toward the evaluation of various social work topics and problems while assessing potential solutions is emphasized. To this end, students will apply critical thinking to various social work cases representing all levels of social work practice. 3 Cr.

SWK 540 Social Work and Family Law (B). Examines the impact of family law on social work and the daily activities of the social worker. Provides the social worker with a basic knowledge of concepts in jurisprudence and specific understanding of family court and its enabling legislation The Family Court Act. Includes lectures by experts in the fields of juvenile delinquency, persons in need of supervision, custody, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, adoption and criminal justice. Emphasizes the role of the social worker in court, including responding to subpoenas, confidentiality and testifying effectively. Stresses the practical and realist philosophy of law. 3 Cr.

SWK 560 Spirituality and Social Work (A). As a cultural universal, the importance of religion and spirituality in shaping belief systems, perceptions, culture and approaches to health and wellness has long been recognized. The clients of helping professionals hold religious and spiritual beliefs that play significant roles in their psychological development, environment, and life processes. This course examines the ways in which these beliefs influence individuals, families, small groups, communities, and program development and implementation. Psychosocial issues and perceptions of health, illness, and well-being are explored from an interdisciplinary perspective. 3 Cr.

SWK 563 Fathering and Child Outcomes (A). Just a few decades ago, fathers were termed “occasional mother substitutes” and were rarely the subject of psychological inquiry. This course recognizes the role of the father both at the societal level and within the scientific community. Course content will include the conceptions of fatherhood and manhood, methodological concerns, theoretical perspectives, policy issues and their relevance to father involvement and child outcomes. This course will also give consideration and thought to the transition to fatherhood, levels of paternal involvement across cultures, the different family configurations/structure within which fathering occurs and their effect on child development in several domains. 3 Cr.

SWK 570 Professional Ethics (B). Ethical behavior is rooted in moral philosophy. This course is intended to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate and in-depth ability to apply ethical theory, rank-ordering, and ethical reasoning to ethical dilemmas in professional practice by examining moral philosophy and critically reflecting on one’s own value system. Course content will highlight contemporary professional issues in social work practice (e.g. confidentiality, privileged communication, boundaries, conflict of interest, dual and multiple relationships) as well as examining contemporary moral issues of interest to students( e.g. death penalty). 3 Cr.

SWK 574 Self Care & the Health & Human Svc Profession (A). Self-care supports professional competence as well as the longevity and integrity of individual professionals and professions as a whole. A commitment to professional self-care and a repertoire of self-care strategies is essential to preventing and addressing consequences of helping work such as compassion fatigue, vicarious trauma, and secondary traumatic stress disorder. Effective self-care is supported by self-awareness; an understanding of coping and human resilience as well as the philosophical and theoretical foundations of self-care strategies; and application of self-care across practice settings and system levels. 3 Cr. Spring.

SWK 585 Pracitce with Sexual Minority Communities (A). Uses a gay-affirmative framework to examine practice with gender identity and sexual orientation identity. History of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer communities, including self-help and professional social service responses, will be discussed. Students will examine own biases and strengths within the context of gay-affirmative, social justice oriented practice. Intersectionality of racial and ethnic identity, social class identity and other cultural identities explored. 3 Cr.

SWK 600 Independent Study (B). Arranged in consultation with the instructor/sponsor and in accordance with procedures of appropriate academic offices prior to registration. 1-6 Cr.

SWK 601 Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families (B). Focuses on developing knowledge and advanced skills in approaches that effectively enhance, preserve, and restore individual and family functioning within a community context. Provides a knowledge base for advanced work with individuals and families and the communities within which they live who face the challenges of poverty, mental illness, minority status, family violence, sexual abuse, drug abuse, alcoholism, and major losses. Particular emphasis is given to developing advanced skills in assessment, intervention, and evaluation. The influence of ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, developmental stage, organizations, the community and the wider societal context is integrated throughout the course. 3 cr. 3 Cr. Fall.

SWK 602 Social Work Assessment and Brief Interventions (B). This course focuses on developing knowledge and skills in biopsychosocialspritual assessment in order to effectively engage individuals in direct social work practice. The course also focuses on development of assessment-based intervention plans that are person-centered and sensitive to cultural issues. Students will gain an understanding of several short-term intervention models that can be used in a wide range of direct practice settings. 3 Cr. Fall. 3 Cr. Fall.

SWK 603 Family/Community Empowerment, Advocacy and Development (B). Develops knowledge and advanced skills in approaches that effectively enhance, preserve and restore communities and their capacity to support families. Focuses on the knowledge base for work with communities within which families live, and skills to address the challenges of poverty, mental illness, minority status, family violence, sexual abuse and substance abuses. Emphasizes developing advanced skills in assessment, intervention and evaluation. Integrates the influence of ethnicity, gender sexual orientation, developmental stage, organizations, the community and the wider social context. Emphasizes empowerment and advocacy skills to help families create just and compassionate communities. 3 Cr.

SWK 604 Social Work Practice in Health Care (B). Focuses on the role and responsibilities of Social Workers in health and mental health care settings. Provides an overview of current health care settings and the unique contributions of Social Work in those settings. Also focuses on the importance of interprofessional work and strategies for ensuring that client needs are always a primary consideration in decision making. Students will explore strategies for health/wellness promotion and explore evidence-based practice resources for various health-related conditions. 3 cr. Spring. 3 Cr. Spring.

SWK 605 Cultural Humility and Social Work Practice (B). Prepares students to engage in clinical practice with a diversity of client populations, utilizing a cultural humility framework aimed at helping students develop self-awareness and understanding of sociocultural factors that create inequities. Social work theory, knowledge, and practice skills are emphasized to guide assessment, intervention, and evaluation within a cultural humility framework. Both cognitive and affective processes are stressed throughout the course. 3 cr. 3 Cr.

SWK 610 Field Practicum III and Seminar III (B). Provides advanced year first-semester, agency-based field-instruction experience and classroom seminar for advanced learning and practice opportunities relevant to the specific concentration of students. Requires completing 250 field practicum hours of field over 14 weeks fall (SWK 610) and spring (SWK 611) semesters for a total of 500 hours. Builds on the previous semesters and is progressive in knowledge and skill development. Integrates course work and field instruction experiences . Uses assignments and student-generated discussions to enhance knowledge and advanced skill development based on practice situations. Seminar faculty serve as the first- and second-semester field liaison for students in the practicum. 4 Cr.

SWK 611 Field Practicum IV and Seminar IV (B). Provides the advanced year, second-semester, agency-based field instruction experience and classroom seminar for advanced-learning and practice opportunities. Integrates course-work and field-instruction experiences. Integrates course work and field instruction. Uses assignments and student-generated discussions to enhance knowledge and advanced skill development based on practice situations. Field seminars in advanced year are taken each semester concurrent with field practicum. Students complete 250 hours of field practivum over 14 weeks in spring semester for a total of 500 hours of advanced field practicum. Seminar faculty serve as the first- and second-semester field liaison for students in the practicum. 5 Cr.

SWK 612 Field Practicum/Seminar III: Gerontological Social Work (B). Provides the year first semester agency-based field instruction and classroom seminar for advanced learning and practice opportunities relevant to gerontological social work. Students complete 280 hours of graduate level field practicum each semester during two concurrent semesters (560 hours) to develop and refine advanced level gerontological social work practice behaviors. The field seminar component of this course provides opportunities for integration of social work course work and field practicum experiences. Seminars feature in-depth analysis of specific gero-social work competency domains of practice as well as the MSW advanced competencies. 4 Cr. Fall.

SWK 613 Field Practicum/Seminar IV: Gerontological Social Work (B). Provides the year second semester agency-based field instruction and classroom seminar for advanced learning and practice opportunities relevant to gerontological social work. Students complete 250 hours of graduate level field practicum each semester during two concurrent semesters (500 hours) to develop and refine advanced level gerontological social work competencies. The field seminar component of this course provides opportunities for integration of social work course work and field practicum experiences. Seminars feature in-depth analysis of specific gero-social work competency domains of practice as well as the MSW advanced competencies. The domains of gerontological social work practice include: ethics, assessment, interventions, aging services, program and policies and service delivery and leadership in the practice area of aging using the nationally recognized Hartford Partnership in Aging Education Model. Seminar faculty members serve as the first and second semester field liaisons for students in the practicum. 5 Cr. Spring.

SWK 615 Substance Abuse Treatment (B). Provides in-depth analysis of the theory and practice of substance abuse assessment and treatment. Examines the processes of intake, assessment, intervention, treatment, case management and relapse prevention with individuals challenged by substance abuse and addiction. Analyzes the nature of evidence-based substance abuse treatment across a variety of systems, ranging from the individual to the family and community. 3 Cr. Spring.

SWK 621 Advanced Social Welfare Policy . (B). Studies federal, state and the private organization of health care services and financing. Focuses on health care studies trends, current policy shifts and challenges for the study of policy implications for current and emerging health care organizations. Examines specific policy options for current community-oriented health care delivery systems in collaborative models. 3 Cr.

SWK 631 Master’s Project Thesis (B). This course supports students in the implementation and evaluation of their Master’s Project Thesis. The course will be based on a seminar format with specific tasks and topics to be covered coming from the needs of the class. Students will read and critique the projects of class peers before they are submitted to the faculty. Students will also develop a research colloquium to present their work at the end of the semester. 3 Cr.

SWK 640 Special Topics (B). Provides an opportunity for in-depth class exploration of special topics in social work. Topics vary and change from year to year depending on the interests of students and faculty. 3 Cr.

SWK 642 Contemporary Issues (B). Provides an opportunity for students and faculty to explore contemporary issues outside of the regular course offerings. 3 Cr.

SWK 645 Sexual Health in Professional Practice (B). This course will address practice issues pertaining to the assessment, evaluation, and treatment of sexual health issues in professional practice. This course will familiarize students with the biological, psychological, cultural, and behavioral aspects of sexual health that arise in professional Social Work practice. We will focus on sexual health knowledge behavior, attitudes and values. 3 Cr.

SWK 647 Supervision and Consultation (B). Identifies and examines central concepts, theories and models of supervision and consultation. Considers strategies and techniques for establishing, improving and maintaining supervisory and consultative relationships as mechanisms for improving service to clients. Gives special attention to organization dynamics and structure, delineating the management function, and to issues of power and authority. Emphasizes the dynamics of supervision and consultation, ethical and value principles, professional boundaries, supervision and consultation as leadership functions, and the importance of collaborative processes. 3 Cr.

SWK 648 Community Collaboration and Organizational Leadership (B). Examines the concepts, principles and related theories of organizational behavior and leadership, and collaborative planning. Focuses on building a knowledge base for understanding approaches to management of organizational internal and external environments. Examines interprofessional, organizational and interdisciplinary community collaboration as an emerging direction for human services. 3 Cr.

SWK 649 Family Systems and Addiction: Theory and Practice (B). An introductory exploration of foundational concepts of family systems theory as it relates to clinical practice with systems coping with addiction issues. Topics include a bio-psycho-social perspective on addiction and related mental health issues, Murray Bowen’s theoretical framework of family systems as well as a review of foundational family counseling skills. This will be accomplished through class lecture, class discussion, film analysis, journal research, reading and writing assignments. 3 Cr.

SWK 650 International Social Work: Refugees & Immigrants (B). Introduces students to international social work practice. Students develop knowledge and skills in culturally competent approaches to effectively enhance assets and empower individuals, families, groups, agencies and communities within an international context, specifically within developing countries, and with immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers in the U.S. This course provides a beginning of knowledge base for international social work practice from a collaborative perspective to address the challenges of human rights, poverty, child abuse and neglect, physical and mental health, HIV/AIDS, environmental justice, and other social/political issues. 3 Cr. Spring.

SWK 654 Evidence Based Practice Seminar (B). Aimed at developing the knowledge and skills necessary for working with individuals with a diagnosis of serious mental illness using recovery-oriented, evidence-based practices. It is designed for MSW students and MSW mental health practitioners. Students will become familiar with evidence-based practices, within a recovery-oriented paradigm, as a general approach to practice as well as specific evidence-based interventions to use for individuals with a diagnosis of serious mental illness. It is assumed that students will have a basic knowledge of serious mental illness as a pre- or co-requisite, however a review will be provided. 3 Cr. Spring.

SWK 655 Mental Health Recovery (A). This course explores the concept of Mental Health Recovery and prepares students to provide Recovery-Oriented Social Work to adult individuals, families and groups. Students will gain an understanding of Mental Health Recovery as a personal process for an individual diagnosed with “mental illness” and will be introduced to various intervention, practices and policies that support Mental Health Recovery. The course will explore the ways in which a Strengths and Empowerment approach support Recovery along with other topics including Self-Determination, Wellness Self Management, Person-Centered Planning, Shared Decision Making and Peer Support. 3 Cr.

SWK 670 Sex, Drugs & Cigarettes: Addictions in Social Work (A). Provides a survey of various chemical and behavioral addictions, including, but not limited to, alcohol, illicit drugs, eating disorders, and sexual addictions. Students will learn about the addictive cycle and its impact on persons across the lifespan. Study will participate in the evaluation of various casual and treatment models, focusing upon paradigms for recovery. 3 Cr.

SWK 675 Motivational Interviewing (B). Examines the theoretical basis of Motivational Interviewing, including critical concepts and principles. Identifies and applies key motivational interviewing strategies designed to facilitate effective conversations about behavior change. Includes lecture and discussion; emphasizes experiential learning in the classroom (role playing and other knowledge and skill development activities) in exploration of how the change process works using motivational interviewing. 3 Cr.

SWK 680 Clinical Interventions: Advanced SWK Practice with Groups (A). Advances theoretical knowledge and clinical practice skills in clinical settings: builds on the foundation knowledge and skills for creating, facilitating and maintaining groups in social work practice. Provides preparation for use of clinical group work methods with client populations across the life cycle. Complements and builds upon group leadership skills obtained in previous practice level courses. 3 Cr. Fall.

SWK 698 Integrative Approaches to Global Social Work -Russian (A). This course is designed to introduce students to international social work practice abroad. Students develop knowledge and skills in culturally competent approaches to effectively enhance assets and empower individuals, families, groups, agencies and communities within an international context, specifically those involved with gerontological issues and to health and social services. This course provides a knowledge base for international social work practice from a collaborative perspective with emphasis on reciprocity and formal caregiving, service delivery models and Interprofessional approaches in identifying and managing functional health challenges. 1-6 Cr. Summer.

Close mobile navigation