Philosophy Major: The College at Brockport

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Description

The study of philosophy is excellent preparation not only for a career as an academic philosopher, but also for careers in all fields that require clear, analytical thinking, writing, and speaking, including teaching and education, government, the ministry, business and management, publishing, and many other fields. Philosophy is also an excellent major for pre-law students.

What can I do with a philosophy major?

Admission to the Program

Anyone can declare this major.

Program Requirements

Students in the philosophy major pursue either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, and must complete the corresponding degree's requirements.

Required Courses

  • PHL 101 Introduction to Philosophy
  • PHL 102 Introduction to Ethics
  • PHL 205 Modern Logic
  • PHL 304 Ancient Philosophy
  • PHL 305 Modern Philosophy

Total Number of Credits: 30

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, students will be able to:

  1. Present a philosophical problem, by (1) concisely and precisely stating a philosophical problem to be resolved by an argument or essay, (2) explaining why the problem is significant, (3) explaining the scope of the problem, (4) defining any terms necessary for understanding the problem.
  2. Explicate the meaning of a philosophical theory by (1) correctly deducing the logical implications of that theory, (2) describing those implications in terms of specific examples, (3) recognizing when another statement or theory contradicts the relevant theory explicitly, (4) recognizing when another statement or theory contradicts the relevant theory implicitly.
  3. Demonstrate understanding of evidence by (1) correctly stating what counts as relevant evidence for a philosophical position, (2) correctly stating what counts as relevant evidence against the argument for a philosophical position and recognizing that evidence as such, (3) explaining why any cited evidence is relevant or irrelevant to a philosophical position, (4) distinguishing evidentiary claims about a philosophical position from rhetorically persuasive but specious claims about a philosophical position.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of logic, by (1) recognizing arguments, (2) constructing good arguments, (3) evaluating arguments, (4) avoiding fallacies (e.g. begging the question).
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of dialectical method in philosophy, by (1) formulating possible objections to the thesis of an essay, (2) formulating possible objections to the argument for the essay's thesis, (3) responding to possible objections to the essay's thesis by showing that they are mistaken, (4) responding to possible objections to the argument for the essay's thesis by showing that they are mistaken.
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