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What is Computing Sciences/Computer Science/Computing Information Systems?

Computer science is the study of the theory and practice of computation. A computer scientist creates new hardware and software that is more efficient, effective, and reliable.

Computer information systems is the study of the use of computers for systematic organization of data that supports efficient and accurate collection, processing, analysis and retrieval of information. An information system specialist applies existing technology to solve real world problems.

Both incorporate aspects of several other fields: mathematics, to analyze the properties of algorithms and data structures; engineering, to design and construct practical programs and machines; the experimental sciences, both to investigate the behavior of programs running on real machines and to use programs for modeling scientific phenomena; the cognitive sciences, to develop "intelligent" programs and to study computation in relation to human intelligence; and business administration, to identify information needs of organizations.

Computer science and computer information systems are young and rapidly developing fields. Presently, their chief areas, reflected in regular course offerings at the College, are: algorithms, data structures, programming languages, software engineering, object-oriented design and development, systems analysis, software project management, computer organization, architecture, operating systems, artificial intelligence, decision support and expert systems, computer networks, computer and network security, database systems, data mining, web publishing, multimedia, electronic commerce, etc. Other areas are covered in independent study and topics courses. In addition, students can gain valuable job experience through internship programs and Brockport Career Exploration courses (BCEC).

The programs offered by the department provide students with an excellent basis for a variety of careers and for graduate study. Possible careers include programming, system analysis and design, maintenance, management and user support of software in areas such as business, science, engineering, and computer systems. Fields of graduate study include computer science, mathematics, information systems, information management, and various areas of science and engineering.

Computing Science Programs at Brockport

The Department of Computing Sciences at Brockport was established as a separate department in 1989.  In addition to teaching a wide variety of courses the faculty members are actively engaged in scholarship.

A plethora of students are enrolled as majors, encompassing a wide spectrum of people - from traditional college-age undergraduates seeking their primary degree to older students returning to upgrade their knowledge in a discipline essential to compete in today's high-tech society.

The College at Brockport offers a wide variety of courses in many areas of Computer Science and Information Systems:

  • programming methodology
  • design and analysis of algorithms
  • software engineering
  • programming languages
  • database systems
  • computer architecture
  • modeling and simulation
  • artificial intelligence
  • computer networking
  • computer security, etc.

Our department currently offers both a major and minor in Computing sciences as well as a major and minor in Computer Information Systems. A degree in computing sciences provides students with an excellent basis for a variety of careers and for graduate study. Possible careers include programming, system analysis and design, maintenance, management and user support of software in areas such as business, science, engineering, and computer systems. Fields of graduate study include computer science, mathematics, information systems, information management, and various areas of science and engineering.

Student Advisement

Students should strive to choose a coherent set of courses aimed at achieving their educational goals. An individual student's program should, however, be discussed with his or her computer science faculty advisor. It is suggested that students consider a minor or second major in another discipline to complement their computer science major.

Last Updated 11/20/18

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