Fall 2016 Advising Guide

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See your advisor that week to sign up early for fall 2016 English classes.

Professors Karl, Proehl, and Tait are away from Brockport on research leave. If any one of them is your advisor, you have been assigned a temporary advisor for this year. Check the bulletin board in the English department office or email mobourn@brockport.edu.

Literature Concentration Advising Guide

Creative Writing Concentration Advising Guide

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Graduate Course Descriptions

Literature Track Advising Guide, Fall 2016

Literary Analysis

Subject

Course Title Days Time Instructor

ENG

303.01

Intro. To Literary Analysis

TR

2.00-3.15

Slater, Michael

ENG

303.02

Intro. To Literary Analysis

MWF

12:20-1:10

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

303.03

Intro. To Literary Analysis

W

6:30-9:15

Karl, Alissa

ENG

303.04

Intro. To. Literary Analysis

MWF

1:25-2:15

Haytock, Jennifer

Shakespeare

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

323.01

Shakespeare's Histories
& Tragedies

TR

11:00-12:15

Slater, Michael

British Lit before 1800

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

229.01

Shakespeare & Film

TR

9:30-10:45

Slater, Michael

ENG

323.01

Shakespeare's Histories &
Tragedies

TR

11:00-12:15

Slater, Michael

ENG

375.01

British Novel I

TR

2:00-3:15

Kerfoot, Alicia

British Lit after 1800

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

308.01

Decadence/Decay

MWF

10:10-11:00

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

378.01

20-21st Century Brit Lit

TR

11:00-12:15

Karl, Alicia

American Lit before 1900

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG 380.01 Early American Gothic MWF 1:25-2:15 Hinds, Janie

ENG

451.01

Romantic Era

MWF

12:20-1:10

Garvey, Greg

American Lit after 1900

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

235.02

Intro Afro-Amer Lit

TR

3:30-4:45

Tait, Althea

ENG

241.01

American Lit II

TR

9:30-10:45

Young, Phil

ENG

386.01

Af-Amer Women Lit

TR

9:30-10:45

Tait, Althea

World Literature

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

221.01

Who Wrote Bible

MWF

1:25-2:15

Busch, Austin

ENG

223.01

HON- Modern World
Lit

TR

9:30-10:45

Allen, Sharon

ENG

225.01

Empire Writes Back

MWF

9:05-9:55

Kurtz, J Roger

ENG

316.01

African Novel

MWF

10:10-11:00

Kurtz, J Roger

ENG

320.01

Lit of Viking Age

MWF

2:30-3:20

Jurasinski, Stefan

ENG

367.01

Women World Lit

TR

12:30-1:45

Alle, Sharon

Capstone

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

472.01

Curious Case of the
Adapted Detective

MWF

2:30-3:20

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

472.02

Objects, Others, and
Things in 18th Century
British Literature

TR

3:30-4:45

Kerfoot, Alicia

Upper-division electives may be chosen from above (300+) or from the following:

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

300.01

Advanced Composition

TR

2:00-3:15

Karl, Alissa

FLM

301.01

Film Theory and Criticism

TR

3:30-4:45

Soles, Carter

FLM

303.01

Ecocinema

TR

2:00-3:15

Soles, Carter

ENG

304.01

Fiction Workshop

TR

12:30-1:45

Panning, Anne

ENG

304.02

Fiction Workshop

MW

3:35-4:50

Whorton, James

ENG

305.02

Poetry Workshop

TR

2:00-3:15

Fellner, Steve

ENG

305.61

Poetry Workshop (hybrid)

TBA

 

Fellner, Steve

ENG

308.01

Decadence/Decay

MWF

10:10-11

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

378.01

20-21st Cent Brit Lit

TR

11-12:15

Karl, Alissa

ENG

396.01

Children's Lit

TR

11:00-12:15

Proehl, Kristen

ENG

396.61

Children's Lit

TBA

 

Norcia, Megan

ENG

397.01

Young Adult Lit

TR

9.30-10.45

Proehl, Kristen

ENG

397.02

Young Adult Lit

M

6:30-9:15

Norcia, Megan

ENG

473.01

Linguistic & Second
Language Acquisition

TR

2:00-3:15

Barski-Moskal, Ewelina

ENG

491.01

Advanced Fiction Workshop

TR

2:00-3:15

Panning, Anne

ENG

493.01

Advanced Lit Nonfiction
Workshop

R

6:30-9:15

Fellner, Steve

ENG

495.01

Writer's Craft

W

6:30-9:15

Whorton, James


Creative Writing Track Advising Guide, Fall 2016

Literary Analysis

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

303.01

Intro. To Literary Analysis

TR

2.00-3.15

Slater, Michael

ENG

303.02

Intro. To Literary Analysis

MWF

12:20-1:10

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

303.03

Intro. To Literary Analysis

W

6:30-9:15

Karl, Alissa

ENG

303.04

Intro. To. Literary Analysis

MWF

1:25-2:15

Haytock, Jennifer

Introduction to Creative Writing

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

210.01

Intro to Creative Writing

TR

9:30-10:45

Metzger, Thomas

ENG

210.02

Intro to Creative Writing

MWF

1:25-2:15

Iuppa, Mary Jo

ENG

210.03

Intro to Creative Writing

TR

12.30-1.45

Metzger, Thom

ENG

210.04

Intro to Creative Writing

MWF

2:30-3:20

Iuppa, MJ

ENG

210.05

Intro to Creative Writing

MWF

11:15-12:05

Cedeno, Sarah

ENG 210.06 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 10:10-11:00 Cedeno, Sarah

British Literature

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

229.01

Shakespeare & Film

TR

9:30-10:45

Slater, Michael

ENG

323.01

Shakespeare's Histories &
Tragedies

TR

11:00-12:15

Slater, Michael

ENG

308.01

Decadence/Decay

MWF

10:10-11:00

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

375.01

British Novel I

TR

2:00-3:15

Kerfoot, Alicia

ENG

378.01

20-21st Century Brit Lit

TR

11:00-12:15

Karl, Alicia

American Literature

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

235.02

Intro Afro-Amer Lit

TR

3:30-4:45

Tait, Althea

ENG

241.01

American Lit II

TR

9:30-10:45

Young, Phil

ENG

380.01

Early Amer Gothic

MWF

1:25-2:15

Hinds, Janie

ENG

386.01

Af-Amer Women Lit

TR

9:30-10:45

Tait, Althea

ENG

451.01

Romantic Era

MWF

12:20-1:10

Garvey, Greg

World Literature

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

221.01

Who Wrote Bible

MWF

1:25-2:15

Busch, Austin

ENG

223.01

HON- Modern World
Lit

TR

9:30-10:45

Allen, Sharon

ENG

225.01

Empire Writes Back

MWF

9:05-9:55

Kurtz, J Roger

ENG

316.01

African Novel

MWF

10:10-11:00

Kurtz, J Roger

ENG

320.01

Lit of Viking Age

MWF

2:30-3:20

Jurasinski, Stefan

ENG

367.01

Women World Lit

TR

12.30-1.45

Allen, Sharon

Fiction or Nonfiction Workshop

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

304.01

Fiction Workshop

TR

12:30-1:45

Panning, Anne

ENG

304.02

Fiction Workshop

MW

3:35-4:50

Whorton, James

Poetry Workshop

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

305.02

Poetry Workshop

TR

2:00-3:15

Fellner, Steve

ENG

305.61

Poetry Workshop (hybrid)

TBA

 

Fellner, Steve

Advanced Workshop

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

491.01

Advanced Fiction Workshop

TR

2:00-3:15

Panning, Anne

ENG

493.01

Advanced Lit Nonfiction
Workshop

R

6:30-9:15

Fellner, Steve

Writer's Craft

ENG

495.01

Writer's Craft

W

6.30-9.15

Whorton, James

Upper-division electives may be chosen from above or from the following:

Subject

Course

Title

Days

Time

Instructor

ENG

300.01

Advanced Composition

TR

2:00-3:15

Karl, Alissa

FLM

301.01

Film Theory and Criticism

TR

11.00-12.15

Soles, Carter

FLM

303.01

Ecocinema

TR

2:00-3:15

Soles, Carter

ENG

396.01

Children's Lit

TR

11:00-12:15

Proehl, Kristen

ENG

396.61

Children's Lit

TBA

 

Norcia, Megan

ENG

397.01

Young Adult Lit

TR

9.30-10.45

Proehl, Kristen

ENG

397.02

Young Adult Lit

M

6:30-9:15

Norcia, Megan

ENG

472.01

Curious Case of the
Adapted Detective

MWF

2:30-3:20

Burstein, Miriam

ENG

472.02

Objects, Others, and
Things in 18th Century
British Literature

TR

3:30-4:45

Kerfoot, Alicia

ENG

473.01

Linguistic & Second
Language Acquisition

TR

2:00-3:15

Barski-Moskal, Ewelina

Fall 2016 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

ENG 210.01 Creative Writing
TR 9:30-10:45
Mr. Thomas Metzger

ENG 210 is an introductory level course that will give students opportunities to explore poetry, and short fiction. Besides basic writer's craft, editing and critical response will be emphasized.

ENG 210.02 Creative Writing
MWF 1:25-2:15
Ms. Mary Jo Iuppa

This gateway course is a four genre smorgasbord that's guaranteed to whet the creative writer's appetite. Students will explore the fundamental skills of poetry, fiction, nonfiction and play writing. For some, this creative writing workshop experience will be new- unlike any other they've experienced; while others may find this workshop an opportunity to push their writing skills further. The course is designed around the belief that one must read widely and closely in order to write. This is an intensive writing course, meant for students who are dedicated readers and serious about the process of writing. We will examine the works of both established and emerging writers in hopes of discerning and emulating the qualities of good poetry, fiction, nonfiction and play writing. Frequent writing exercises will provide the opportunity to practice, to imitate, and to experiment. Class members will work together to create a welcoming and productive workshop, including extensive in-class discussion of both published writers and student work. Students will write four critical shorts that explore elements of writer's craft.

At the end of the semester, each student will submit a portfolio ofselected (revised) creative works. Get ready for an all you can write semester.

ENG 210.03 Creative Writing
TR 12:30 - 1:45
Mr. Thomas Metzger

ENG 210 is an introductory level course that will give students opportunities to explore poetry, and short fiction. Besides basic writer's craft, editing and critical response will be emphasized.

ENG 201.04 Creative Writing
MWF 2:30-3:20
Ms. Mary Jo Iuppa

See course description ENG 210.02 above.

ENG 210.05 Creative Writing
MWF 11:15-12:05
Ms. Sarah Cedeno

This course will immerse you in the craft of creative writing. We'll study short samples from contemporary literary magazines and masters of the contemporary, paired with writing prompts that put you in action. You'll emulate the admirable aspects of what we read while working toward your own aesthetic.

You'll visit the Writers Forum twice in the semester to engage with writers whose work you've read and discussed.

You will write, revise and workshop a piece of your choosing. You'll engage in lively discussion about the work of your peers. You'll come away with a new super-power, but mostly, you'll be a better reader, critic, and writer.

ENG 210.06 Creative Writing
MWF 10:10-11
Ms. Sarah Cedeno

See description for 210.05

ENG 221.01 Who Wrote the Bible?
MWF 1:25-2:15
Dr. Austin Busch

Who wrote the Bible? Carefully examines select Old and New Testament writings in order to answer questions about biblical authorship. Who wrote these books? How do we know? Were any based on earlier writings? What is their literary status? Historiography? Pius fiction? Something else entirely? How do biblical writings relate to other ancient writings? How do all these questions relate to traditional views of scriptural inspiration held by Jews and Christians today? How do they relate to broader philosophical questions regarding the feasibility of communication between human beings and a divine other (God)? We will closely read a selection of biblical writings in order to discover the frequently surprising answers they offer to questions such as these.

ENG 223.01 Honors - Modern World Literature: Urban Contexts, Urbane Consciousness, & the Making of Modern Fiction & Film
TR 9:30-10:45
Dr. Sharon Allen

Avant-garde art, poetry, fiction and film are often peculiarly urbane visual and verbal constructs. That is, they critically represent urban contexts, refracting these through urbane consciousnesses. As modern writers converge in such cities as London, Paris, St. Petersburg, Prague, Lisbon, Rio de Janeiro, Luanda, Algiers... the discrete contours of these capitals filter into their fictions, not only as narrative setting where characters and cultural discourses collide. The city's contours-both literal and literary (imaginary and intertextual)-also filter into form. Avant-garde work makes us especially aware of the complex interplay of text and context through its reflexive turn, foregrounding the restructuring of art, redrawing the boundaries of genres as well as re-mapping cultural geographies, reconfiguring history, etc. Avant-garde work critically revisits commonplaces in the city and citytext, to redefine contemporary culture.

First engaging nineteenth-century works ranging from Poe's "Man of the Crowd" and Gogol's Petersburg tales to Dostoevsky's and Machado de Assis's underground narratives, we enter the twentieth century by exploring the polyphonic, haunted and hallucinatory cities of Bely's Petersburg, Pessoa's O Livro do Desassossego [The Book of Disquietude], Kafka's "Metamorphosis", and Mário de Andrade's Pauliceia Desvairada [Hallucinated City]. With such writers as our guides, this course explores dark corners of the modern city and subject, attending to urban discourses and debates concentrated within peculiarly disrupted, divided, digressive urbane consciousness. It explores in these and more recent works of fiction by Lispector, Veríssimo, Borges, Agualusa, Petrushevskaia, Ulitskaia, Sebbar, and Bouraoui, the pressures of the modern city in cultural crisis, the impact of the increasingly decentered eccentric and ex-centric city on the formation of self, and the capacity of the writer to arbitrate against a death sentence by reimagining the limits of the literary sentence.

This survey focuses on what Benjamin called "correspondences" between urban contexts, urbane consciousness, and forms of narrative prose, poetry, and cinema. In particular, it follows nineteenth- and twentieth-century figures of the gamin, flaneur, and bricoleur, the scribbler or hack writer, the copy clerk, the deviant and the detective, the displaced and divided subject erring in the margins of the city and the page. Our wandering begins and ends in Paris and London, where we follow first old men and finally adolescent girls. But we move far beyond these central site for discourse about modernist and postmodernist literature, turning through Lusophone and Slavic fictions and films that cross between European, North and South American, and African cities, spending our time wandering the streets and texts of St. Petersburg, Prague, Lisbon, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Algiers, as charted in fiction, poetry, and film of the mid- to late-nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

The central questions we consider in this course include not only how urban contexts and urbane consciousness are represented in literature, but also how the city shapes writing. What common and particular chronotopic, architectural and artistic dimensions filter into the literature of discrete cities? How do these dimensions correlate to a city's socio-economic, political, ideological history? How are different cities spaces of encounter and isolation? In what ways do discrete cities become sites of mystery, metamorphosis, memory? How is the city read as text? How does it figure in the construction of individual and cultural identity? How is childhood shaped by urban life? How does the child's perspective deform or reform the city? How is the city understood in terms of deception, dissembling, delusion, dream and delirium, doubling and division, digression, deviance, disease, death, dissent and creativity? Are there distinct kinds of cities (concentric and eccentric cities, for instance, as suggested by Lotman and the Tartu school of cultural semiotics; differently post-colonial cities; etc.) that might allow us to delineate distinct literary dynamics? Are there different aesthetic implications for the native vs. the newcomer to the city? How do the transnational, transcultural, translingual experiences of the exile, emigré, and immigrant revise the citytext? What is the relation between gender and cultural geography?

Our discussions of texts, films, and images will revolve around our writing about them, working from the principle that our writing concentrates our critical thinking in a form that can be cultivated for more incisive interpretations of literary texts, cultural contexts, and critical perspectives. The course envisions reading and writing as interrelated processes, open-ended and recursive. Hence the readings and essays build on each other. The later reading and writing assignments draw on our earlier study of literary texts and critical contexts-complicating and questioning earlier conceptions of the urban/e text, developing skills in close reading and expanding comparative contexts for literary analysis.

ENG 223.02 Modern World Literature
MWF 11:15- 12:05
Ms. Herma Volpe-van Dijk


ENG 225.01 Empire Writes Back
MWF 9:05 - 9:55
Dr. J. Roger Kurtz

In this course we study the connection between British literature and the British Empire. We will ask how literature influences and is influenced by historical events such as imperialism. With our focus on Africa, we will read some works about Africa by British writers, with an eye to how they portrayed Britain's relationship with that continent during the time of high imperialism.But we don't want to stop there. After examining British portrayals of Africa and Africans, we will go on to look at how African writers responded to those portrayals. How does African literature relate to imperialism? How does the Empire "write back," to use Salman Rushdie's phrase?

ENG 229.01: Shakespeare and Film
TR 9:30-10:45
Dr. Michael Slater

"It has become a popular commonplace that had Shakespeare been born in the twentieth century, he would have been a filmmaker." So writes Douglas Lanier in an entertaining and enormously interesting essay, "William Shakespeare, filmmaker." But what exactly does it mean to suggest that Shakespeare, writing roughly three centuries before the development of motion pictures, is an especially "cinematic" writer? While his works were certainly written for performance, can we so easily elide the historical differences between sixteenth century play script and twentieth century screenplay? How do directors translate from stage to screen, and what-if anything-is lost in such a translation? What makes for a good Shakespeare film-authenticity, fidelity to the text, creativity and/or innovation? More broadly, how do we understand the role of adaptation, and how do we distinguish between adaptation and appropriation? Over the course of the semester, we will engage with these and other questions as we explore several of Shakespeare's greatest comedies and tragedies, as well as various film productions pertaining to them. Films and texts may include Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, Macbeth, The Tempest, and King Lear.

ENG 235.02 Intro to African-American Literature
TR 3:30-4:45
Dr. Althea Tait

This course is designed to explore African American's contribution to the American literary canon. In the process of this exploration, we will consider five primary concepts 1) the 19th and 20th century discussions of citizenship, freedom, and even the concept of what constitutes a human being, 2) the rationale as to why a separate genre of literature exists within the overarching American literary tradition, 3) the way in which intersectionality-or a collision of intersecting forces of race, class, gender, religion, orientation, etc.-influence the visibility of certain American authors and the availability of their works, 4) how African American writers have employed American literary traditions and aesthetics while inventing a tradition and aesthetic uniquely their own, 5) and how African American writers depict a Black representation of life, or as Mari Evans has eloquently argued, how they express "the human condition through a Black lens."

In this survey course, students will read works from multiple genres such as the 18th and 19th century confessional slave narrative, poetry, even hip hop poetics; additionally, students will screen documentaries and engage in close listening sessions related to the material. Because of the sensitive nature of some of the material, students are encouraged to engage in chemistry building to form a community beginning with the very first class session; successful attendance is critical for this course.

Through careful readings and a concentration on the process of becoming better scholars, students will engage also in the process of research and writing analyses related to core themes at work in the material.

ENG 241.01 American Literature II
TR 9:30-10:45
Dr. Phil Young

The course will mainly involve discussions of fiction and poetry, with some added emphasis on essays and drama. The course focuses particular attention on the increasing influence of modernism (and post-modernism), the continued impact of realism, regionalism, and naturalism, as well as the importance and influence of social justice and key cultural moments like the rise of modern feminism and the Harlem Renaissance/Civil Rights Movement.

ENG 300.01 Advanced Composition

(fulfills Adolescence Education certification requirement)

TR 12:30-1:45
Dr. Robert Baker

Advanced Composition helps college writers develop skills that will be of use in upper-division courses, graduate school, and professional life. The course is broken roughly into two (related) halves: in the first part of the semester, we will study and experiment with genre and rhetorical situation in order to become adept at decoding what kinds of writing are called for and when, and to understand what different kinds of written address imply and demand of us; in the second half, we will take a close look at different ways that effective arguments can be made, deploying both personal experience and careful research to craft successful arguments. This is a writing-intensive course in which you will undertake substantial independent work to become a self-directed writer who is capable of making effective choices in all kinds of writing situations.

ENG 302.01 Business Writing
MWF 8-8:50
Ms. Mary Anne Donovan


ENG 302.02 Business Writing
TR 11-12:15
Ms. Jennifer Litt


ENG 302.03 Business Writing
TR 8-9:15
Dr. Nathan Pritts

During this course you will learn how to prepare written communications for common business applications, including good news letters, bad news letters, informational memoranda, short email, complex reports, blogs, job applications and resumes. As a result of preparing these documents, you will improve your word processing and general computer skills. In addition, the course emphasizes demonstration of editing skills, revision, and use of standard English fundamentals and grammar.

ENG 302.04 Business Writing: The Business of Play
MW 3:35-4:50
Dr. Megan Norcia

In this interactive class, students will create their own toy company and gain experience preparing communications to support its operations. Students will practice writing, revising, and editing letters, memos, reports, job application materials, résumés, proposals, and other documents; in the process, they will gain a working knowledge of standard usage, grammar, and mechanics.

ENG 302.06 Business Writing
MWF 9-9:55
Dr. Elizabeth Whittingham

Since today's workplace functions in a global community, this course puts an emphasis on valuing diversity and communicating in an environment that includes people from a variety of backgrounds. Our focus will be on using positive and bias-free language while developing our critical thinking skills as we plan and write emails, letters, and one long report. Feedback will focus on improving writing and problem solving abilities.

ENG 302.07 Business Writing
MWF 11:15-12:05
Dr. Elizabeth Whittingham

See the description for 302.06

ENG 302.61 Business Writing
SLN
Ms. Mary Anne Donovan


ENG 302.62 Business Writing
SLN
Dr. Phil Young


ENG 303.01: Intro to Literary Analysis
TR 12:30-1:45
Dr. Michael Slater

This course serves as an introduction to the tools of literary analysis, working especially, but not exclusively, on honing our close reading skills. While texts for the class will span a wide array of genres and modes-poetry, drama, short and long fiction, and films-our focus will remain fixed primarily on the topic of "magic and monsters." To judge only from popular media, ours is a culture obsessed with the supernatural and the unnatural, with magic and monsters and creatures endowed with extraordinary abilities and powers (think Harry Potter, Twilight, or Game of Thrones). Many of our most popular narratives evoke aberrations that, by all appearances, we find at once threatening and thrilling. But this cultural obsession with magic and monsters is nothing new, both featuring prominently in fiction since as early as Homer. In readings from Shakespeare to Mary Shelley to Bram Stoker and beyond, we will explore what makes a monster monstrous and why magic is so enthralling. Along the way, we will consider the magical and the monstrous as tropes for, among other things, ambition, knowledge, sexuality, narrative form, and the aesthetic power of illusion.

ENG 303.02 Intro to Literary Analysis
MWF 12:20-1:10
Dr. Miriam Burstein

This course offers students a "toolkit" for close reading. We will work with multiple genres-poetry, fiction, drama, film-and practice the skills necessary for analyzing and appreciating each. Among other things, students will practice basic poetic scansion, learn what constitutes different genres, and develop a working knowledge of critical vocabulary. This is a hands-on course, not a lecture: students should come prepared for in-class discussion and regular exercises. Readings include extensive poetry selections; Shakespeare's Hamlet; Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead; and Scott G. F. Bailey's The Astrologer. Three essays; exams; quizzes; oral presentation.

ENG 303.03 Intro to Literary Analysis
TR 12:30-1:45
Dr. Alissa Karl

For English majors and prospective majors. Provides skills needed to understand literature in English. Includes close reading of selected texts and study of literary genres, critical terms, and the relationship between text and context. Provides practice in writing literary analyses. Emphasizes skills of generating, rewriting, and editing the documented critical essay and other nonfiction prose suitable to the needs and future careers of English majors. Majors and minors must earn a "C" or better.

ENF 303.04 Intro to Literary Analysis
MWF 1:25-2:15
Dr. Jennifer Haytock

ENG 303 is the foundation course required of undergraduate English majors and minors, designed to teach you how to read, write, and think as a serious student of literature. We will study the conventions of various literary genres, particularly poetry, drama, and fiction. In the process of discussing different types of literature, we will practice many of the skills you need to be successful, including close reading, critical thinking, and formal writing, and we will build your familiarity with literary terminology and critical theory.

ENG 304.01 Fiction Workshop
TR 12:30-1:45
Anne Panning

In this course, students will write a full-length short story, a flash fiction, and an essay, "The Life of a Fiction Writer." We will workshop pieces in class for critique and feedback. There will be weekly readings of short stories and craft essays, and many in-class exercises throughout the semester.

NG 304.02, Fiction Workshop
MW 3:35-4:50
Dr. Jim Whorton

This is an intermediate course in writing short stories. We will study work by a variety of writers--Anton Chekhov, Edward P. Jones, Mary Robison, David Leavitt, Flannery O'Connor, and Alice Munro, among others. Each student will write two short stories to be discussed in the workshop. Written critiques will be due at every meeting, and revised stories will be due at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: ENG 210.

Required text: Strunk and White.The Elements of Style. 4th ed. Allyn & Bacon, 1999. ISBN 0-205-31342-6

ENG 305.02 Poetry Workshop
TR 2-3:15
Dr. Stephen Fellner

Often creative writing classes become bogged down in perfunctory affirmation and rote criticisms. A key component in this class will be developing a heightened awareness of the ways in which texts are evaluated, discussed. Through intensive self-reflection and conversation, we will challenge and find alternatives to the myth of the creative writer as someone whose sole goal is "to fully express himself" in seclusion, battling inner demons and the worthless society that fails to understand his Art. Even though the class will ultimately settle into a workshop format., readings will be intensive, emphasizing texts that present the readers with distinct formal challenges. Students will be required to turn in two portfolios that best exploits their talents, needs.

Because the best ways to improve as a writer are to read, to write, and to revise, this course will focus heavily on all three of these activities. It is my strong belief that reading and writing with passionate regularity (and irregular passion) are the best ways to grow as a writer, so the reading for this course will be extensive.

The writing workshop requires much from each writer in order to be successful. Participation is crucial to success (both academic and artistic) in the course. We will discuss the ins and outs of workshop at length, but at this point, I want you all to feel welcome and free in this course to express yourselves, and to remind you that in order to create the comfortable atmosphere conducive to a superlative workshop experience, we must all follow a high set of standards, both of preparedness and of courtesy.

ENG 305.61 Poetry Workshop
SLN
Dr. Stephen Fellner

See description for ENG 305.02 above.

ENG 308.01 Decadence and Decay
MWF 10:10-11
Dr. Miriam Burstein

In 1893, Arthur Symons argued that the literature of the 1890s was "no doubt a decadence; it has all the qualities that mark the end of great periods […]: an intense self-consciousness, a restless curiosity in research, an over-subtilizing refinement upon refinement, a spiritual and moral perversity." As this quotation suggests, late-Victorian authors turned a skeptical eye on their own cultural inheritance. For many, "decadence"-the elusive moment between perfect ripeness and rot-became the watchword for both their own aesthetic aspirations and the state of 1890s Britain. Authors celebrated the power of literary artifice, explored new ways of representing subjectivity, and experimented with alternative forms of gender and sexual expression. Despite the era's association with the mantra of "art for art's sake," these authors (and their frequently negative critics!) grasped that their avant-garde aesthetics also had social ramifications. This course introduces students to the major authors of the 1890s across multiple genres, attending to the contributions of both male and female writers. Readings include novels by Thomas Hardy, Olive Schreiner, Oscar Wilde, and Bram Stoker, along with poetry, short fiction, drama, and literary criticism. Two papers, midterm, final, presentation.

ENG/AAS 316.01 African Novel
MWF 10:10-11
Dr. J. Roger Kurtz

This course introduce sthe wealth of outstanding novels from the African continent. We will read nine novels from seven countries, and in the process we willexamine some of the major social, historical and aesthetic issues that African writers are addressing in their novels. How do they adapt this alien import to the African context? How do they respond to the legacy of colonialism in their writing? What do they consider the important issues for Africa today? Is there anything that makes an African novel uniquely African? Because we all hold preconceptions about Africa (which are often limited and superficial, coming from popular culture and the media), a major goal of this course is to make our understandings of Africa and Africans richer, deeper and more complex through reading some of the continent's literary masterpieces.

ENG 320.01: Literature and Culture of the Viking Age
MWF 2:30-3:20
Dr. Stefan Jurasinski

We will read (in translation) some of the major mythological texts surviving from early medieval Norway and Iceland, acquainting ourselves with Odin, Thor, Loki and others and the culture that gave rise to them. We will also read two or three of the major Icelandic sagas that narrate famous bloodfeuds of the settlement period. We will give some attention to Runic inscriptions, archaeology, and law.

ENG 323.01: Shakespeare's Histories and Tragedies
TR 11-12:15
Dr. Michael Slater

In a superb metaphor, Northrup Frye explains that "tragic heroes are so much the highest points in their human landscape that they seem the inevitable conductors of the power about them, great trees more likely to be struck by lightning than a clump of grass." If tragic heroes are great, towering figures, perhaps none stand taller than Shakespeare's. We tend to identify his greatest characters and plays with the tragedies-Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and King Lear, to name only a few. Not unlike his tragedies, Shakespeare's histories also center on supremely powerful figures, usually monarchs from England's past. Frye's characterization of the tragic hero as a central "conductor of power," in fact, appears to apply just as well to many protagonists from the histories. In this course we will examine several of Shakespeare's tragedies and histories, paying particular attention to the social and historical conditions that helped to shape them. We will investigate the cultural forces and practices that inform the plays, from the Petrarchan sonnet craze in the 1590s to attitudes toward the "divine right" of kings to customs of inheritance in early modern England. But we will also consider the plays as performances within this culture, thinking about the Elizabethan stage as well as watching several modern adaptations and productions. By the end of the course, we will have developed a better understanding of tragedy in general, and of Shakespeare's tragedies and (tragic?) histories in particular.

ENG/WMS 348.01 Sex and Gender in Literary Theory
TR 3:30-4:45
Dr. Megan Obourn

In this class we will work together toward answering the following questions: How can critical theory help us to think differently about power, identity, literature, and the ways we see the world? What are the benefits and pitfalls of having multiple theoretical frames for understanding sex, gender, and sexuality as it is represented in literature and in our lives more broadly? To what extent can understanding genealogies of critical thought about sex and gender help us to relate in more open and ethical ways to our world? ENG/WMS 348 provides tools to answer these questions including an advanced introduction to traditions of theory and criticism related to sex and gender studies, practice of close reading skills, and application of theory to texts. We will analyze primary theoretical material as well as literature in relation to theories of gender and sexuality. The course is organized according to the "school" of criticism or theory that each of our critics works within. Most gender and sexuality theories draw on multiple schools of thought; be prepared to see overlaps in critics' approaches. Though theories of sex and gender have a long, complex and international history, we will focus on selected contemporary critical approaches largely by authors from Europe and the Americas. We will touch on sex and gender criticism in relation to structuralist, post-structuralist, psychoanalytic, queer, intersex, transgender, Marxist, critical race, postcolonial, and disability theory. This is not an exhaustive list but does cover many of the main schools of contemporary critical thinking about gender and sexuality. The course includes both the theory itself and the applied theory: you will learn not just theoretical descriptions of gender criticism and theory, but how to use this theory in your critical thinking, reading and writing practices. To that end, we will read a novel, some poetry, and some applied criticism. You will also write about a community event using the theories you've learned.

ENG 367.01 Women in World Literature: Women & Memoir: Reconfiguring Cultural Memory
TR 12:30-1:45
Dr. Sharon Allen

In this seminar, we comparatively explore forms and functions of memory in 20 th-century works of non-fictional & fictional prose, poetry, painting, & film by women dealing with devastating socio-political disruption, unstable cultural discourses, and displacement/diaspora. Our reading of "memoir" extends beyond conventionally demarked generic terrain, while exploring the ways in which gender reframes genre and geo-cultural memory. Focusing first on Slavic women's writing, we extend our gaze to encompass contemporary women's (re)writings in varied visual as well as verbal genres across the globe, re-casting and re-mapping cultural memory throughout a traumatic 20th-century. We investigate how this remembering may reflect not only cosmopolitan post-modern, post-colonial consciousness, but also a peculiar interest in cultivating polyphonic poetic and political discourse, both within and beyond borders. While looking for common ground, we ask how these works (cor)respond to particular cultural and generic contexts, cross discrete literal and literary, geographical and generic boundaries, reconfigure personal as well as cultural memory, and confront the present through the past.

ENG 375.01: British Novel I: Adventurers, Quixotes, Lovers, and Readers:The Eighteenth-Century Novel
TR 2-3:15
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot

This is a course about how adventure, romance, imagination, and the figure of the reading character helped to develop the form of the novel throughout the eighteenth century. In this course we will study the development of the early British novel, from Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, and Charlotte Lennox, to Ann Radcliffe's Gothic novel A Sicilian Romance and Jane Austen's response to her in Northanger Abbey. We will focus on the impact that ideas about adventure, romance, and the quixotic character had on the early British novel (quixotic characters are those who are idealistic and incorrectly apply the novels or other materials they read to real-world circumstances). We will consider the historical context of the novels, the issues of class, gender, race, and ethnicity that they bring to the forefront, and the ways that we should or should not see the growth of the novel in the eighteenth century as a narrative often labeled "the rise of the novel."

ENG 378.01: Twentieth and Twenty-First Century British Literature: Money
TR 11-12:15
Dr. Alissa Karl

In this course we will analyze how British texts since 1900 (mostly novels, but also some short fiction, poetry, and probably film) deal with a topic that impacts us all: Money. Money will provide an entry point for our inquiries about a number of significant social and historical changes across the twentieth century. We will examine not only how literary texts handle such matters, but how literary form and technique have evolved over the past 100 or so years. Authors studied will likely include Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, Sam Selvon, and Hanif Kureishi, among others. Expect to write at least one short and one long paper, and to complete a substantial group project.

ENG 380.01: Early American Gothic
MWF 1:25-2:15
Dr. Janie Hinds


ENG 386.01: African-American Women in Literature
TR 9:30-10:45
Dr. Althea Tait

This course invites students to engage in an intersectional examination of 20th Century African American women's literature, which looks at the ways in which multiple forms of discrimination overlap and inflict difficulties upon black female writers and the characters at the center of the novels; the examination also seeks to comprehend the difficulties that lead to unsettling triumph, even if the victory manifests for the next generation. The very title of the course invites interrogation of boundaries and categories, as the novels to be covered (i.e. Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, Toni Morrison's Sula, Edwidge Danticat's The Dew Breaker, Gayle Jones' Corrigedora, and Paule Marshalle's Brown Girl: Brownstones, etc.) are authored by African & American female writers who identify with having an African diasporic heritage and with the experience of being black and female in the American context.

This broader focus is aligned with the growing emphasis on the black transnational discussion that takes place within America. Using the position espoused by Simone Drake and others, we will seek to understand how these writers have roots in the African American culture while having ties to other places in the world; thus we will investigate the changing concept of an African & American female writer and the narratives that are produced. We will seek to understand the ways in which the genealogy of narratives remains consistent with respect to certain themes while simultaneously changing in dynamic ways as our understanding of race, class, gender (to list a few sites where intersectionality is at work) change. We will probe also the nature of the publishing industry for black female American writers. Students will also screen documentaries and engage in close listening sessions related to the material.

Through careful readings and a concentration on the process of becoming better scholars, students will engage in the process of research and writing analyses related to their individual interest in the material.

ENG 396.01 Children's Literature: Social Protest and the Child
TR 11-12:15
Dr. Kristen Proehl

With texts ranging from "Little Red Riding Hood" to Dr. Seuss'sThe Lorax, this course offers an extensive survey of children's literature and its social, literary, and historical contexts.Synthesizing secondary readings in critical race studies, postcolonial theory, feminist and queer studies, and the history of childhood, we will focus principally upon understanding therelationship between children's literature and social change. We will ask the following questions, among others:How and why has children's literature so often served as a medium for social criticism? How is protest portrayed inchildren's literature?How have children's authors and illustrators invoked the figure of the "innocent child" to advocate for social justice? When and how does children's literature critique social hierarchies of race, gender, and class? What makes a children's book controversial? Our readings may include J.M. Barrie'sPeter Pan, Laura Ingalls Wilder'sLittle House on the Prairie, Frances Hodgson Burnett'sThe Secret Garden, Ezra Jack Keats'sThe Snowy Day,Maurice Sendak'sWhere the Wild Things Are, the Harry Potter series, Jacqueline Woodson'sFeathers,Louise Erdrich'sThe Birchbark House, and many others. Through writing assignments, class discussions, historical research, and close analysis exercises, this course will also further enhance your critical reading, writing, and communication skills.

Children's Literature: And the Award Goes to…
ENG 396.61
SLN
Dr. Megan Norcia

The world of children's book awards is longstanding and competitive. This semester we will be working our way through the Newbery award winners (an award established in the 1920s), the Coretta Scott King award winners (an award established in the 1970s), and the Pura Belpré award winners (an award established in the 1990s). We will review how the awards, their criteria, and their winners reflect changing social norms, cultural values, attitudes about childhood and what children should read. Since this is an online class, students will have the opportunity to engage in independent projects and "presentations," and to select some of the course readings from the pool of award winners. The goals of this course are to increase students' familiarity with the rich history of children's literature, to help readers gain an understanding of "childhood" as an eighteenth-century construct, and to study the ways in which this construct has been amended, altered, and revised in a contemporary context. Through the writing of online Discussion Board posts, discussion of picture books, and formal writing assignments, students will develop a facility for thinking and writing about seemingly simple literature, and will craft detailed arguments supported by textual evidence.

**This course will be conducted entirely online with no synchronous meetings.

ENG 397.01: Young Adult Lit: Interrogating the Coming-of-Age Narrative
TR 9:30-10:45
Dr. Kristen Proehl

Covering texts ranging from Little WomentoThe Hunger Games, this course will investigate the key themes, issues, and conventions of young adult literature. We will focus principally on the coming-of-age narrative and texts that interrogate, establish, and disrupt its conventions.Withsecondary readings in critical race studies, cultural studies, and feminist and queer theory, we will discuss related issues of censorship, social criticism, and the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class in YA literature. Our readings will include literature marketed to adolescent audiences, as well as texts that are frequently assigned at the middle-and high-school levels. Key texts may include Sherman Alexie's The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, John Knowles'sA Separate Peace, Jacqueline Woodson'sHush, Stephen Crane'sThe Red Badge of Courage, the Harry Potter series,Alison Bechdel'sFun Home, Sandra Cisneros's The House on Mango Street,Alice Walker'sThe Color Purple, Thanhha Lai's Inside Out and Back Again, and others.Together, we will work to understand and develop our own definitions of key terms for this course such as "adolescence," "graphic novel," "fantasy," "realism," "dystopian fiction," and others. Through writing assignments, class discussions, historical research, and close analysis exercises, this course will also further enhance your critical reading, writing, and communication skills.

ENG 397.02 Young Adult Literature: Utopia/Dystopia
M 6:30-9:15
Dr. Megan Norcia

Required high school reading lists, popular films, recreational reading, and critics' award lists are peppered with dystopian texts for young people. Adolescent readers are at a point in their lives when rebellion seems important and necessary as they struggle with autonomy from authority figures, and so too do the characters in these texts test the bounds of individuality in the face of repressive authority. Writers from Orwell and Bradbury onward have prognosticated that technology, medicine, public health, racism, cultural norms of beauty, celebrity culture, violence, and government regulation may lead to a dystopian future. Both utopian and dystopian texts use the problems of the present to project a vision of a potential future, either to warn or to encourage. In this course we will establish a baseline of classic dystopian texts with their common features and concerns; we will use this to assess contemporary dystopian texts written for adolescents; we will also be reading Handmaid's Tale in anticipation of Atwood's planned visit to campus. In the final third of the course we will apply the characteristics of dystopian texts which we have established together to four contemporary novels which are outside the dystopian genre. This will help us evaluate where our world is plotted on the continuum between utopia and dystopia, as well as to speculate who has access to the promise of utopia.

ENG 451.01: Romantic Era
MWF 12:20-1:10
Dr. T. Gregory Garvey


ENG 472.01 The Curious Case of the Adapted Detective
MWF 2:30-3:20
Dr. Miriam Burstein

What happens when literary works are translated into different genres, media, or cultural forms? This course introduces students to the burgeoning fields of adaptation and appropriation theory, using one of the world's most frequently adapted characters, Sherlock Holmes, as its unifying example. As Julie Sanders has argued in Adaptation and Appropriation (2006), "adaptation" and "appropriation" occupy a continuum of greater or lesser deference to the original. Thus, to use a Holmesian example, the Granada television version of The Hound of the Baskervilles is an adaptation that aims to translate A. C. Doyle's original novel into dramatic terms; by contrast, the Hounds of Baskerville, an episode of the recent series Sherlock, appropriates elements of the original to construct an entirely new plot reflecting twenty-first century concerns. Not surprisingly, adaptation and appropriation occupy a slippery intellectual slope, and the blurry boundaries between the two concepts remain the subject of heated debate. No previous reading of the original Sherlock Holmes stories required. Assignments include several stories by A. C. Doyle, including A Study in Scarlet and The Hound of the Baskervilles; Michael Dibdin's Last Sherlock Holmes Story; Charles Marowitz's Sherlock's Last Case; Michael Chabon's The Final Solution; Mitch Cullin's A Slight Trick of the Mind; theoretical readings. Short paper, prospectus, annotated bibliography, research project, group oral presentation.

ENG 472.02: Senior Capstone Seminar
Objects, Others, and Things in Eighteenth-Century British Literature
TR 3:30-4:45
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot

This capstone seminar will explore the world of objects in eighteenth-century British literature and culture. Students will read literature that focuses on everyday objects, fashion and dress, and other things that become objects of exchange in the eighteenth century; this means our analysis will extend from popular commodities and objects of dress, to the relationship between animals, humans, and objects and the construction of ideas about wealth, property and sentimental feelings. We will read poetry, it-narratives (where objects and animals begin to speak for themselves and tell their own stories), essay periodicals, a fictional travel narrative, an autobiographical slave narrative, and a novel.The concern with objects and their representation in art and literature will be our main focus, as we look at multiple genres and cultural contexts (including images of material artifacts, representations of objects in fine art, and accounts of lost objects in newspapers, for example).We will also consider human rights and animal ethics contexts when we discuss the representation of humans and animals as objects of exchange in eighteenth-century literature.

ENG 473.01 Linguistic and Second Language Acquisition
TR 2-3:15
Dr. Ewelina Barski-Moskal

This course is recommended for all students planning to teach English, Spanish or French as a second language. It covers the following core linguistic components: Phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics. Additionally language change and second language acquisition (theories and in the classroom) will be discussed. This course includes a practical OPI (oral proficiency interview) component where students will have the opportunity to work with proficiency standards by listening to and rating oral language samples on a variety of topics in preparation for the OPI.

ENG 491.01 Advanced Fiction Workshop
TR 2-3:15
Dr. Anne Panning

In this course, students will produce at least two original short stories for critique and feedback. We will read a wide variety of literary magazines and write reviews of them. There will be regular quizzes and exercises in class to accompany assigned reading. You must have taken (and passed) ENG 210 and ENG 304 or 306 to take this course.

ENG 493.01 Advanced Literary Nonfiction Workshop
R 6:30-9:15
Dr. Stephen Fellner

This course is going to be fundamentally different than most non-fiction workshops; insomuch as, we'll be looking at fiction. We will explore how you can use non-fictional elements to transform fiction into something more. For this course, the primary texts will be fiction stories you have already written for your other classes such as Intro to Creative Writing, Fiction Workshop, and Advanced Fiction Workshop. Or even stories you wrote when you were in kindergarten, primary school, junior high, and/or high school. Science-fiction, horror, fantasy, young adult, and children's literature will be STRONGLY ENCOURAGED.

ENG 495.01 / 595.01, Writer's Craft
W 6:30-9:15
Dr. Jim Whorton

In this course we will study the craft of fiction and nonfiction in prose and poetry. The course accompanies the Brockport Writers Forum. Students will meet with visiting writers to discuss their work. Though it is required for students in the creative writing program, this course is open to all and may be repeated for credit.

Fall 2016 Graduate Course Descriptions

595.01, Writer's Craft
W 6:30-9:15
Dr. Jim Whorton

In this course we will study the craft of fiction and nonfiction in prose and poetry. The course accompanies the Brockport Writers Forum. Students will meet with visiting writers to discuss their work. Though it is required for students in the creative writing program, this course is open to all and may be repeated for credit.

ENG 600.01 Introduction to Graduate Studies
R 6:30-9:15
Dr. Alissa Karl

Introduces MA-Lit Track students to research methods in English at the graduate level and to literary theory as applicable to course work in the discipline. Requires independent research, work with peers, interaction with guest scholars, and a conference-length research paper and presentation.

ENG 606.01: Early British Literature: Chaucer
MW 5:05-6:20
Dr. Stefan Jurasinski

Our focus will be on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. We will learn how to read Chaucer's Middle English and then consider most of the tales, considering along the way aspects of late medieval religion, politics and culture, with some attention given to other primary texts that shed light on Chaucer's work. Topics to be considered may include: Chaucer's relationship to the Wycliffite ("Lollard") movement, the generic conventions of late medieval writing, and the afterlife of Chaucer's work in Scotland and England.

ENG 611.01 Literary Approach to the Bible
M 6:30-9:15
Dr. Austin Busch

Literary Approaches to the Bible focuses on select biblical texts (e.g., the New Testament Gospels or Genesis) and examines them closely from various literary-critical perspectives, in dialogue with specialized methodologies developed within the field of biblical studies. It also explores how those biblical texts inform later English, American, or World literature. The course may examine the biblically engaged works of a specific author (e.g., Dostoevsky or Faulkner) or it may trace how a single biblical tradition (e.g., the story of Jesus or of King David) is revised in a broad range of later writings. The precise course plan for the fall semester has not yet been determined.

ENG 632.01 American Natl & Cosmo
W 6:30-9:15
Dr. T. Gregory Garvey


ENG 690.01 Advanced Writing
R 6:30-9:15
Dr. Megan Obourn

To be taken upon completion of 12 graduate credit hours. A grade of "B-" or higher is required to proceed to ENG 697: Advanced Project in Literature.

This course is designed to acquaint graduate students with common research and writing practices in the disciplines of literary study. Students are required to practice research skills and produce annotated bibliographies and other summaries of sources. Written projects also include peer reviews, abstracts, a conference-length paper and an article-length paper. The article-length paper is developed from a paper written from a course already completed.

Since ENG 690 aims to advance students' research and writing skills, the main textbook for the class is the MLA Handbook. Course content will be 1) researched by students themselves; and 2) contributed by visiting lecturers, whose own scholarly publications will constitute some of the working models for the course.

The final project for this course will be an annotated bibliography and an article-length (30-page scholarly essay) that contributes substantially to current discussions within its field of focus.

The annotated bibliography and final essay constitute the proposal for the culminating project to be produced in ENG 697.

ENG 691.01 Prose Workshop
T 6:30-9:15
Dr. Anne Panning

This is a prose workshop, meaning you will be writing short fiction and/or creative nonfiction. You will write at least two original works, as well as engage in a storytelling project. You will also read two book-length works of fiction/creative nonfiction and write review essays of them. Additionally, students will present their work at a public reading at the end of the semester.

ENG 697.01 Advanced Project
Dr. T. Gregory Garvey

Spring 2016 Advising Guide

Last Updated 10/16/19

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