Fall 2018 Advisement Guide

Main Page Content

Majors reservation week is April 2 through April 6. See your advisor that week to sign up early for Fall 2018 English classes.

Professor Haytock and Professor Hinds are away on sabbatical. If one of them is your advisor, you have been assigned a temporary advisor for this year. Check the bulletin board in the English department office or email mburstein@brockport.edu.

Jump to:

Literature Concentration Advising Guide

Creative Writing Concentration Advising Guide

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Graduate Course Descriptions

Literature Track Advising Guide, Fall 2018

Literary Analysis    

ENG 303.01  Intro to Literary Analysis  MWF 1:25-2:15 Burstein, Miriam
ENG 303.02  Intro to Literary Analysis  MWF 12:20-1:10 Haytock, Jennifer
ENG 303.03  Intro to Literary Analysis  TR  

12:30-1:45

 

Norcia, Megan

ENG 303.04  Intro to Literary Analysis  MWF 10:10-11:00 Hinds, Janie

Shakespeare     

ENG 323.01 Shakespeare: Histories & Tragedies  TR 11:00-12:15 Slater, Michael
ENG 323.02 Shakespeare: Histories & Tragedies  TR 3:30-4:45 Slater, Michael

British Lit before 1800     

ENG 352.01 Early British Magazine Culture  TR 11:00-12:15 Kerfoot, Alicia
ENG 370.01 Beowulf & Its World  MWF 2:30-3:20 Jurasinski, Stefan
ENG 430.01 The Long Eighteenth Century  TR 2:00-3:15 Kerfoot, Alicia

British Lit after 1800  

ENG 231.01 British Literature II MWF 12:20-1:10 Burstein, Miriam
ENG 233.01 Sex and Money in British Literature TR 12:30-1:45 Karl, Alissa
ENG 321.01 Rewriting the Pilgrim's Progress MWF 9:05-9:55 Burstein, Miriam

American Lit before 1900     

ENG 235.01 Introduction to African-American Literature TR 11:00-12:15 Marah, John
ENG 240.01 American Literature I MWF 1:25-2:15 Young, Phil
ENG 242.01 Legacies of Slavery TR 9:30-10:45 Tait, Althea
ENG 382.01 Early American Gothic MWF 12:20-1:10 Hinds, Janie

American Lit after 1900     

ENG 235.01 Introduction to African-American Literature TR 11:00-12:15 Marah, John
ENG 242.01 Legacies of Slavery TR 9:30-10:45 Tait, Althea
ENG 389.01 Environmental Literature TR 2:00-3:15 Black, Ralph
ENG 455.01 World War I Remakes the United States MWF 1:25-2:15 Haytock, Jennifer

World Literature    

ENG 243.01 Immigration in Modern World Literature & Film TR 12:30-1:45 Allen, Sharon
ENG 319.01 Comparative Literature: Crossings TR 9:30-10:45 Allen, Sharon
ENG 353.01 HON-Bible and Modernity MWF 2:30-3:20 Busch, Austin

Capstone     

ENG 472.01 Capstone Seminar TR 3:30-4:45 Tait, Althea

Upper-division electives may be chosen from the above 300- or 400-level classes, or from the following:   

ENG 224.01 Filming Rome MWF 10:10-11:00 Busch, Austin
ENG 300.01 Advanced Composition TR 2:00-3:15 Karl, Alissa
ENG 304.01 Fiction Workshop TR 12:30-1:45 Panning, Anne
ENG 304.02 Fiction Workshop TR 2:00-3:15 Panning, Anne
ENG 305.61 Poetry Workshop online   Fellner, Stephen
ENG 306.01 Literary Nonfiction Workshop TR 12:30-1:45 Black, Ralph
ENG 307.01 Playwriting TR 12:30-1:45 Fellner, Stephen
ENG 348.01 Sex, Gender, and Literary Theory MW 3:35-4:50 Obourn, Milo
ENG 397.01 Young Adult Literature TR 9:30-10:45 Proehl, Kristen
ENG 397.02 Young Adult Literature TR 2:00-3:15 Proehl, Kristen
ENG 476.01 American Dialects MW 5:05-6:20 Jurasinski, Stefan
ENG 482.01 Children's Literature M 6:30-9:15 Norcia, Megan
ENG 482.61 Children's Literature online   Norcia, Megan
ENG 485.01 Professional Writing TR 12:30-1:45 Kerfoot, Alicia
ENG 491.01 Advanced Fiction Workshop M 6:30-9:15 Whorton, James
ENG 492.01 Advanced Poetry Workshop TR 5:00-6:15 Black, Ralph
ENG 495.01 Writer's Craft W 6:30-9:15 Whorton, James
FLM 301.01 Film Theory and Criticism TR 11:00-12:15 Soles, Carter
FLM 303.01 Ecocinema TR 9:30-10:45 Soles, Carter
FLM 360.01 Film Horror TR 2:00-3:15 Soles, Carter

  

Creative Writing Track Advising Guide, Fall 2018

Literary Analysis

ENG 303.01    Intro to Literary Analysis MWF 1:25-2:15 Bursteing, Miriam
ENG 303.02 Intro to Literary Analysis MWF 12:20-1:10 Haytock, Jennifer
ENG 303.03 Intro to Literary Analysis TR 12:30-1:45 Norcia, Megan
ENG 303.04 Intro to Literary Analysis MWF 10:10-11:00 Hinds, Janie

Introduction to Creative Writing

ENG 210.01 Intro to Creative Writing TR 9:30-10:45  Metzger, Thomas
ENG 210.02 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 1:25-2:15  Iuppa, Mary Jo
ENG 210.03 Intro to Creative Writing TR 2:00-3:15  Fellner, Stephen
ENG 210.04 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 11:15-12:05  Cedeno, Sarah
ENG 210.06 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 2:30-3:20  Iuppa, Mary Jo

British Literature

ENG 231.01 British Literature II MWF 12:20-1:10 Burstein, Miriam
ENG 233.01 Sex and Money in British Literature TR 12:30-1:45 Karl, Alissa
ENG 321.01 Rewriting the Pilgrim's Progress MWF 9:05-9:55 Burstein, Miriam
ENG 323.01 Shakespeare: Histories & Tragedies TR 11:00-12:15 Slater, Michael
ENG 323.02 Shakespeare: Histories & Tragedies TR 3:30-4:45 Slater, Michael
ENG 352.01 Early British Magazine Culture TR 11:00-12:15 Kerfoot, Alicia
ENG 370.01 Beowulf & Its World MWF 2:30-3:20 Jurasinski, Stefan
ENG 430.01 The Long Eighteenth Century TR 2:00-3:15 Kerfoot, Alicia

American Literature

 
ENG 235.01 Introduction to African-American Literature TR 11:00-12:15 Marah, John
ENG 240.01 American Literature I MWF 1:25-2:15 Young, Phil
ENG 242.01 Legacies of Slavery TR 9:30-10:45 Tait, Althea
ENG 382.01 Early American Gothic MWF 12:20-1:10 Hinds, Janie
ENG 389.01 Environmental Literature TR 2:00-3:15 Black, Ralph
ENG 455.01 World War I Remakes the United States MWf 1:25-2:15 Haytock, Jennifer

World Literature   

ENG 243.01 Immigration in Modern World Literature & Film TR 12:30-1:45 Allen, Sharon
ENG 319.01 Comparative Literature: Crossings TR 9:30-10:45 Allen, Sharon
ENG 353.01 HON-Bible and Modernity MWF 2:30-3:20 Busch, Austin

Fiction or Nonfiction Workshop    

ENG 304.01 Fiction Workshop TR 12:30-1:45 Panning, Anne
ENG 304.02 Fiction Workshop  TR 2:00-3:15 Panning, Anne
ENG 306.01 Literary Nonfiction Workshop TR 12:30-1:45 Black, Ralph
ENG 307.01 Playwriting TR 12:30-1:45 Fellner, Stephen

Poetry Workshop

ENG 305.61 Poetry Workshop Online   Fellner, Steve

Advanced Workshop    

ENG 491.01 Advanced Fiction Workshop M 6:30-9:15 Whorton, James
ENG 492.01 Advanced Poetry Workshop TR 5:00-6:15 Black, Ralph

Writer's Craft    

ENG 495.01 Writer's Craft W 6:30-9:15 Whorton, James

Upper-division electives may be chosen from the above 300- or 400-level classes, or from the following:   

ENG 224.01 Filming Rome MWF 10:10-11:00  Busch, Austin
ENG 300.01 Advanced Composition TR 2:00-3:15  Karl, Alissa
ENG 348.01 Sex, Gender, and Literary Theory MW 3:35-4:50  Obourn, Milo
ENG 397.01 Young Adult Literature TR 9:30-10:45  Proehl, Kristen
ENG 397.02 Young Adult Literature TR 2:00-3:15  Proehl, Kristen
ENG 476.01 American Dialects MW 5:05-6:20  Jurasinski, Stefan
ENG 482.01 Children's Literature M 6:30-9:15 Norcia, Megan
ENG 482.61 Children's Literature online   Norcia, Megan
ENG 485.01 Professional Writing TR 12:30-1:45 Kerfoot, Alicia
FLM 301.01 Film Theory and Criticism TR 11:00-12:15 Soles, Carter
FLM 303.01 Ecocinema TR 9:30-10:45 Soles, Carter
FLM 360.01 Film Horror TR 2:00-3:15 Soles, Carter

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

ENG 102 Fundamentals of College Composition (A). For students who need practice in expository writing skills. Provides intensive work in writing standard, edited English as preparation for entering ENG 112. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ENG 112 College Composition (A,Q). Develops skills in composition, critical inquiry and information literacy. Students generate, revise and edit several essays with special attention to the writing process. Includes an argumentative research paper that incorporates critical analysis of various sources and the use of proper documentation. 3cr. every semester. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ENG 210 Creative Writing (A,P). Examines techniques for writing poetry, prose, and/or creative nonfiction and requires students to critique each other's and to revise their own work. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ENG 224.01 Filming Rome
Dr. Austin Busch
This course focuses on a number of social issues that confronted the ancient Roman world, especially slavery and human trafficking, persecution of religious and ethnic minorities, and political instability and civic violence. It explores them through a study of select ancient Roman historical and literary writings, and also considers how depictions of Rome in contemporary film, television, and theatrical productions use these issues as ciphers for related concerns of today. These modern popular cultural artifacts tend to presume ancient Romans were basically just like us (only wearing togas!). We will test this assumption by careful comparison of how modern media representations and ancient literary sources suggest Romans dealt with social problems that remain familiar to us today.

ENG 231.01 British Literature II
Dr. Miriam Burstein
This course offers a grand tour of major British authors from the Romantic period to World War I. Along the way, we will dwell on topics ranging from changing attitudes to self-consciousness to new developments in poetic genres. We will pay particular attention to sensations of unease, fear, and terror—responses not confined to the Gothic alone! Our main textbook will be the Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. II, plus Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Ford Madox Ford's The Good Soldier. Two papers, midterm, final, quizzes.

ENG 233.01 Sex, Money Brit Lit
Dr. Alissa Karl
In this course we'll read poems about prostitutes, stories about working women and mooching men, and a range of things in between. Our aim will be to explore how sex, gender, money, class and wealth—and how they're related—emerge and change in British literature of the past 200 years. Our consistent focus will be understanding how sex, gender and economics are related to one another throughout the two centuries—and particularly the economic terms and constructs through which women and femininity are positioned.
Among our topics will be matters of sexual propriety (and impropriety); gendered conventions and expectations for persons of varying class positions; marriage, the marriage "market" and mercenary marriages; what happens with sex (and love) between persons of different economic standing; who can (or should) work and earn money (and who shouldn't); and changes to all of the above across two centuries. We'll explore a range of genres (including poetry, short fiction, novels, essays, drama and film) and develop an understanding of how literature helps us think about the above topics, to sharpen our critical reading skills, and to use our literary insights to reflect upon matters of sex and money in our own historical context.

ENG 235.01 Intro Afro-Amer Lit
Dr. John Marah
Cross-listed as AAS 235. Provides an introductory survey of the literature of people of African ancestry in the Americas. Acquaints students with major literary figures and significant historical periods. Discusses issues regarding the relationship between the writers and socio-political and cultural movements and questions concerning the socio-cultural function that the black writer serves for his/her community. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ENG 240.01 American Lit I
Dr. Phil Young
Surveys texts written in or about America prior to the Civil War. May include exploration and captivity narratives, Puritan writing, writing of the American Revolution, and major romantic authors such as Emerson, Fuller, Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, and Stowe. 3 Cr.Every Semester.

ENG 242.01 Legacies of Slavery
Dr. Althea Tait
This course is designed to examine narratives that focus on the dynamics of power that shaped the institution of slavery and subsequent civilized, raced forms of oppression in America. Students will read and probe texts ranging in date from the 1780s (Olaudah Equiano's 1789 The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano) to the present (Colson Whitehead's 2017 The Underground Railroad).

For earlier period works, students will read both works authored by slaves and works written by free black people which reveal a different perspective of the legacies of slavery. This course draws heavily on cultural studies as a way to inform our understanding of the literary works to be examined; for instance, as a way to study the palimpsest of new forms of slavery for black families, students will read a portion of The New Jim Crow, Michelle Wright's study of what some critics describe as the black male genocide based on unusually high imprisonment rates for black males which correlate to similar high rates of imposed imprisonment of black men just after the Reconstruction.

ENG 243.01 Immigration in Lit
Dr. Sharon Lubkemann Allen
The immigrant, migrant, émigré, and exile have long been the subjects of stories and histories; and while historically marginalized and struggling to find a voice, those immigrants who do are often received as (re)visionary storytellers, representing cultures with critical insight and creative imagination from those margins. The writing of immigrants, who cross between cultures, often challenges what either culture might think of itself or the other. The immigrant figures as point of contact and conflict, of dialogue and dispute, dissolving the distance between different cultures now compressed within consciousness. In this course, we explore transcultural experiences and encounters represented in contemporary fiction, literary non-fiction, film, and fine art. We retrace a few of the countless trajectories taken by twenty- and twenty-first century immigrants. We confront what it takes and feels like and means to make complex geo-cultural crossings. We consider why and how it is that people are uprooted and transplanted, compelled to take root and cultivate growth in foreign soil. We are challenged by the ways these writers, directors, and artists interrogate various kinds of borders and boundaries and redefine national, racial, ethnic, religious, gender and other geo-cultural constructs, while pushing also beyond conventional confines of genre. We consider how they represent the different degrees and kinds of agency, autonomy, and authority experienced in the migration, immigration, emigration, and trafficking. We attend to what is lost—and found—in cultural transgression, transposition, translation, and transformation.
We focus on a series of trajectories: from East and Middle East to West (East Asia, Russia and Eastern Europe, and the Middle East to Western Europe, North and South America); from the South (Africa and Latin America) to the North (Europe and North America); and back (from North and South America to East Asia, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East). With each crossing we "see double, think double" as Hoffman writes, about here and there, self and other, no longer entirely outside, but transposed and translated within consciousness, provoking new questions, critique, conscience, and creativity.
This course is informed by feminist and post-colonial theory and comparative cultural semiotics. Gender and sexuality are central concerns in almost all of the works considered in this course. While we read a range of writers, we focus on complex and conflicting experiences of and perspectives on gender and sexuality generated in critically and creatively (re)visionary works by women writers and filmmakers including Lispector, Akerman, Kogut, Ulitskaya, Sebbar, Satrapi, Bouraoui, Sciamma, Lahiri, Mukherjee, and Nair. We confront violence ranging from rape, sex trafficking, and the fatal exploitation of women as drug mules, to much more mundane and muted everyday trauma, in fiction and film by both women and men (Makine, Hemon, Moodysson). We consider the particular difficulties for women and transgender writers finding their voice in the context of transcultural crossings. We consider how gender interacts with genre, re-casting history and reframing story.

ENG 300 Advanced Composition
Dr. Alissa Karl
Advanced Composition helps college writers develop skills that will be of use in upper-division courses, graduate school, and professional life. The course is broken roughly into two (related) halves: in the first part of the semester, we will study and experiment with genre and rhetorical situation in order to become adept at decoding what kinds of writing are called for and when and to understand what different kinds of written address imply and demand of us. In the second half of the course, we will take a close look at different ways that effective arguments can be made, deploying both personal experience and careful research to craft successful arguments. This is a writing-intensive course in which you will undertake substantial independent work to become a self-directed writer who is capable of making effective choices in all kinds of writing situations.

ENG 302 Business Writing and Computers (B). Required for business majors. Allows students to expand word processing skills to prepare communications for the business world, including letters, memos, reports, and job applications. Emphasizes editing skills. Cannot be counted for the English major. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ENG 303 Introduction to Literature Analysis (A). For English majors and prospective majors. Provides skills needed to understand literature in English. Includes close reading of selected texts and study of literary genres, critical terms, and the relationship between text and context. Provides practice in writing literary analyses. Emphasizes skills of generating, rewriting, and editing the documented critical essay and other nonfiction prose suitable to the needs and future careers of English majors. Majors and minors must earn a "C" or better. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ENG 304 Fiction Workshop
Dr. Anne Panning
In this course students will focus on the art and craft of writing short fiction. The course will be divided into three 5-week sessions: 1) Creativity 101: How to Steal Like an Artist; 2) 'Zines: The Making of Your Own Small Magazine; and 3) Short Story Workshops: Conceptualizing, Crafting and Critiquing Short Fiction.

ENG 305.61 Poetry Workshop
Dr. Stephen Fellner
Prerequisite: ENG 210. Examines the substances and processes of writing poetry through contemporary study and objective workshop criticism of student writing. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ENG 306.01 Literary Nonfiction Wkshp
Dr. Ralph W. Black
Prerequisite: ENG210. This course will introduce students to diverse subgenres of creative non-fiction such as domestic memoir, travel writing, graphic novels, and critical reviews among others. Students will develop a greater array of formal possibilities and areas of content in their own non-fiction writing. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ENG 307.01 Playwriting
Dr. Stephen Fellner
Introduces students to full-length plays and the wide array of subgenres related to theatre: the extended dramatic monologue, choreopoems, verse plays, the 10-minute play, among others. Through intensive reading practices, students will learn how to employ various formal strategies in their own work. 3 Cr.

ENG 319.01 Comparative Literature
Dr. Sharon Lubkemann Allen
Any comparative study of literature involves the critic's crossing—between texts, geo-cultural and/or critical contexts, and so on. In this course, we cross-examine texts themselves concerned with crossings, with literal, linguistic, and literary transgressions, transpositions, and transformations. While we will try to understand these texts partly in terms of their discrete cultural contexts, our comparative inquiry will be focused on close reading of the text. The scope of our understanding will be both broadened and refined by examining texts crossing between different cultural geographies and genres, reconsidered through layered critical lenses.

Our writing about strangers and the sense of estrangement in these strange literary texts is aimed at cultivating the creative and critical capacities inherent in defamiliarization and dialogue. My hope is that the dislocations that render our own language relative will generate more reflexively critical, nuanced and insightful analyses. More aware of discursive conventions because of our crossings between cultures and discourses, we refine our capacities to communicate and create. We recognize ourselves in Soyinka's description of the writer in his essay on Rushdie: "a creature in a permanent state of exile" crossing frontiers in the real world through re-orientations in language and imagination.

The texts we read are aligned up to allow us to explore particular literary motifs and methods with increasing sophistication, nuance, critical self-awareness and insight. We begin with short fiction and "non-fictional" essays on outsideness by Rawet, Bakhtin, Brodsky, and Aciman, then turn to Khrzhanovsky's film A Room and a Half as bridge between fiction and non-fiction, cinematic documentary and fiction, reading it as both adaptation of Brodsky's memoir and as Khrzhanovsky's own cultural autobiography and film essay on aesthetics. The central motifs we consider here include the relation between language and landscape (literal and literary), boundaries of genre and cultural geography. We read these short texts closely in order to understand not only different dimensions, but also dynamics of memory (cultural and personal memory, intertextual memory, etc.). As we learn to navigate these texts, we chart our course by learning to recognize discrete literary structures, strategies, devices. We refine our capacity to navigate with these tools as we read longer, more complex texts.
The second section of the course turns to novels and non-fictional narratives by Hoffman, Makine, and Bouraoui, concerned with coming of age caught between worlds and words, landscapes and languages, cultural geographies and speech genres. In the third section of the course, we look at works that retrace crossings in the context of cultural ruptures and that disrupt generic conventions. In works by Sis, Kundera, and Satrapi, we critically consider the relation between art, music, and writing, both as these structure consciousness within the texts and as they structure the texts. Our fourth section concerns modes and limits of reconfiguration, re-invention, regeneration in works by Barreto, Sant'Anna, Ulitskaya, and Agualusa. In the fifth part of the course, we consider films by Akerman, Kieslowski, and Kogut, comparing these with fiction by Antunes—works concerned with return, resonances, response and responsiblity, re-mapping and re-casting cultural memory, revenge and reconciliation. Finally, we read and pursue a creative and critical project concerned with the traces left on people, things, books in their crossings.

ENG 321.01 Rewriting Pilgrim's Progress
Dr. Miriam Burstein
John Bunyan's allegory The Pilgrim's Progress from This World, to That Which is to Come (1678) was, along with the Bible, everywhere in Protestant households until the early twentieth century. Moreover, its popularity as a missionary evangelical and pedagogical tool meant that its influence extended throughout the reach of the British Empire. This course charts how Bunyan's work informed later experiments in narrative form—not just in terms of its Christian allegory, but also its narrative structure (including the shape of the "pilgrimage" itself). In the process of reading novels from England, South Africa, and the United States, students will explore how authors transformed the significance of Christian's quest, whether by secularizing its outcome, granting new political and religious meanings to its many dangers, or undermining outright its central claims. Two papers, midterm, final, quizzes, oral presentation. This course can be applied to the minor in Religion and Culture.

ENG 323 Shakespeare's Histories and Tragedies
Dr. Michael Slater
In a superb metaphor, Northrup Frye explains that "tragic heroes are so much the highest points in their human landscape that they seem the inevitable conductors of the power about them, great trees more likely to be struck by lightning than a clump of grass." If tragic heroes are great, towering figures, perhaps none stand taller than Shakespeare's. We tend to identify his greatest characters and plays with the tragedies—Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and King Lear, to name only a few. Not unlike his tragedies, Shakespeare's histories also center on supremely powerful figures, usually monarchs from England's past. Frye's characterization of the tragic hero as a central "conductor of power," in fact, appears to apply just as well to many protagonists from the histories. In this course we will examine several of Shakespeare's tragedies and histories, paying particular attention to the social and historical conditions that helped to shape them. We will investigate the cultural forces and practices that inform the plays, from the Petrarchan sonnet craze in the 1590s to attitudes toward the "divine right" of kings to customs of inheritance in early modern England. But we will also consider the plays as performances within this culture, thinking about the Elizabethan stage as well as watching several modern adaptations and productions. By the end of the course, we will have developed a better understanding of tragedy in general, and of Shakespeare's tragedies and (tragic?) histories in particular.

ENG 348 Sex and Gender in Literary Theory
Dr. Milo Obourn
This course provides an advanced introduction to the traditions of literary theory and criticism related to sex and gender studies. We will closely analyze primary theoretical material as well as literature in relation to theories of gender and sexuality. The course is organized according to the "school" of criticism or theory that each of our critics works within. Most gender and sexuality theories draw on multiple schools of thought; be prepared to see overlaps in critics' approaches. Though theories of sex and gender have a long, complex and international history, we will focus on selected contemporary critical approaches largely by authors from Europe and the Americas. We will touch on sex and gender criticism in relation to structuralist, post-structuralist, psychoanalytic, queer, intersex, Marxist, critical race, postcolonial, and disability theory. This is not an exhaustive list but does cover many of the main schools of contemporary critical thinking about gender and sexuality.

The course includes both the theory itself and the applied theory: you will learn not just theoretical descriptions of gender criticism and theory, but how to use this theory in your critical thinking, reading and writing practices. To that end, we will read a novel along with some applied criticism.

ENG 352 Early British Magazine Culture
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot
This course will chart the development of magazine culture in eighteenth-century Britain. We will begin with the essay periodicals and newspapers of the early 1700s and will consider their relationship to later journals and periodicals, and finally to the literary and fashion magazines of the mid-to-late eighteenth century. These publications often included an array of types and genres of literature within them, including essays, poetry, theatrical reviews, book reviews, historical accounts, news, politics, and illustrations. We will look at excerpts from a number of periodicals from the era and will place them within their historical and cultural contexts; these contexts include topics such as: coffeehouse culture of the early eighteenth century, the periodical press, women authors and printers, gender identity, fashion and dress, cosmopolitanisms, commerce and trade, colonial expansion, the transatlantic slave trade, and artistic and literary taste. The newspapers, essay periodicals, and magazines of this era offer a fascinating window into the everyday lives of eighteenth-century British subjects, and we will spend the semester peering through that window.

ENG 353 Hon- Bible & Modernity
Dr. Austin Busch
In the first part of the course we will examine ancient literary portraits of Jesus, especially the biblical gospels, but some other early Christian writings about him as well. While we will read these texts as coherent works of literary art, we will also attend to controversial issues they raise, such as the gospels' complicated relationships to one another, the problems they present to scholars interested in reconstructing the historical figure of Jesus, and the extent to which critical analysis of them controversially challenges some religious dogma. The course's second part will focus on two modern novels that retell the story of Jesus. In considering how these novels interpret and respond to the New Testament gospels, we will confront their innovative and at times taboo portrayals of this sacred figure from literary history. However, we will also explore the possibility that the biblical stories of Jesus themselves anticipate some of the apparently innovative ideas about him presented in these modern literary works. This course can be applied to the minor in Religion and Culture.

ENG 370 Beowulf & Its World
Dr. Stefan Jurasinski
This course explores the language and culture of Anglo-Saxon England, whose most famous product is the poem Beowulf. After some instruction in the most basic aspects of the Old English (or Anglo-Saxon) language, we will read Beowulf in translation along with other texts of the period that shed light on its contents, including (but not limited to) a vision of hell and an Icelandic saga about witches and bears.

ENG 382 American Gothic
Dr. Janie Hinds
Traces the evolution of early American Gothic literature, up to around 1900. Studies the particularly American expression of this movement, rooted in the mystical and Calvinist traditions of Spanish, French, English and African immigrants that resulted in a "native" literature. 3 Cr.

ENG 389 American Literature and Environmental Imagination
Dr. Ralph Black
This interdisciplinary course explores American environmental writing from both scientific and literary perspectives and investigates the relationship between natural science, natural history and environmental literature. Examines how subjective and objective investigations of the natural world enrich one another and lead to a more complete sense of place. Course includes lectures, discussions, group presentations and field exercises emphasizing description, measurement and aesthetic response. 3 Cr.

ENG 397 Young Adult Literature
Dr. Kristen Proehl
English 397 will examine the key themes, issues, and conventions of young adult literature, with a special focus on the intersections of adolescent rebellion, conformity, and social justice. Drawing upon texts ranging from Louisa May Alcott's Little Women (1868) to Alison Bechdel's Fun Home (2006), this course will explore the dynamics of the coming-of-age narrative and works that establish, interrogate, and disrupt its conventions. Some of our key discussion topics will include censorship, pedagogy, social criticism, and the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality in YA literature. We will learn how authors have repeatedly turned to representations of rebellious adolescents in order to advocate for social change. Through group presentations, essay assignments, on-line discussion forums, and writing exercises, this course will further develop your critical reading, writing, research, and communication skills. You will also have the opportunity to play an interactive role in formulating our class discussion topics each week.

As we explore a diverse array of genres, including novels, epistolary texts, poetry, and graphic novels, among others, we will consider texts that are often assigned at the middle- and high- school levels as well as literature marketed to young adults. We will study, interrogate, and develop our own definitions of key terms, such as "adolescence," "sentimentalism," "YA literature," "fantasy," and "bildungsroman," among others. By the end of the semester, you will have developed a nuanced understanding of the relationship between literature and the historical construction of adolescence. Possible texts may include Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time, John Knowles's A Separate Peace, Jacqueline Woodson's Hush, the Harry Potter series, Suzanne Collins's The Hunger Games, Thanhha Lai's Inside Out and Back Again, and others.

ENG 430 Long 18th Century
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot
The long eighteenth century was an exciting and productive time for the development of British literature. This course offers an introduction to the major themes and texts in British literature from the Restoration of King Charles II in 1660 to the beginning of the French Revolution in 1789. The kinds of texts we will study in this survey of the long eighteenth century include: Restoration plays, the poetry of Pope, Dryden, and Swift, the early novels of Eliza Haywood and Daniel Defoe, the Gothic novels of Horace Walpole and Clara Reeve, and the sentimental texts and laughing comedies of the late century. We will study each work's relationship to its cultural and historical contexts, alongside attention to detail and close reading. The course will focus on the major eighteenth-century themes of sex, gender, and sexuality; satire, parody, and comedy; and feeling, sentiment, and emotion. We will study plays, poems, novels, and periodicals in order to consider these themes in relation to a number of literary genres.

ENG 455 WWI Remakes US (The Great War and Modern America)
Dr. Jennifer Haytock
Although often considered the "Forgotten War" or a minor dress rehearsal for the cataclysmic World War II, World War I deserves examination, or re-examination, for the ways in which it remade American society and positioned the country for the coming century. Intersecting as it did with the women's suffrage movement, the birth control movement, increased interest in eugenics, the Great Migration moving African Americans from the rural south to the urban north, Progressive reform initiatives, the war, and those who shaped it, ultimately contended with issues much broader than the threat from the Germans. A case in point is the nation's first wide-spread implementation of the draft: conscription required that men from different regions come into contact with each other, a circumstance that leaders saw as a way to integrate newer immigrants—but not blacks—into mainstream American society. Further, the military tried to implement a merit-based system of promotion, challenging lingering perceptions of hereditary methods of distinction. Post-war America saw a series of social disruptions, including the violent race riots of the Red Summer of 1919, the passing of women's suffrage, the implementation of National Prohibition, the cultural rebellions inherent in the Jazz Age, and the veterans' Bonus Army March of 1932. Americans re-thought sexuality, gender, the possibilities of democracy, and what it meant to be white.

In this course, we'll examine literary texts about U. S. participation in the Great War with particular attention to how such works register changes in attitudes toward gender, race, and class. We'll attend to historical contexts that illuminate these ideas and the discourses surrounding them. Students will be expected to direct their own learning, including preparing and delivering a group presentation on historical issues and developing, researching, and writing a substantial argumentative essay.

Texts include Borden The Forbidden Zone, Boyd Through the Wheat, Cather One of Ours, Daly Not Only War, Hemingway A Farewell to Arms, March Company K, Porter Pale Horse, Pale Rider, and selected short fiction.

ENG 472 Capstone Seminar: "Love like Lion-Eyes": Reading Love in Toni Morrison's Novels
Dr. Althea Tait
In an interview with Bill Moyers, Toni Morrison reflects, "We don't know when to stop, as Baby Suggs [a former slave] says, 'When is it [love] too much and when is it not enough?' That is the problem of the human mind and the soul." According to Morrison, the mind and soul negotiate to discern when love is too much and when, conversely, it is not enough. To compound this arduous negotiation, the mind searches for understanding as to how this exchange of love actually happens, as the protagonist Pecola reveals in The Bluest Eye when she inquires, "How do you do that? I mean how do you get someone to love you?" (32). This investigation is one that will reveal, as Martha Nussbaum has described in Love's Knowledge: Essays on Philosophy and Literature, the fictions of the soul, or the ways the mind and soul come to know and to experience love.

As we will cover in this course, various cultural experiences shape Morrison's characters' concept(s) of love (in its various forms—eros, agape, filial, phileo, and so forth). These formative cultural experiences are based on the characters' negotiations with race, class, gender, orientation, disabilities, and, among other political locations where one may be oppressed, the persistence of history.

Over the course of the semester, students will read select novels from Morrison's oeuvre including, Beloved, Love, Paradise, Song of Solomon, Lydia Diamond's theatric version of The Bluest Eye, A Mercy, Jazz. Previous reading of Morrison's literature is not required. Critical readings will include selections from Nussbaum's Love's Knowledge, bell hooks' Communion, C. S. Lewis' the Four Loves, J. M. Bouson's Quiet as it's Kept among others. Photography as well as other forms of visual studies, documentaries, and popular Hip Hop music will be used also to explore the course's framing.

Throughout the semester, students will produce a portfolio of writings to include an annotated bibliography, a short essay, a research paper proposal, and the final research essay, which students may or may not elect to present in the Undergraduate Research Symposium in the following Spring 2019 semester. Students will complete the course with a formal in-class oral presentation of their research.

ENG 476 American Dialects
Dr. Stefan Jurasinski
Considers regional and social dialects of American and British English, African-American English and its history, pidgins and creoles, and observed differences in the speech of men and women. Attention given also to matters language policy, such as the use of non-standard dialects in reading instruction or "English Only" laws. Includes instruction in use of the International Phonetic Alphabet and in the methods of descriptive grammar. 3 Cr.

ENG 482.01 Children's Literature
Dr. Megan Norcia
The Top Five... (M 6:30-9:15) LAB 107
The delightful outcome of countdowns of films or books or superfoods is that they generate lots of animated discussion, some in support of the top choices, and some incensed that their favorites were overlooked. This semester, we will apply this notion of the "Top Five" impulse to children's literature by generating, collaborating, and researching our own topical lists by genre, topic, issue, author, or era. After reading a range of children's literature, students will be invited to come up with their own Top Fives for possible publication in our library as a series of posters, flyers, or a reference book for patrons. This will be a high-impact learning experience, offering a chance to investigate the much-debated divide in children's literature scholarship: is children's literature written to instruct or to entertain? We will find out by reading and discussing poetry, novels, short excerpts, and formulating written analyses through online postings, presentations, papers, and a culminating event at our library.

ENG 482.61 Children's Literature
Dr. Megan Norcia: "And the award goes to..." (SLN)
The world of children's book awards is longstanding and competitive. This semester we will be working our way through the Newbery award winners (an award established in the 1920s), the Coretta Scott King award winners (an award established in the 1970s), the Pura Belpré award winners (an award established in the 1990s), and the Stonewall Book Award (established for children's texts in the recent 2000s). We will review how the awards, their criteria, and their winners reflect changing social norms, cultural values, attitudes about childhood and what children should read. Since this is an online class, students will have the opportunity to collaborate on a class wiki to create a poetry toolkit, to engage in independent projects analyzing award-winning picture books, and even to do "presentations." The goals of this course are to increase students' familiarity with the rich history of children's literature, to help readers gain an understanding of "childhood" as an eighteenth-century construct, and to study the ways in which this construct has been revised in a contemporary context. Through the writing of online Discussion Board posts, discussion of picture books, and formal writing assignments, students will develop a facility for thinking and writing about seemingly simple literature, and will craft detailed arguments supported by textual evidence.
**This course will be conducted entirely online with no synchronous meetings.

ENG 485.01 Professional Writing
Dr. Alicia Kerfoot
This course will offer students the chance to practice writing in a number of different professional-writing genres, including: nonprofit and arts writing (exhibition catalogues, mission statements, project proposals, grant writing, museum interpretation programs, etc.), book reviews, professional blogging and writing for the web, and public relations/communications writing (newsletters, news releases, promotional materials, etc.). We will explore these different kinds of writing with the assistance of a number of guest speakers and course readings from those who work in the fields under discussion. The course will focus on collaborative oral and written projects, as well as on developing individual writing skills and research strategies, especially with specific audiences in mind. One of the course goals is to inspire students to adapt their skills for all kinds of employment opportunities, which includes thinking about how to market those skills in cover letters and résumés.

ENG 491 Advanced Fiction Workshop
Dr. James Whorton
Prerequisite: ENG 305 and either ENG 304 or ENG 306.This is an advanced course in fiction writing. We will study short stories by a variety of writers, and each student will write two short stories to be discussed in the workshop and one book review. Written critiques will be due before every meeting, and revised stories will be due at the end of the semester. Prerequisites: ENG 305 (Poetry Workshop) and ENG 304 or 306 (Fiction or Nonfiction Workshop). Students in the creative writing concentration have first call for this class, so please email jwhorton@brockport.edu for permission to register.

Required text: Strunk and White. The Elements of Style. 4th ed. Allyn & Bacon, 1999. ISBN 0-205-31342-6

ENG 492 Advanced Poetry Workshop
Dr. Ralph Black
Prerequisite: ENG 305 and either ENG 304 or ENG 306. Focuses on original poetry writing and applied criticism. Requires intensive critical discussion, revision, and some consideration of work by selected contemporaries. May be repeated for credit. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ENG 495 Writer's Craft
Dr. James Whorton
In this course we will study the craft of fiction and nonfiction in prose and poetry. The course accompanies the Brockport Writers Forum (brockport.edu/wforum). Students will meet with visiting writers to discuss their work. Though it is required for students in the creative writing program, this course is open to all and may be repeated for credit.

Film Course Descriptions

FLM 250 Film History Part 1- Origins to 1945 (A,D,F). Traces the evolution of cinema from its origins in the 19th century through the silent era, into the Golden Age of sound cinema. Examines the major films and movements in the development of film as a global, cross-cultural art form and industry. By situating cinema historically, investigates how different cultures imagine themselves within diverse social, historical, and ideological contexts with an emphasis on aesthetics. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

FLM 251 Film History Part 2- 1945 to Present (A,D,F). Traces the evolution of cinema from WWII until the present-day "blockbuster era." Examines the major films and movements in the cross-cultural evolution of film since the emergence of the "international art cinema" in the 1950s and the new Cinemas of the 1960s. Investigates how different cultures imagine themselves within diverse social, historical, and ideological contexts as film culture becomes increasingly globalized in the latter half of the twentieth century. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

FLM 301: THEORY AND CRITICISM OF FILM
Dr. Carter Soles

Course Description: From its inception in the late 1890s through the current impacts of digital technology, film as a medium has always been subject to intense scrutiny and inquiry regarding its meanings, aesthetics, and social effects. This course offers an overview of many of these debates, examining how film scholars and cultural critics have approached the interpretation of film (and other popular media). This class will introduce you to the key terms, ideas, and discourses within the theory and criticism of film, training you to use a set of interpretative tools and analytical frameworks not only for your future academic study of film but for your everyday consumption of film and other visual media. We will pay particular attention to the application of theory and criticism: how do you take the broad ideas of theory and use them in your own interpretations? How do you take the specific interpretations of criticism and develop a broader argument that can be applied to other texts? To that end, we will examine both historically significant films as well as more contemporary films in our examination of visual media and its ideological meaning(s).

FLM 303: ECOCINEMA
Dr. Carter Soles

Course Description: While film and media scholars have always explored cinema's cultural negotiations, only quite recently (since the 1990s) have environmental and ecocritical perspectives made their way into film studies. Film affects our imagination of the world around us, and thus, potentially, our actions toward the world. In addition, cinema's various technologies, from lights and cameras to DVDs and even the seeming immateriality of the internet, consume the planet's material resources and tend to reflect badly upon cinema's direct role in impacting our ecosystems. Yet, despite certain misgivings over cinema's ecological footprint, many of us continue to love to watch movies precisely because of cinema's ability to reframe perception. Ecocinema studies enables us to recognize ways of seeing the world other than through the narrow perspective of the anthropocentric (human-centered) gaze that situates individual human desires at the center of the moral universe. This course applies contemporary ecocritical theory to fiction and documentary films in order to raise students' awareness about the ecological and environmental issues impacting the world today, and to sharpen students' critical film analysis skills.

FLM 360: FILM HORROR
Dr. Carter Soles

Course Description: Since its origins in the literary Gothic and German Expressionist cinema of the 1920s, the horror film has served as an especially rich site for examining the intersections between violence, sadism, masochism, sexuality, gender, and the power relations that structure modern culture. As a culturally "low" genre often assumed to be misogynist and depraved, and therefore beneath critical notice, horror quite often gets away with depicting much more extreme and challenging content than can most more "respectable" genres. Horror is contradictory: quite often critical of mainstream ideologies and stereotypes, it simultaneously taps into "primal" fears that exploit those same culturally conservative ideologies. (For example, slasher films always present active, admirable heroines, a possible feminist gesture, while at the same time graphically depicting the sexually charged torture of those heroines.) This course examines the historical development and major themes of the horror film genre from the 1920s to the present day. Horror has always been a global genre, and the course will attempt to account for the most significant transnational horror trends while retaining an American/Hollywood emphasis. We will respond to questions such as: How are gender and sexuality represented in the horror film? How does this genre depict power relations between the sexes? What does this genre tell us about the nuclear family and the consumerist, heterocentrist culture that takes that family structure as its foundational social unit? How does horror deal with race, class, and other categories of social oppression supported by patriarchal ideology? We will approach these questions through rigorous textual analysis of close readings of horror films released between 1920 and 2015, historical and critical readings, and class discussions.

Graduate Course Descriptions

ENG 576 American Dialects
Dr. Stefan Jurasinski
Considers regional and social dialects of American and British English, African-American English and its history, pidgins and creoles, and observed differences in the speech of men and women. Attention given also to matters language policy, such as the use of non-standard dialects in reading instruction or "English Only" laws. Includes instruction in use of the International Phonetic Alphabet and in the methods of descriptive grammar. 3 Cr.

ENG 595 Writer's Craft
Dr. James Whorton
In this course we will study the craft of fiction and nonfiction in prose and poetry. The course accompanies the Brockport Writers Forum (brockport.edu/wforum). Students will meet with visiting writers to discuss their work. Though it is required for students in the creative writing program, this course is open to all and may be repeated for credit.

ENG 600 Intro to Graduate Studies
Dr. Janie Hinds
Introduces MA-Lit Track students to research methods in English at the graduate level and to literary theory as applicable to course work in the discipline. Requires independent research, work with peers, interaction with guest scholars, and a conference-length research paper and presentation. 3 Cr. Fall.

ENG 616 Studies in English Renaissance: Shakespeare in Film
Dr. Michael Slater
"It has become a popular commonplace that had Shakespeare been born in the twentieth century, he would have been a filmmaker." So writes Douglas Lanier in an entertaining and enormously interesting essay, "William Shakespeare, filmmaker." But what exactly does it mean to suggest that Shakespeare, writing roughly three centuries before the development of motion pictures, is an especially "cinematic" writer? While his works were certainly written for performance, can we so easily elide the historical differences between sixteenth century play script and twentieth century screenplay? How do directors translate from stage to screen, and what—if anything—is lost in such a translation? What makes for a good Shakespeare film—authenticity, fidelity to the text, creativity and/or innovation? More broadly, how do we theorize adaptation?

Over the course of the semester, we will engage with these and other questions as we explore several of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies, as well as various film productions pertaining to them: Romeo and Juliet,Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, and King Lear. Readings will not only include Shakespeare's plays, various film productions, and scholarship about both, but also a range of works from the history of film criticism and theory.

ENG 632 Studies in American Literature before 1870
Dr. Philip Young
Covers selected major authors before 1870. Includes authors such as Puritan writers, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville and other important writers. Specific focus indicated by subtitle. 3 Cr.

ENG 690 Advanced Writing
Dr. Jennifer Haytock
Capstone course for the English MA, Literature track. The purpose is twofold: 1) to prepare students for the final project (ENG 697), a 30-35 page scholarly essay that contributes substantially to current discussions within the student's chosen field; 2) to acquaint students with the practices and conventions of advanced academic writing (such as peer review and revision). 3 Cr. Every Semester.

ENG 691 Prose Workshop
Dr. Anne Panning
This course will deal with both fiction and creative nonfiction and will involve intense work in a workshop format. The emphasis, of course, will be on critiquing your original work while we study how other writers pursue the craft.

We will read full-length collections of short fiction and creative nonfiction. These will serve as models for your own work, as well as show you how to experiment with craft in innovative ways. We will study how techniques of writing fiction and creative nonfiction can be blended to produce a better fiction piece, or a better work of creative nonfiction. Thus, with a little luck and a lot of hard work, each student will have at the end of the semester at least one piece of fiction or nonfiction to put on the market for publication.

This course will emphasize formal experimentation, which might include • Journal or diary entry • Letter • Quiz • List (to-do, grocery) • Recipe • Email • Facebook post • Review • Script • Agenda • Invitation• Diagnosis • Instruction manual • Graphic essay • Video essay • Menu • Manifesto •Travel guide • Interactive Map • Argument • Dictionary entries • Newspaper article • Photo essay • Redaction • Police report • Etc.

ENG 697 Advanced Project in Literature (A). Allows students to complete their final project for the MA in Literature, supervised by the Director of Graduate students and an additional reader. The project will consist of revising and enhancing a paper previously submitted in ENG 690 Advanced Writing. Successful completion of the project will include an oral defense. 3 Cr. Every Semester.

Last Updated 4/2/18

Close mobile nav