Biennial Review of High-Risk Drinking and Substance Abuse Prevention

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Category Name:
Responsible Unit: The College at Brockport, State University of New York
Responsible VP:
Adoption Date: 2015-08-01
Last Revision Date:
Last Review Date:
Shared governance: none

Policy Statement

The College at Brockport, State University of New York: Biennial Report Introduction

Part 86, the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations, requires that, as a condition of receiving funds or any other form of financial assistance under any federal program, an Institution of Higher Education (IHE) must certify that it has adopted and implemented a program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees.

In order to certify its compliance with the regulations, an IHE must adopt and implement a drug prevention program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by all students and employees both on school premises and as part of any of its activities. Creating a program that complies with the regulations requires an IHE to do the following:

  1. Prepare a written policy on alcohol and other drugs.
  2. Develop a sound method for distribution of the policy to every student and IHE staff member each year.
  3. Prepare a biennial review report on the effectiveness of its alcohol and other drug (AOD) programs and the consistency of policy enforcement.
  4. Maintain its biennial review report on file, so that, if requested to do so by the U.S. Department of Education, the campus can submit it.

The following report outlines The College at Brockport's compliance with these requirements and the current state of high-risk drinking and substance abuse prevention within our campus community.

Purpose/Scope

High-Risk Drinking & Substance Use Prevention: A Brief History

The College at Brockport views high-risk drinking, substance abuse, and the related consequences of each as barriers to the health, safety, and success of our students and community. Historically, the College has addressed these concerns in a variety of ways, including classroom presentations, residence hall and student organization programming, individual and group counseling, and policy promotion and enforcement.

The following table provides a historic view of binge drinking rates at The College at Brockport. Please note that the most recent (April 2015) data from CORE is not yet available at the time of this report.

FY01*

(2001)

n=887

 FY02*

(2002)

n=573

 FY03*

(2003)

n=763

 FY04*

(2004)

n=825

FY05

(2005)

n=953 

FY08

(2008)

n=456

 FY09

(2009)

 

FY10

(2010)

 

 FY11

(2011)

 

 FY12

(2012)

 

 65.9%*  60.6%*  57.9%*  58.8%*  47.9%  49.2%  45.5%  42.9% 42.7%    43.2%

2-Week Prevalence Rate taken from CORE Alcohol and Other Drug Survey

 *FY01-FY04 Targeted Sampling of High-Risk Populations sampling only first-year, athletes and fraternities/sororities.
FY05 Began Random Sampling of all undergraduate students
FY07 (2007) NCHA survey completed.

The following is reflective of alcohol and drug policy violation referrals and other related conduct data. The number of reported incidents related to alcohol and other drugs provides an important benchmark for the College, as well as the number of students who are sanctioned to attend a drug or alcohol educational workshop. Lastly, it is important to note that the provided data does not indicate the number of students found responsible through the Student Conduct system.

Campus Crime Statistics as Defined by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act.

Category Venue 2011 2012 2013
Liquor LawViolationsDisciplinary Referrals On Campus** 436 366 412
  In residence halls 394 308 377
  In or on a non-campus building/property 0 0 0
  On public property 2 0 0
  Total 436 366 412
 Drug LawViolationsDisciplinary Referrals  On campus**  95 107  76 
   In residence halls 65  57  47 
   In or on a non-campus building/property 0 0
  On public property 
   Total  95  107  76
 
  Alcohol Workshop Prohibited Substance Workshop Party Smart Alcohol/Drug Assessment
2011-12 253 n/a 180 50
2012-13 234 17 71 77
2013-14 224 40 108 106
2014-15 200 63 45* 52

First Time Alcohol Policy Offenders Place on Level I Conduct Probation

*An additional workshop was added and utilized to address ethical decision making and being a positive community member which diverted attendance at Party Smart to better address student needs.

While it is important to explore the history of student binge drinking behaviors, it is just as important to gain insight into how students view alcohol use within the college context. The following tables provide insight into student awareness and attitudes toward prevention programming and alcohol use.

 Students Reporting that "The College at Brockport is Concerned about the Prevention of Drug and Alcohol Use"
FY01   FY02  FY03  FY04  FY05  FY08  FY09 FY10  FY11  FY12 
 80%  79.9%  82.6%  77%  71.4%  80%  87%  87.4%  87.1%  86.5%

Statistics from CORE Alcohol and Other Drug Survey

Students Reporting that "The College at Brockport has a Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program"
FY01 FY02 FY03 FY04 FY05 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12
53% 49.7% 57.6% 49% 46.7% 51.1% 80% 82.1% 83% 82.6%

Statistics from CORE Alcohol and Other Drug Survey

Students Reporting that "The College at Brockport has Alcohol and Drug Policies"
 FY01 FY02  FY03  FY04  FY05  FY08  FY09  FY10  FY11  FY12 
 94.1% 96.4%   92.3% 93.6%  90%  93.8%  93.4%  92.9%  92.8%  92% 

Statistics from CORE Alcohol and Other Drug Survey

Students Reporting that "The College at Brockport Consistently Enforces Alcohol and Drug Policies"
FY01 FY02 FY03 FY04 FY05 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12
75.1% 76.8% 75.1% 75.2% 61.3% 77% 75.3% 77% 79% 77.5%

Statistics from CORE Alcohol and Other Drug Survey

Despite rigorous efforts to curb high-risk drinking and substance use rates, decrease student conduct incidents, and improve indicators related to campus climate related to alcohol and substance use highlighted the need for a comprehensive, evidence-based approach to prevention in the Fall of 2007.

Campus Champions: Collaboration, Commitment, and Critical Thinking

In the Fall of 2007, a work group of individual began to assess prevention efforts on The College at Brockport campus. Efforts focused on inventorying and assessing interventions at the individual, interpersonal, and community levels. This exploration led to a number of conclusions and the identification of a number of prevention "champions" on The College at Brockport campus.These interdepartmental collaborations continue:Department/Organization:
  • Director, Student Union and Activities
  • Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs, Enrollment Management and Student Affairs
  • Director, Hazen Center for Integrated Care
  • Assistant Director, Office of Residential Life & Learning Communities and Student Conduct
  • Assistant Chief, University Police
  • Graduate Assistant, Prevention and Outreach Services
  • Assistant Athletic Director, Intercollegiate Athletics
  • Chief, University Police
  • Club and Organization Coordinator, Community Development
  • Assistant to the Vice President of Enrollment Management and Student Affairs
  • Alcohol and Other Drug Counselor, Counseling Center
  • Director, Community Development
  • Assistant Director, Student Health Center
Each of these individuals has contributed to prevention efforts in very unique and intentional ways. Many of the individuals on this list were part of the initial discussions on identifying areas for improvement in regards to prevention programming.The recommendations that laid the foundation for prevention work at The College at Brockport continue:Prevention Work Group Recommendations for Action
  1. The development of intentional programming and intervention built on the foundations of the Social Ecological Model of Health Promotion and Prevention (Individual, Interpersonal, Organization, Community, & Policy Level Interventions)
  2. A focus on residential students and the first-year experience can help provide population-based intervention through residence hall programs, summer orientation, Academic Planning Seminar (First-Year Experience) courses, and interactions with parents. This focus may be a starting point that can lead to a culture change in regards to high-risk drinking over an extended period of time.
  3. The development of Friday and Saturday evening social programming and a focus on connecting students to opportunities for involvement, engagement, and development.
  4. Increase the use of students in prevention programming, better understand "the power of peers," and utilize Social Norm Theory in a broader sense, not simply in regards to alcohol and substance use but highlight the positive experiences and behaviors of our students.
  5. Evaluate the effectiveness of workshops for policy offenders and implement appropriate changes as needed. Collect demographic area and learn more about the experiences of policy violators.
  6. Move away from traditional alcohol and drug education to a comprehensive, intentional, and evidence-based model of prevention.
  7. Address student alcohol and substance use in conjunction with and within the context of student success.

Shifting the Paradigm: From Education to Prevention

Prevention and Outreach Services provides leadership in the coordination of a number of different prevention programs, including:
  • A move away from general, population-based programs to intentional programs based on the unique needs and interests of specific student groups (off-campus students, Greek organizations, residential students, student leaders, athletes, etc.). Program assessments soon proved that in regards to prevention, programs cannot be "one size fits all."

  • A focus on supporting first-year students as they acclimate themselves to a new environment, show increased independence, and navigate the college experience/environment. Prevention programming is infused into summer orientation and 96% of all Academic Planning Seminar (First Year Experience) courses.

  • The development of the Student Health Advocate (SHA) position. Students in this position act as role models, educators, and "change agents" within the contexts of high-risk drinking and substance abuse prevention and student success. SHAs receive pre-semester training and help facilitate programming, reach hidden populations, and assist in program assessment.

  • A new model for Level I policy violators was enacted. Workshop curriculum was adapted to include asset development activities, motivational interviewing, and value/goal clarification exercises. Workshops now include a Friday afternoon group workshop, an individual Brief Alcohol Screening in College Students (BASICS) session, and an online assessment that provides personalized feedback on drinking behaviors.

  • A Residential Health Curriculum was developed that intentionally infused prevention messages into all programs, even those focused on fitness, nutrition, and mental health. This provides opportunities to explore the impacts of alcohol and substances within different contexts and student interests. It also provides consistent interactions with prevention messages throughout the entire academic year.

CONNECT: High-Risk Drinking and Substance Prevention Program 

A cumulative outcome of The College at Brockport's alcohol and other drug prevention work group and the initial programmatic changes was the development of a comprehensive and strategic plan focused on creating a campus culture that supports community development, student engagement, and healthy norms. The CONNECT High- Risk Drinking and Substance Abuse Prevention program was designed with three desired outcomes in mind:
  1. Create a social, academic, and community experience that promotes and influences healthy norms.

  2. Develop, implement, and assess health protection strategies to guard students from short term negative consequences of high-risk drinking and substance abuse.

  3. Intervene, treat, and provide referrals to students with alcohol or drug abuse or dependency problems.

After careful examination of our campus needs, foundations of prevention, and our goals of not only effective interventions, but also culture change, the name CONNECT was selected. CONNECT represents our goals in three distinct ways:

  1. Many aspects of the CONNECT program focus on connecting students to different opportunities to be involved, engaged, and develop. We recognize the role that student engagement has as a prevention tool.

  2. CONNECT requires support from each individual and department on campus. It is important to recognize the role that each of can play in preventing high-risk drinking and substance abuse. A shared vision will help use change the campus culture in regards to these concerns.

  3. The CONNECT program is modeled after the Social Ecological Model. This model demonstrates the intentionality and connectedness of different interventions, designed to reach different populations, at different levels of a community. Each of these levels is important and success at one level is not independent of success at the others. Every intervention, program, and outcome is intentional and connected to others.

There are 4 "Connecting Points" that are the foundations of CONNECT. These connecting points are integrated and it is our hopes that they will lead to our desired outcomes, decreased high-risk drinking and substance abuse, and fewer negative consequences associated with these behaviors. The following diagram shows the interconnectedness among program components:

Connecting Point I: Assessment and Evaluation

A commitment to intentional and effective prevention practices must have assessment and evaluation as a foundation and permeating factor throughout all efforts. Both qualitative and quantitative tools are used to measure the effectiveness and impact of each component of CONNECT. The following table highlights some of the many assessment tools used to guide programming and demonstrate the transformative effects of our efforts.

Intended Outcome Highlighted Assessment Tools
Create a social, academic, and community experience that promotes and influences healthy norms.
  • CORE Alcohol and Other Drug Survey 
  • Alcohol Screening Program Data
  • Student Conduct/University Police Reports 
  • Program Assessments (EagleCHECK, Level I Workshops, etc.) 
  • Focus Groups
Develop, implement, and assess health protection strategies to guard students from short term negative consequences of high-risk drinking and substance abuse.
  • CORE Alcohol and Other Drug Survey
  • Alcohol Screening Program Data
  • Student Conduct/University Police Reports
  • Program Assessments (EagleCHECK, Level I Workshops, etc.)
  • Focus Groups
Intervene, treat, and provide referrals to students with alcohol or drug abuse or dependency problems.
  • Process Assessments 
  • Referral Tracking 
  • Alcohol Screening Program Data 
  • Program Assessments (Level I Workshops)

Each element of the CONNECT program has their own assessment tool and process. The above table identifies our "big picture" outcomes and how they are assessed. Examples of individual program component assessments can be found throughout this report.

Applicability

Definitions

Policy Procedures

Links to Related Procedures and Information

Contact Information

History (in descending order)

Item Date Explanation
Next Review Date Three year review
Adoption Date 2015-08-01 Policy Adopted
Draft Review Date Draft Policy under 30-day Campus Review

Approval

Last Updated 5/27/20

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